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  • Autoinform | Double trouble
    Right Now back to the BMW I ll stick my hand up now and say until recently I hadn t worked or even fully understood how the BMW 335d turbo system worked and was unable to acquire any proper data from anywhere So I did plenty of workshop good old fashioned R D to develop a comprehensive test plan to hopefully help you guys Now firstly I want to explain exactly how the system is compromised and works by using pictures I stole from the internet Basically it s a fixed vein small Turbo which feeds a big fixed vein Big turbo which uses a wastgate None of these two turbo s are variable vein which I was completely unaware of until now The flow of Air and control of these turbos are regulated by a series of flaps one in the exhaust and one in the inlet Bare with me You can simplify their control by separating the process into 3 clear section Low RPM Mid RPM High RPM During low engine speeds only the small turbo is engaged offering instant sublime low down engine torque and power delivery During mid range both turbos are in operation and when moving at high speed only the big turbo operates and this is how it s achieved Key points At low engine speeds both bypass valves are closed forcing the air solely through the small turbo charger When you start to hit medium RPM the exhaust valve labelled A is opened forcing the air through the larger turbo pre charging the air into the small turbo then into the engine When you hit high engine speed the bypass valve B is opened forcing exhaust gas through the larger turbo enabling warp drive and time travel Just in case you didn t understand that here s a video of a smarter guy than me explaining it brilliantly http youtu be DRcmgibm aA So now we know how it works I m going to show you how to diagnose and test each component It s easy on a job like this and not know where to begin and I sometimes have to stop myself from diving in which inevitably leads to mistakes Firstly I acquired myself a diagram which labelled the precise order in which the turbo control system was plumed together There is a labyrinth of vacuum control hoses which not only deteriate over time but decide to move location flitting between components all by themselves Here is another diagram I stole from the internet Naturally I went through each and every single connection one by one to ensure correct fitment and to my surprise they were all absolutely spot on However the inlet bypass control pipe had been fit incorrectly and run through 90 degrees before it fitted onto the control solenoid making it crimped and restricting control vacuum I quickly re fitted the control hose and tested control functionality to all corresponding valves and wastegate I was abale to do

    Original URL path: http://www.autoinform.co.uk/double-trouble/?replytocom=60239 (2016-02-17)
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  • Autoinform | Double trouble
    easy Right Now back to the BMW I ll stick my hand up now and say until recently I hadn t worked or even fully understood how the BMW 335d turbo system worked and was unable to acquire any proper data from anywhere So I did plenty of workshop good old fashioned R D to develop a comprehensive test plan to hopefully help you guys Now firstly I want to explain exactly how the system is compromised and works by using pictures I stole from the internet Basically it s a fixed vein small Turbo which feeds a big fixed vein Big turbo which uses a wastgate None of these two turbo s are variable vein which I was completely unaware of until now The flow of Air and control of these turbos are regulated by a series of flaps one in the exhaust and one in the inlet Bare with me You can simplify their control by separating the process into 3 clear section Low RPM Mid RPM High RPM During low engine speeds only the small turbo is engaged offering instant sublime low down engine torque and power delivery During mid range both turbos are in operation and when moving at high speed only the big turbo operates and this is how it s achieved Key points At low engine speeds both bypass valves are closed forcing the air solely through the small turbo charger When you start to hit medium RPM the exhaust valve labelled A is opened forcing the air through the larger turbo pre charging the air into the small turbo then into the engine When you hit high engine speed the bypass valve B is opened forcing exhaust gas through the larger turbo enabling warp drive and time travel Just in case you didn t understand that here s a video of a smarter guy than me explaining it brilliantly http youtu be DRcmgibm aA So now we know how it works I m going to show you how to diagnose and test each component It s easy on a job like this and not know where to begin and I sometimes have to stop myself from diving in which inevitably leads to mistakes Firstly I acquired myself a diagram which labelled the precise order in which the turbo control system was plumed together There is a labyrinth of vacuum control hoses which not only deteriate over time but decide to move location flitting between components all by themselves Here is another diagram I stole from the internet Naturally I went through each and every single connection one by one to ensure correct fitment and to my surprise they were all absolutely spot on However the inlet bypass control pipe had been fit incorrectly and run through 90 degrees before it fitted onto the control solenoid making it crimped and restricting control vacuum I quickly re fitted the control hose and tested control functionality to all corresponding valves and wastegate I was abale to

