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  • Bluedome
    of the carrying system when the stretcher is assembled and in use Additionally the pack frames can be used as a second lightweight back up stretcher One half incorporates a collapsable head guard which can be erected quickly to protect the casualty against possible stonefall when being lowered The stretcher has four attachment rings for lowering The handles fold out and additional tapes can be used for carrying The stretcher s weight is 24 74 kg when assembled It is used widely throughout England and Wales and in a number of countries throughout the world The MacInnes and the MacInnes Superlight The standard or split model like the Bell comes in two halves each with its own integral carrying system each half incorporates locking tubular retractable handles The stretcher weighs 22kg when assembled The MacInnes stretcher is extensively used in Scotland as well as throughout the world It has been developed over a considerable number of years It has very effective skids for lowering on snow slopes It has also the capability to have a wheel attached for ease of movement over suitable terrain in the long glens The Superlight weighs 11kg with folding halves and is complete in one piece It is also capable of having a wheel attached The Bell and MacInnes stretchers are the mainstay of Mountain Rescue teams in Britain however there are some others worth a mention The Alphin This is a folding one piece stretcher made by Troll Safety Equipment It has a polycarbonate bed and short spinal protection strip below the bed It is narrow and is excellent for constricted spaces hence its popularity with industry and the Fire Brigade It handles well on the crag when lowering particularly horizontally The Ogwen This is used by a few teams and was developed by Ogwen Mountain Rescue Organisation For those who see or experience the R A F helicopters in action these carry and use two different stretchers on occasion the Stokes Litter or cradle or the Neil Robertson Stretcher also used by Cave Rescue CASUALTY BAGS Individual teams use a variety of lightweight bags but the MRC have gone over to a standard heavyweight bag made to our specifications by Aguille Alpine Equipment This is now M R C standard issue The bag features a full length zip and is long enough to accommodate the tallest of casualties The bag has a waterproof lining and fibre pile inner It has carrying straps and zip access to enable monitoring of the casualty without having to undo the whole bag VACUUM MATTRESSES A number of these full body splinting immobilising mattresses are on trial in England after extensive use in Europe and Scotland The most effective to date seems to be the Hartwell but we are working to develop our own design The ability to effectively immobilise a casualty with back or neck injuries before transportation is vital MEDICAL EQUIPMENT The greatest advances however have been made in medical equipment which through new technology is

    Original URL path: http://www.bluedome.co.uk/Assoc/mrc/equipment.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • Bluedome
    good quality Vibram type sole are essential Remember also that well worn old soles are a hazard in themselves Boots that have a sloping front edge to the heel section have also proved a problem on steep wet grass and snow Also a cut away angle at the back of the heel does not allow the boot to be firmly dug into the slope Food Always carry some extra food for emergencies e g sweets chocolate glucose tablets etc Remember an active day in the outdoor environment does use up a good quantity of body fuel No fuel no go Map Compass Essential items but of no value if you don t know how to use them Also referring to a map when you need to may be too late Carry it on your person not in your rucksack and refer to it on a regular basis Makes all sorts of decisions so much easier if you know precisely where you are quicker and more accurate too Whistle Learn the signal for rescue Six good long blasts Stop for 1 minute Repeat Carry on the whistle blasts until someone reaches you Do not stop because you have heard a reply because rescuers may be using your blasts as a direction finder especially in bad visibility Torch A must Spare bulbs and batteries are a sound precaution Can be used for signalling as well as for whistle First Aid A small kit can be invaluable in dealing with minor problems thus preventing them becoming major ones Elastoplast wound dressing crepe bandage etc Useful additions to the list are pencil and waterproof pad for written messages in an emergency For more serious injuries splints bandages and even stretchers for certain injuries can be improvised from ice axes skis tent poles etc Survival Emergency Kit A polythene survival bag for shelter and spare clothing for warmth if benighted or injured are invaluable Winter Conditions Snow and ice plus the reduced daylight hours can change a pleasant 4 5 hour stroll in the summer to a long epic journey in mid winter Paths which pose no real dangers or problems can change overnight and many real hazards are formed by the ground conditions A good example would be the Llanberis path up Snowdon and the dangerous snow slopes that can build up on it for most of the winter Correct kit is obviously very important as is understanding the limitations and problems inherent in using such equipment Most waterproofs tops and trousers are very slippery if you fall on snow or ice less friction Having an ice axe offers the only protection if you know what to do with it what about practising braking on a safe slope and crampons can be invaluable Carrying survival equipment is very important due to the fact that the odds of an accident are higher in these conditions Adding a sleeping bag to everyones list makes good sense There is a flip side to every situation and good snow conditions can enable one to travel quite quickly in full control Glissading can help on down hill sections but beware unless you know the ground and snow conditions for the full length of the slope Avalanches In recent years there has been an increasing number of avalanche accidents These have been caused mainly by climbers attempting routes during or shortly after a heavy snowfall which has fallen on older snow or after a sudden thaw Various types of slab avalanches and wet snow avalanches are most common and their danger and frequency should not be underestimated New snow or drifting snow accumulates as soft or hard slab under the influence of the wind particularly in the lee of ridges and other natural features Such places should be avoided until the snow has consolidated Avalanche Victims This is one of the few incidents when you should NOT go for the rescue team Your efforts and those of any companions could be the avalanche victims best chance Life expectancy after half an hour drops to 50 and therefore the first hour is crucial Your first concern should be for the safety of you and your party check for further danger Mark the last seen point of the victim Quick search listening carefully and looking for any signs mittens hats or rucksacks Mark the point carefully and dont remove any items found these can be useful clues to the line of fall of a submerged avalanche victim If avalanche cords or tranceivers are being used your task should be relatively straightforward Undertake a thorough search If after an hour you have not made any progress send for further help If you had a reasonably large party you might have sent for help earlier but never at the expense of an immediate search being undertaken The casualty dug from the snow should be removed to a place which is safe from further avalanche their nose and mouth cleared or at least checked All avalanche victims should be insulated from the cold ground or snow and should be treated for hypothermia and shock Partially submerged victims should be pulled from the snow very quickly The golden rule of not climbing for 24 hours after a heavy snowfall is good advice It should be remembered however that good knowledge of the previous weeks weather is also important Heavy winds some time ago could have produced windslab slopes which could still be dangerous particularly if a stable cold period has existed A good understanding of windslab and its significance is therefore advised as well as the 24 hour rule of thumb For further information read Mountain Leadership by Eric Langmuir Scotland Conditions in Scotland are materially different from those in other parts of the UK the country is more rugged and longer distances must be covered on foot whilst inhabited dwellings in mountainous districts are few Experience gained only in England and Wales can be misleading Weather conditions are more unreliable and more severe even in

