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  • Autoinform | Knowing when to stop
    this feature the next logical test is a blind pump or max pressure test This is also achieved using the pico scope and examining the profile noting not just the pressure but equally as important the rise time The results were excellent even with the reduced rotation speed whilst cranking max pressure was achieved in 600ms This leaves two points of possible leakage the drv or the injectors The next test is to remove the spill hose from all injectors and check for the absence of leakage under pressure The test proved the injectors to be faulty with several of them leaking badly At this point we could begin to estimate the repair cost There were some other issues with trapped vacuum control hoses under the intake manifold And sticking swirl flaps Removing the manifold exposed something quite new and unexpected No 1 cylinder inlet tracts seemed to suggest excessive heat partially melting the manifold moulding Armed with this new evidence we held an on site review with the customer suggesting re fitting the injectors which had been removed prior to replacement so that a compression test be conducted Not surprisingly the pressure in no 1 did not exceed 50bar Now we have a dramatic change in repair cost from 6 injectors a manifold and labour to the additional cylinder head overhaul Despiteit age a 57 plate and bmw marque the customer called time and decided not to continue with the needed repairs costing 3000 to 4000 Now begs the question why did someone attempt to tune a car running on 5 cylinders No turbo function due to the totally trapped control hose and pressurerail deviation An equally pertinent question is who carried out such appalling workmanship in the first place Knowing when to stop begins with knowing when not to begin Share this entry Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Share on Pinterest Share on Linkedin Share on Tumblr Share on Vk Share on Reddit Share by Mail 7 replies Dave says September 9 2014 at 11 56 am This goes to show that DIY and cowboys still try to fix the newer car not knowing what does what and bits and bobs off the internet ie cos I did this and got this does not always work with every car You need training on newer systems the time of a Sunday afternoon with a carb in bits have well and truly gone Reply Mark says September 9 2014 at 7 26 pm The sad truth of today which i see too much of and we all have to battle with is that the cowboys doing a short term Cheap Job fix are regarded as the hero s and the decent Professionals amongst us doing a proper job are regarded as rip off merchants when we have to try and fix these neglected complex wrecks Trying to educate joe public the long term real value of proper Professional Care is hard work To all ADS autoinform

    Original URL path: http://www.autoinform.co.uk/knowing-when-to-stop/?replytocom=18498 (2016-02-17)
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  • Autoinform | Knowing when to stop
    this feature the next logical test is a blind pump or max pressure test This is also achieved using the pico scope and examining the profile noting not just the pressure but equally as important the rise time The results were excellent even with the reduced rotation speed whilst cranking max pressure was achieved in 600ms This leaves two points of possible leakage the drv or the injectors The next test is to remove the spill hose from all injectors and check for the absence of leakage under pressure The test proved the injectors to be faulty with several of them leaking badly At this point we could begin to estimate the repair cost There were some other issues with trapped vacuum control hoses under the intake manifold And sticking swirl flaps Removing the manifold exposed something quite new and unexpected No 1 cylinder inlet tracts seemed to suggest excessive heat partially melting the manifold moulding Armed with this new evidence we held an on site review with the customer suggesting re fitting the injectors which had been removed prior to replacement so that a compression test be conducted Not surprisingly the pressure in no 1 did not exceed 50bar Now we have a dramatic change in repair cost from 6 injectors a manifold and labour to the additional cylinder head overhaul Despiteit age a 57 plate and bmw marque the customer called time and decided not to continue with the needed repairs costing 3000 to 4000 Now begs the question why did someone attempt to tune a car running on 5 cylinders No turbo function due to the totally trapped control hose and pressurerail deviation An equally pertinent question is who carried out such appalling workmanship in the first place Knowing when to stop begins with knowing when not to begin Share this entry Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Share on Pinterest Share on Linkedin Share on Tumblr Share on Vk Share on Reddit Share by Mail 7 replies Dave says September 9 2014 at 11 56 am This goes to show that DIY and cowboys still try to fix the newer car not knowing what does what and bits and bobs off the internet ie cos I did this and got this does not always work with every car You need training on newer systems the time of a Sunday afternoon with a carb in bits have well and truly gone Reply Mark says September 9 2014 at 7 26 pm The sad truth of today which i see too much of and we all have to battle with is that the cowboys doing a short term Cheap Job fix are regarded as the hero s and the decent Professionals amongst us doing a proper job are regarded as rip off merchants when we have to try and fix these neglected complex wrecks Trying to educate joe public the long term real value of proper Professional Care is hard work To all ADS autoinform

