web-archive-uk.com


Web directory, archive
Search web-archive-uk.com:


Find domain in archive system:
web-archive-uk.com » UK » B » BLUEDOME.CO.UK

Total: 767

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Crystal Lakes and Mountains Slovenia Slideshow
    first previous next last 1 of 27

    Original URL path: http://www.bluedome.co.uk/slovenia_summer_waliking/sloveniaslideshow/CrystalLakesandMountainsSl/01bohinj.html (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Bluedome
    using a wide range of available materials have developed over the centuries simple bent sticks used by native peoples through to the sophisticated laminated bows of persia that still command respect for their ability to shoot arrows vast distances the history of the bow also stands comparison with our modern arms race mediaeval armourers strived to protect soldiers from the highly developed arrow points of english longbowmen much as we try to counter weapons today The modern archer owes a great deal to his forefathers the same care and attention we lavish on our space age bows and arrows would not be lost on the ancient bowyers and archers they would be at home with modern equipment because the fundamentals of shooting a bow have never changed The materials we use to make modern bows and arrows simply reflect the quest for perfection that archers have pursued for centuries in archery catologues hybrid arrows made from combining carbon fibres with ultra high spec alloy tubes can be seen along side materials for making Longbows and wooden arrows A study of ancient Egyptian archery relics shows them to be technically superb in particular the arrows which are made from reeds tipped

    Original URL path: http://www.bluedome.co.uk/Archery/archeryhistory.html (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Modern Bow Design
    stage of composite bows are being made entirely of Carbon Fibre although some doubts remain about this material when used in this area Arrow design has also progressed with all the Worlds top target archers now using either Carbon or hybrid Carbon fibre alloy arrows this type of arrow gives unsurpassed levels of accuracy and many World records are now set at the maximum score level In spite of the march of technology many archers still shoot bows from the past In the UK the Long Bow is enjoying a resurgence of interest Europe and the USA also have growing numbers of archers who are shooting early Bows The pressures of target archery seems to be a motivating factor for archers who have started to take part in Field archery where targets are laid out in woodland areas with some difficult shots under tree branches and uphill or downhill shots Compound Bows are often found in this type of competition the high arrow speed and the fitting of a magnifying sight producing a remarkable level of accuracy Compound bows are also shot at world level in standard target competitions and will probably become fully allowed at the Olympics at the

    Original URL path: http://www.bluedome.co.uk/Archery/archerydesign.html (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Bluedome
    who shoot this style seem to have a great deal of fun in spite of lost or damaged arrows Different disciplines in Field archery allow archers to shoot at known distances or at targets that require you to develope the skill of estimating the distance Field archery is shot at World level with some of the best archers from other disciplines proving that a good archer is a good archer regardless of the target 3D archery is similar in many repects to Field archery The target course is always in a woodland setting allowing some very challenging target placements the targets themselves are replica animals made of plastic foam Starting in the USA where at one recent competition a valley was full of life size plastic elk the 3D form of archery has been a great success and is starting to find favour in other parts of the World Target archery as we know it today owes its modern appearance to the Prince Regent later to become George the fourth of england the target its size and colours were set down in the 1800 s and remain largely unchanged today Archery competitions were shot using the Long Bow and target arrows and some of the records shot still stand today mainly those of Horace Ford who was the foremost Long Bow target archer of his day Archery clubs can be found in almost every country of the World and most of them practice at the familiar round target a glance at the record books clearly shows that alongside technical improvements in equipment archers themselves have developed skills that rank them as true athletes In 1972 the World Record for a FITA round was 1204 pts Today that record is 1361 pts Archery competitions are shot indoors at World level and