    Original URL path: http://www.autoinform.co.uk/double-trouble/?replytocom=122504 (2016-02-17)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Autoinform | Double trouble
    easy Right Now back to the BMW I ll stick my hand up now and say until recently I hadn t worked or even fully understood how the BMW 335d turbo system worked and was unable to acquire any proper data from anywhere So I did plenty of workshop good old fashioned R D to develop a comprehensive test plan to hopefully help you guys Now firstly I want to explain exactly how the system is compromised and works by using pictures I stole from the internet Basically it s a fixed vein small Turbo which feeds a big fixed vein Big turbo which uses a wastgate None of these two turbo s are variable vein which I was completely unaware of until now The flow of Air and control of these turbos are regulated by a series of flaps one in the exhaust and one in the inlet Bare with me You can simplify their control by separating the process into 3 clear section Low RPM Mid RPM High RPM During low engine speeds only the small turbo is engaged offering instant sublime low down engine torque and power delivery During mid range both turbos are in operation and when moving at high speed only the big turbo operates and this is how it s achieved Key points At low engine speeds both bypass valves are closed forcing the air solely through the small turbo charger When you start to hit medium RPM the exhaust valve labelled A is opened forcing the air through the larger turbo pre charging the air into the small turbo then into the engine When you hit high engine speed the bypass valve B is opened forcing exhaust gas through the larger turbo enabling warp drive and time travel Just in case you didn t understand that here s a video of a smarter guy than me explaining it brilliantly http youtu be DRcmgibm aA So now we know how it works I m going to show you how to diagnose and test each component It s easy on a job like this and not know where to begin and I sometimes have to stop myself from diving in which inevitably leads to mistakes Firstly I acquired myself a diagram which labelled the precise order in which the turbo control system was plumed together There is a labyrinth of vacuum control hoses which not only deteriate over time but decide to move location flitting between components all by themselves Here is another diagram I stole from the internet Naturally I went through each and every single connection one by one to ensure correct fitment and to my surprise they were all absolutely spot on However the inlet bypass control pipe had been fit incorrectly and run through 90 degrees before it fitted onto the control solenoid making it crimped and restricting control vacuum I quickly re fitted the control hose and tested control functionality to all corresponding valves and wastegate I was abale to

    Original URL path: http://www.autoinform.co.uk/double-trouble/?replytocom=126457 (2016-02-17)
    Open archived version from archive


  • Autoinform | forumadmin
    country that knowing when to stop is as important as knowing what you are doing This story hot from our workshop just last week is a tale about both David my son has Clutching at Straws September 8 2014 2 Comments in Workshop Blog by forumadmin Clutching at straws by Frank Massey 13 plate Audi 1s don t often go wrong when a dual control driving instructors vehicle time is