    Original URL path: http://www.autoinform.co.uk/knowing-when-to-stop/?replytocom=32722 (2016-02-17)
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  • Autoinform | Knowing when to stop
    this feature the next logical test is a blind pump or max pressure test This is also achieved using the pico scope and examining the profile noting not just the pressure but equally as important the rise time The results were excellent even with the reduced rotation speed whilst cranking max pressure was achieved in 600ms This leaves two points of possible leakage the drv or the injectors The next test is to remove the spill hose from all injectors and check for the absence of leakage under pressure The test proved the injectors to be faulty with several of them leaking badly At this point we could begin to estimate the repair cost There were some other issues with trapped vacuum control hoses under the intake manifold And sticking swirl flaps Removing the manifold exposed something quite new and unexpected No 1 cylinder inlet tracts seemed to suggest excessive heat partially melting the manifold moulding Armed with this new evidence we held an on site review with the customer suggesting re fitting the injectors which had been removed prior to replacement so that a compression test be conducted Not surprisingly the pressure in no 1 did not exceed 50bar Now we have a dramatic change in repair cost from 6 injectors a manifold and labour to the additional cylinder head overhaul Despiteit age a 57 plate and bmw marque the customer called time and decided not to continue with the needed repairs costing 3000 to 4000 Now begs the question why did someone attempt to tune a car running on 5 cylinders No turbo function due to the totally trapped control hose and pressurerail deviation An equally pertinent question is who carried out such appalling workmanship in the first place Knowing when to stop begins with knowing when not to begin Share this entry Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Share on Pinterest Share on Linkedin Share on Tumblr Share on Vk Share on Reddit Share by Mail 7 replies Dave says September 9 2014 at 11 56 am This goes to show that DIY and cowboys still try to fix the newer car not knowing what does what and bits and bobs off the internet ie cos I did this and got this does not always work with every car You need training on newer systems the time of a Sunday afternoon with a carb in bits have well and truly gone Reply Mark says September 9 2014 at 7 26 pm The sad truth of today which i see too much of and we all have to battle with is that the cowboys doing a short term Cheap Job fix are regarded as the hero s and the decent Professionals amongst us doing a proper job are regarded as rip off merchants when we have to try and fix these neglected complex wrecks Trying to educate joe public the long term real value of proper Professional Care is hard work To all ADS autoinform

    Original URL path: http://www.autoinform.co.uk/knowing-when-to-stop/?replytocom=51756 (2016-02-17)
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  • Autoinform | Clutching at Straws
    s hoverer the devil is always in the detail View the response in measuring dynamics this confirmed no binary data response to pedal sensor value when depressing the pedal The more obvious clue was the dashboard message to depress the clutch pedal whilst engaging the start button image Autologic Screen The pedal sensor is a bidirectional hall device so let s list the possibilities a wiring error a sensor error operational environment error The next dare I say sensible action would be test its output with our pico however David decided upon some lateral thinking Based on the principles of hall sensor operation a change in the magnetic field across the hall IC leads to a change in the applied voltage Enquiring as to the contents of my tool box I produced a small rectangular magnet With the sensor removed from the clutch master cylinder it was possible to extend the wiring so that the magnet could be passed across it whilst monitoring live data The result confirmed a binary change from 0 to1 Conclusion The sensor was ok the problem was an operational environment issue within the hydraulic cylinder image photo of component In view of the urgency a vor order was placed for a replacement hydraulic cylinder Unusually for TPS the wrong part arrived so more joint lateral thinking why not leave the magnet in a binary 1 position allowing the starter to be engaged And so it was a temporary repair allowing use of the vehicle The only down side a dtc was now present preventing operation of the stop start function not a bad swap though The correct part was in short supply eventually when fitted all dtc s cleared and full operation was restored Share this entry Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on