    Original URL path: http://www.bluedome.co.uk/Archery/archerycompetition.html (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Bluedome
    different whatever the reason Caving has an appeal for people from all backgrounds and levels of interest Few Caving trips take the form of a quick visit as with many outdoor activities Caving has its own associated risks and any Caving expedition must assess and prepare to counter the dangers with training and skill One of the appeals of caving is learning to overcome the many technical problems that are encountered when travelling in this strange enviroment There are some similarities between caving and climbing the appearance of some equipment is similar and the physical skills and techniques can appear to be the same but Caving requires a wide range of abilities that climbers do not employ Most British universities have caving clubs and the NCA web site has a large directory of UK Caving clubs if you feel that you want to begin the best place to start is with a club that can offer good advice and qualified instruction on equipment techniques and safety Books on Caving techniques and guide books to cave systems across the world can be found in all good libraries the Web also offers a wealth of caving info from a wide range of

    Original URL path: http://www.bluedome.co.uk/Caving/cavingintro.html (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Bluedome
    to carry Is spare lighting being carried If the club is a university or college club it will almost certainly have a set of guidelines for caving Ask for a copy and compare with what you have been told If you are at all unsure ask for clarification All adult cavers participating in an informal group or club situation should seek as soon as possible to improve personal competence and help to share the responsibilities for each trip e g all party members should know what to do in the event of an accident Basic first aid is an important skill and as many as possible should be trained If you have any health problems likely to affect performance during the activity you should let the leaders know prior to the start of the activity If you become distressed or concerned during the activity you should bring this to the immediate attention of the other members of the party including the leader Hypothermia is one of the main hazards and you need to make sure that proper precautions are taken to avoid its onset i e proper clothing for the conditions to be encountered staying dry if at all possible eating properly before and during trips ensuring that the pace and length of the trip is appropriate to the fitness of participants and avoiding long waits at ladder pitches etc Hypothermia Symptoms include sufferer becomes quiet lacks interest becomes slow and starts lagging behind mental deterioration uncharacteristic behaviour loss of faculties e g slurring of speech shivering loss of consciousness breath smells of acetone Party members should be aware of what actions to take should any party member exhibit the symptoms of hypothermia Access All caves belong to someone Most require the crossing of private land and in many cases

    Original URL path: http://www.bluedome.co.uk/Caving/cavingbeginners.htm (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Bluedome
    law If seen in a cave they should be left alone and passed as quickly and quietly as possible Do not pollute the cave leave nothing behind Except under exceptional circumstances nothing that is taken into a cave should ever be left in Take out all litter food and waste Because of the toxic waste produced by carbide lamps this type of lighting is now discouraged and electric lighting is preferred Archaeological and other remains should not be disturbed The cave environment often contains important palaeontological and archaeological remains These may include industrial and pre industrial artefacts They should not be disturbed and only investigated by competent specialists Do not interfere with scientific equipment To study the cave environment it is often necessary to leave expensive and fragile equipment underground Disturbing this may damage the equipment and destroy valuable work Set a good example for others to follow One way to pass on good conservation practices to others is through education and setting a good personal example Be responsible show an interest and understanding of caving and demonstrate the cave conservation code in action Avoid touching or damaging formations It is sometimes tempting to touch formations because they look so inviting This should be avoided because the formations will be soiled Each individual caver may notice no difference from a single touch but hundreds or even thousands of grubby fingers will completely ruin beautiful formations It should be remembered that formations are not always made of pretty crystals they may be mud sand or rock and all should be treated with the same respect Take nothing but photographs Nothing except for litter left by the careless should ever be removed from a cave Broken formations and other geological specimens including rocks should be left untouched Comply with any access requirements

    Original URL path: http://www.bluedome.co.uk/Caving/conservation.htm (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Bluedome
    them have taken part in This section of BlueDome will chronicle their progress We start with a dramatic account of adventure and survival in the Alps as the team prepare for the expedition Training for Stok Kangri Alpine Epic part one Alpine Epic part two Alpine Epic part three Alpine Epic part four Stok Kangri the TTX Mountain Reports Report One Arrival in India Report Two Nightmare in Customs Report

    Original URL path: http://www.bluedome.co.uk/ttx/index.html (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive



  •  


web-archive-uk.com, 2017-12-15