    Original URL path: http://www.autoinform.co.uk/author/forumadmin/ (2016-02-17)
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  • Autoinform | Knowing when to stop
    this feature the next logical test is a blind pump or max pressure test This is also achieved using the pico scope and examining the profile noting not just the pressure but equally as important the rise time The results were excellent even with the reduced rotation speed whilst cranking max pressure was achieved in 600ms This leaves two points of possible leakage the drv or the injectors The next test is to remove the spill hose from all injectors and check for the absence of leakage under pressure The test proved the injectors to be faulty with several of them leaking badly At this point we could begin to estimate the repair cost There were some other issues with trapped vacuum control hoses under the intake manifold And sticking swirl flaps Removing the manifold exposed something quite new and unexpected No 1 cylinder inlet tracts seemed to suggest excessive heat partially melting the manifold moulding Armed with this new evidence we held an on site review with the customer suggesting re fitting the injectors which had been removed prior to replacement so that a compression test be conducted Not surprisingly the pressure in no 1 did not exceed 50bar Now we have a dramatic change in repair cost from 6 injectors a manifold and labour to the additional cylinder head overhaul Despiteit age a 57 plate and bmw marque the customer called time and decided not to continue with the needed repairs costing 3000 to 4000 Now begs the question why did someone attempt to tune a car running on 5 cylinders No turbo function due to the totally trapped control hose and pressurerail deviation An equally pertinent question is who carried out such appalling workmanship in the first place Knowing when to stop begins with knowing when not to begin Share this entry Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Share on Pinterest Share on Linkedin Share on Tumblr Share on Vk Share on Reddit Share by Mail 7 replies Dave says September 9 2014 at 11 56 am This goes to show that DIY and cowboys still try to fix the newer car not knowing what does what and bits and bobs off the internet ie cos I did this and got this does not always work with every car You need training on newer systems the time of a Sunday afternoon with a carb in bits have well and truly gone Reply Mark says September 9 2014 at 7 26 pm The sad truth of today which i see too much of and we all have to battle with is that the cowboys doing a short term Cheap Job fix are regarded as the hero s and the decent Professionals amongst us doing a proper job are regarded as rip off merchants when we have to try and fix these neglected complex wrecks Trying to educate joe public the long term real value of proper Professional Care is hard work To all ADS autoinform

    Original URL path: http://www.autoinform.co.uk/knowing-when-to-stop/?replytocom=17980 (2016-02-17)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Autoinform | Knowing when to stop
    this feature the next logical test is a blind pump or max pressure test This is also achieved using the pico scope and examining the profile noting not just the pressure but equally as important the rise time The results were excellent even with the reduced rotation speed whilst cranking max pressure was achieved in 600ms This leaves two points of possible leakage the drv or the injectors The next test is to remove the spill hose from all injectors and check for the absence of leakage under pressure The test proved the injectors to be faulty with several of them leaking badly At this point we could begin to estimate the repair cost There were some other issues with trapped vacuum control hoses under the intake manifold And sticking swirl flaps Removing the manifold exposed something quite new and unexpected No 1 cylinder inlet tracts seemed to suggest excessive heat partially melting the manifold moulding Armed with this new evidence we held an on site review with the customer suggesting re fitting the injectors which had been removed prior to replacement so that a compression test be conducted Not surprisingly the pressure in no 1 did not exceed 50bar Now we have a dramatic change in repair cost from 6 injectors a manifold and labour to the additional cylinder head overhaul Despiteit age a 57 plate and bmw marque the customer called time and decided not to continue with the needed repairs costing 3000 to 4000 Now begs the question why did someone attempt to tune a car running on 5 cylinders No turbo function due to the totally trapped control hose and pressurerail deviation An equally pertinent question is who carried out such appalling workmanship in the first place Knowing when to stop begins with knowing when not to begin Share this entry Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Share on Pinterest Share on Linkedin Share on Tumblr Share on Vk Share on Reddit Share by Mail 7 replies Dave says September 9 2014 at 11 56 am This goes to show that DIY and cowboys still try to fix the newer car not knowing what does what and bits and bobs off the internet ie cos I did this and got this does not always work with every car You need training on newer systems the time of a Sunday afternoon with a carb in bits have well and truly gone Reply Mark says September 9 2014 at 7 26 pm The sad truth of today which i see too much of and we all have to battle with is that the cowboys doing a short term Cheap Job fix are regarded as the hero s and the decent Professionals amongst us doing a proper job are regarded as rip off merchants when we have to try and fix these neglected complex wrecks Trying to educate joe public the long term real value of proper Professional Care is hard work To all ADS autoinform