    Original URL path: http://www.autoinform.co.uk/clutching-at-straws/?replytocom=18465 (2016-02-17)
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  • Autoinform | Clutching at Straws
    s hoverer the devil is always in the detail View the response in measuring dynamics this confirmed no binary data response to pedal sensor value when depressing the pedal The more obvious clue was the dashboard message to depress the clutch pedal whilst engaging the start button image Autologic Screen The pedal sensor is a bidirectional hall device so let s list the possibilities a wiring error a sensor error operational environment error The next dare I say sensible action would be test its output with our pico however David decided upon some lateral thinking Based on the principles of hall sensor operation a change in the magnetic field across the hall IC leads to a change in the applied voltage Enquiring as to the contents of my tool box I produced a small rectangular magnet With the sensor removed from the clutch master cylinder it was possible to extend the wiring so that the magnet could be passed across it whilst monitoring live data The result confirmed a binary change from 0 to1 Conclusion The sensor was ok the problem was an operational environment issue within the hydraulic cylinder image photo of component In view of the urgency a vor order was placed for a replacement hydraulic cylinder Unusually for TPS the wrong part arrived so more joint lateral thinking why not leave the magnet in a binary 1 position allowing the starter to be engaged And so it was a temporary repair allowing use of the vehicle The only down side a dtc was now present preventing operation of the stop start function not a bad swap though The correct part was in short supply eventually when fitted all dtc s cleared and full operation was restored Share this entry Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on

    Original URL path: http://www.autoinform.co.uk/clutching-at-straws/?replytocom=139890 (2016-02-17)
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  • Autoinform | Current Measurement, Tools and Process
    when evaluating actuators and what tools actually work and where can I get them Correct Current flow is very important however its only one off 3 critical components 1 current flow 2 rise time 3 induction Rise time relates to the resistive value and the available pressure ever tried to get a golf ball down a drinking straw The unit of induction is the henry This applies especially when testing the rate of response within an injector againstthe control on signal It takes into account voltage currentflow current rise time speed of current interruption and the electromagnetic field effect the pintle movement has to the current path temperature also has a part to play One thing is for certain as I recently observed to the contrary in a technical journal the voltage and current flow must share a common response So how do we measure current and why current first Current flow is equal throughout the entire circuit so the opportunity is much easier The control fuse or power relay for example Using an inductive current clamp it s actually a hall device ensures a non intrusive means of measurement The sensitivity and rise time of the clamp is vital more lately It not only provides measurement of flow but the effectiveness of the current interruption this of course is imperative for good induction This is the responsibility of the power transistor within the pcm or ignition coil as with the latest direct ignition systems The tool of choice is of course my pico and a range of current clamps the critical observation is profile or shape You won t find this data in any books it s taken me over 30 years to find the confidence and knowledge in current testing Let s examine some examples 1 a simple ground on injector Note the voltage drop and somewhat slower current ramp the kink represents the pintle snapping open effecting the inductance in the injector winding 2 a power on injector Note a much more rapid increase in current path this is due to the discharge of a capacitor To protect the component from damage current control is introduced via the pcm rapid switching of the voltage limits the current flow during the extended open period 3 ignition current profile Note how rapid the current is interrupted this provides excellent induction and good ht energy measured in joules 4 a more subtle example of current in a wide band sensor Note the current range volts divided by 10 5milli amps This takes a very special current clamp the K2 0 500ma Not available from any automotive sources Exceptus 5 this is what happens when you get it wrong Note this is the runner flap control on a Audi a6 it s a high frequency duty controlled motor the pico clamp cannot measure current fast enough its reporting a current of 100mv 1 amp linear Not possible within a digitally switched event 6 now look at the same component with a