    Original URL path: http://www.bluedome.co.uk/Assoc/mrc/mrcsafe/mrcsafe.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • Bluedome
    Rescue Panel Northern Ireland Mountain Rescue Committee Irish Mountain Rescue Association Mountain Rescue Council of Scotland RAF Mountain Rescue Association Lake District Search and Mountain Rescue Association Cockermouth MR Team Coniston MR Team Furness MR Team Kendal MR Team Keswick MR Team Kirkby Stephen MSR Team Langdale Ambleside MR Team Millom FR Team Patterdale MR Team Penrith MR Team Wasdale MR Team SARDA England Cumbrian Ore Mines Rescue Unit Back to Index Mid Pennine Search and Rescue Organisation Bolton MR Team Calder Valley MR team Holme Valley Moorland Rescue Team Bowland Pennine MR Team Rossendale SR Team RAF Stafford MR Team Cave Rescue Organisation SARDA England Back to Index North East Search and Rescue Association Cleveland SR Team North of Tyne SR Team Northumberland National Park Search and Rescue Team Scarborough District SR team Teesdale Weardale SR Team RAF Leeming MR Team SARDA England Back to Index North Wales Mountain Rescue Association Aberglasyn Hall O E C North East Wales SR Team HM Coastguard Holyhead HM Coastguard MR Team 83 Llanberis MR Team North Wales Cave Rescue Organisation Outward Bound Wales SR Team Ogwen Valley MR Team Plas Y Brenin MR Team RAF Valley MR Team RAF Valley C Flight 22 SQN South Snowdonia SR Team Snowdonia National Park Wardens SARDA Wales Back to Index Peak District Mountain Rescue Organisation Buxton MR Team Derby MR Team Edale MR Team Glossop MR Team Kinder MR Team Oldham MR Team RAF Stafford MR Team Woodhead MR Team Derbyshire Cave Rescue Organisation SARDA England Back to Index South Wales Search and Rescue Organisation Brecon MR Team Powys N Beacons Brecon MR Team Mid Glamorgan s Beacons Bridgend MR Team Longtown MR Team RAF St Athan MR Team South Wales Cave Rescue Organisation SARDA Wales Back to Index South West England Rescue Association Avon