    Original URL path: http://www.autoinform.co.uk/knowing-when-to-stop/?replytocom=18138 (2016-02-17)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Autoinform | Knowing when to stop
    this feature the next logical test is a blind pump or max pressure test This is also achieved using the pico scope and examining the profile noting not just the pressure but equally as important the rise time The results were excellent even with the reduced rotation speed whilst cranking max pressure was achieved in 600ms This leaves two points of possible leakage the drv or the injectors The next test is to remove the spill hose from all injectors and check for the absence of leakage under pressure The test proved the injectors to be faulty with several of them leaking badly At this point we could begin to estimate the repair cost There were some other issues with trapped vacuum control hoses under the intake manifold And sticking swirl flaps Removing the manifold exposed something quite new and unexpected No 1 cylinder inlet tracts seemed to suggest excessive heat partially melting the manifold moulding Armed with this new evidence we held an on site review with the customer suggesting re fitting the injectors which had been removed prior to replacement so that a compression test be conducted Not surprisingly the pressure in no 1 did not exceed 50bar Now we have a dramatic change in repair cost from 6 injectors a manifold and labour to the additional cylinder head overhaul Despiteit age a 57 plate and bmw marque the customer called time and decided not to continue with the needed repairs costing 3000 to 4000 Now begs the question why did someone attempt to tune a car running on 5 cylinders No turbo function due to the totally trapped control hose and pressurerail deviation An equally pertinent question is who carried out such appalling workmanship in the first place Knowing when to stop begins with knowing when not to begin Share this entry Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Share on Pinterest Share on Linkedin Share on Tumblr Share on Vk Share on Reddit Share by Mail 7 replies Dave says September 9 2014 at 11 56 am This goes to show that DIY and cowboys still try to fix the newer car not knowing what does what and bits and bobs off the internet ie cos I did this and got this does not always work with every car You need training on newer systems the time of a Sunday afternoon with a carb in bits have well and truly gone Reply Mark says September 9 2014 at 7 26 pm The sad truth of today which i see too much of and we all have to battle with is that the cowboys doing a short term Cheap Job fix are regarded as the hero s and the decent Professionals amongst us doing a proper job are regarded as rip off merchants when we have to try and fix these neglected complex wrecks Trying to educate joe public the long term real value of proper Professional Care is hard work To all ADS autoinform

    Original URL path: http://www.autoinform.co.uk/knowing-when-to-stop/?replytocom=18499 (2016-02-17)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Autoinform | Knowing when to stop
    this feature the next logical test is a blind pump or max pressure test This is also achieved using the pico scope and examining the profile noting not just the pressure but equally as important the rise time The results were excellent even with the reduced rotation speed whilst cranking max pressure was achieved in 600ms This leaves two points of possible leakage the drv or the injectors The next test is to remove the spill hose from all injectors and check for the absence of leakage under pressure The test proved the injectors to be faulty with several of them leaking badly At this point we could begin to estimate the repair cost There were some other issues with trapped vacuum control hoses under the intake manifold And sticking swirl flaps Removing the manifold exposed something quite new and unexpected No 1 cylinder inlet tracts seemed to suggest excessive heat partially melting the manifold moulding Armed with this new evidence we held an on site review with the customer suggesting re fitting the injectors which had been removed prior to replacement so that a compression test be conducted Not surprisingly the pressure in no 1 did not exceed 50bar Now we have a dramatic change in repair cost from 6 injectors a manifold and labour to the additional cylinder head overhaul Despiteit age a 57 plate and bmw marque the customer called time and decided not to continue with the needed repairs costing 3000 to 4000 Now begs the question why did someone attempt to tune a car running on 5 cylinders No turbo function due to the totally trapped control hose and pressurerail deviation An equally pertinent question is who carried out such appalling workmanship in the first place Knowing when to stop begins with knowing when not to begin Share this entry Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Share on Pinterest Share on Linkedin Share on Tumblr Share on Vk Share on Reddit Share by Mail 7 replies Dave says September 9 2014 at 11 56 am This goes to show that DIY and cowboys still try to fix the newer car not knowing what does what and bits and bobs off the internet ie cos I did this and got this does not always work with every car You need training on newer systems the time of a Sunday afternoon with a carb in bits have well and truly gone Reply Mark says September 9 2014 at 7 26 pm The sad truth of today which i see too much of and we all have to battle with is that the cowboys doing a short term Cheap Job fix are regarded as the hero s and the decent Professionals amongst us doing a proper job are regarded as rip off merchants when we have to try and fix these neglected complex wrecks Trying to educate joe public the long term real value of proper Professional Care is hard work To all ADS autoinform

    Original URL path: http://www.autoinform.co.uk/knowing-when-to-stop/?replytocom=18376 (2016-02-17)
    Open archived version from archive



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