    Original URL path: http://www.autoinform.co.uk/current-measurement-tools-and-process/?replytocom=3533 (2016-02-17)
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  • Autoinform | Caution V Common sense.
    window of opportunity the engine not only running but on load and monitoring functionality in real time Back to the Pico I think firstly I had to establish best criteria from a good known sample the Z4 I decided to conduct a compression test in real time with the engine running the initial evaluation included a crank start run and acceleration profile of the engine compression performance Waveform 1 Z4 Note the overall profile and compression value expressed in voltage using the Pico pressure transducer Next we applied the same test in identical conditions to the 318i Waveform 2 318i Note similar crank start and idle values reinforcing earlier test results however on acceleration note a much lower cylinder pressure and more significant the compression loss on full load Waveform close up 3 The remarkable thing is that the compression anomalies can occur on individual piston strokes all fuelling and ignition had of course been removed from the test cylinder leaving only mechanical functionality responsible for the results So there we have it a internal mechanical problem what restrained us in forming a decision sooner was a lack of absolute proof not a bad thing but also the cost implications if we got it wrong Caution Verses common sense By Frank Massey Share this entry Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Share on Pinterest Share on Linkedin Share on Tumblr Share on Vk Share on Reddit Share by Mail 9 replies Maurice Donovan says May 22 2014 at 7 31 pm Frank it is a whole different world out there once anyone with a small bit of common sense could fix there own cars but it is a different story in today s world of computers on wheels Like always loved your story and nothing beats the sort of prof we get by the use of our modern lab scopes and other sophisticated equipment we have available to us these days Your a world leader in the world of Diagnostics and we appreciate the huge contribution you and your son offer us Today it is all about science we have to prove what is wrong before we can fix the problem Reply Tom Harrison says June 20 2014 at 8 02 pm Fascinating diagnostics by a true professional Phil Ellisdin of Asnu says it all we can t all be the Frank Massey s of this world but with the right training and tools we can certainly improve our skills Regards Tom Harrison Asnu distributor for Canada Reply David says June 21 2014 at 8 43 am Frank just a thought from me It seems that you spent a good deal of time and expense on this vehicle only in the end although problem area has been diagnosed not to have it cured What was your customers reaction to your bill I m guessing that they would not want to go to the expense of engine strip rebuild especially if its a resale car point I trying

    Original URL path: http://www.autoinform.co.uk/caution-v-common-sense/?replytocom=2342 (2016-02-17)
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  • Autoinform | Caution V Common sense.
    window of opportunity the engine not only running but on load and monitoring functionality in real time Back to the Pico I think firstly I had to establish best criteria from a good known sample the Z4 I decided to conduct a compression test in real time with the engine running the initial evaluation included a crank start run and acceleration profile of the engine compression performance Waveform 1 Z4 Note the overall profile and compression value expressed in voltage using the Pico pressure transducer Next we applied the same test in identical conditions to the 318i Waveform 2 318i Note similar crank start and idle values reinforcing earlier test results however on acceleration note a much lower cylinder pressure and more significant the compression loss on full load Waveform close up 3 The remarkable thing is that the compression anomalies can occur on individual piston strokes all fuelling and ignition had of course been removed from the test cylinder leaving only mechanical functionality responsible for the results So there we have it a internal mechanical problem what restrained us in forming a decision sooner was a lack of absolute proof not a bad thing but also the cost implications if we got it wrong Caution Verses common sense By Frank Massey Share this entry Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Share on Pinterest Share on Linkedin Share on Tumblr Share on Vk Share on Reddit Share by Mail 9 replies Maurice Donovan says May 22 2014 at 7 31 pm Frank it is a whole different world out there once anyone with a small bit of common sense could fix there own cars but it is a different story in today s world of computers on wheels Like always loved your story and nothing beats the sort of prof we get by the use of our modern lab scopes and other sophisticated equipment we have available to us these days Your a world leader in the world of Diagnostics and we appreciate the huge contribution you and your son offer us Today it is all about science we have to prove what is wrong before we can fix the problem Reply Tom Harrison says June 20 2014 at 8 02 pm Fascinating diagnostics by a true professional Phil Ellisdin of Asnu says it all we can t all be the Frank Massey s of this world but with the right training and tools we can certainly improve our skills Regards Tom Harrison Asnu distributor for Canada Reply David says June 21 2014 at 8 43 am Frank just a thought from me It seems that you spent a good deal of time and expense on this vehicle only in the end although problem area has been diagnosed not to have it cured What was your customers reaction to your bill I m guessing that they would not want to go to the expense of engine strip rebuild especially if its a resale car point I trying

    Original URL path: http://www.autoinform.co.uk/caution-v-common-sense/?replytocom=3461 (2016-02-17)
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