    Original URL path: http://www.bluedome.co.uk/Assoc/mrc/mrclinks.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • Bluedome
    anatomy of Major vessels Major bony points Structure such as trachea Heart etc 2 Respiratory tract Particularly upper airway 3 Skeletal system Long bones of limbs including Main points Spine and spinal cord 4 Anatomical sites suitable for IM injection PRACTICAL ASPECTS Able to demonstrate 1 and 4 above PHYSIOLOGY Good knowledge of the mechanics of breathing and the process of respiration Principles of blood circulation and heart action Temperature control modes of heat loss and gain Principle features of blood sugar control Main factors of blood clotting and arrest of bleeding Principle features of sugar control PATHOLOGY Understand General effects of injury Good knowledge of shock causes symptoms and signs Major hazards of infection to the casualty to the rescuers FRACTURES DISLOCATIONS Understand the accompanying soft tissue injuries and risk of damage to nerves and blood vessels Know the signs indicating a fracture the difference between stable and unstable fractures the definition and risks of a compound fracture expected blood loss and various factors Have a picture of likely fractures according to age and nature of injury Be particularly aware of injury grouping e g spinal injury with fracture of calcaneum Recognise and know particular risk of these injuries Wrist and forearm fractures Elbow fractures and dislocations Fracutres of humerus Shoulder dislocation Clavicle fracture Ankle fracture Tibia and fib fractures Patella fractures Knee ligament injuries Femoral shaft fractures Femoral neck fractures PRACTICAL ASPECTS Assessment of distal circulation Splintage and where necessary reduction Importance of traction Apply Collar and cuff Broad sling Kramer wire splints Inflatable splints Vacuum splints Lower limb traction splints SPINAL INJURY Mechanism of injury Risks at different spinal levels Indications of cord damage or risk of damage PRACTICAL ASPECTS Ability to Apply cervical splint in any position Immobilise spine using spinal split or vacuum mattress Move patient safely Protect pressure areas DIAGNOSIS Be familiar with the concept of a working diagnosis Have a clear picture of probable injury patterns Be able to compare right with left and patient and self PRACTICAL ASPECTS Be competent to Perform systematic examination Record pulse rate at different sites recognise irregular pulse Record respiratory rate Recognise cyanosis pallor skin temperature sweating Assess blood loss from clothing etc Communicate findings by radio CHEST INJURY Recognise serious problems Unstable fractures Pneumothorax Intra thoracic bleeding PRACTICAL ASPECTS Stabilise flail segment Seal Penetrating wounds HEAT ILLNESS Heat stress Heat exhaustion Dehydration Treatment Rehydration Cooling Dangers of heat stroke COLD INJURY Mechanisms of heat loss Mechanisms of heat gain Cold defence activity Cold stress Hypothermia Risk situations symptoms signs hypothermia Importance of exhaustion and hypoglycaemia MANAGEMENT Insulation Air warming Profound hypothermia Monitoring during evacuation PRACTICAL ASPECTS Temperature measurement Oral rectal Tympanic membrane Cas bag insulation Use of air warming device e g Little Dragon FROSTBITE Symptoms and signs Treatment WOUNDS Assessment of blood loss Risk of deep structure damage Clean Vs dirty wounds Possibility of handling foreign bodies PRACTICAL ASPECTS Arrest of bleeding Application of appropriate dressings BURNS Assessment of area Appropriate dressings ADDER BITE Awareness

    Original URL path: http://www.bluedome.co.uk/Assoc/mrc/mrcmed.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • Bluedome
    Wales with funding from the Welsh office From local police authorities These on the recommendation of the Home Office and the Association of Chief Police Officers provide service and licence the greater part of the radio communications equipment used by teams They also provide accident insurance for team members during operations undertaken at their request and during a variable number of training sessions From the Sports Council A small grant is received for training purposes The Ministry of Defence The MOD funds the greater part of the insurance which is required for helicopter training with civilian rescue teams It is clear however that Mountain Rescue has now got to look for additional sources of funding This is due to An increasing work load and an increasing expectation by those injured or lost in the hills An increasing sophistication and cost of equipment A general shortage of money for donations probably due to the current national financial situation It is the wish of almost all those involved in Mountain Rescue that we should continue to provide a free service There would be little chance of collecting a fee from the majority of our clients A great number are either young people

    Original URL path: http://www.bluedome.co.uk/Assoc/mrc/finance.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • Bluedome
    expertise is requested by the Police The British Cave Rescue Council was formed in 1967 as the representative body for all bona fide cave rescue organisations in the British Isles Its functions are to represent and support its members at a national level promote and assist the exchange of information between members and to hold national conferences to consider matters concerning cave rescue To perform these functions it has an

    Original URL path: http://www.bluedome.co.uk/Assoc/mrc/mrccave.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • Bluedome
    high alps should transcend the then national boundaries From this beginning IKAR has progressed over the ensuing decades to body of some twenty one member organisations from sixteen different countries with a further seven associate members who in the main are research technical institutions The basic principle of IKAR is to render rapid effective and efficient assistance to anyone in trouble in the mountains but it is now progressing further within the principle Through co operation and discussion and the combining of knowledge and information it seeks some semblance of standardisation and the continued improvement of rescue techniques and equipment mountain rescue medicine and the evacuation and transportation of casualties by both land and air Preventive publicity as a means of accident prevention is just as important as the rescue aspect In the field of avalanche work it is very much to the fore with the detailed study of avalanche dangers accident prevention and self rescue and the improvement of search and 1rescue techniques for avalanche victims In this field one of its important pieces of work is the standardisation of frequency for avalanche transceivers a major achievement At its working level IKAR comprises of five sub commissions Avalanche Land Rescue Rescue Medicine Air Rescue and Publicity Sub Commissions These sub commissions arrange working party meetings seminars to look at certain areas of study the results of these meetings seminars are then presented at the Annual Delegates Conference The Mountain Rescue Council for England and Wales was admitted to full membership of IKAR in 1982 and is deemed to represent Great Britain However in this respect it does not purport to speak for the other mountain rescue committees namely of Scotland and Northern Ireland on matters of policy and the like It does however provide a vehicle for the dissemination

    Original URL path: http://www.bluedome.co.uk/Assoc/mrc/mrcikar/mrcikar.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • Bluedome
    Hyde Nr Fordingbridge Hants 01425 652470 Eddylines Mile End Mill Llangollen Clwyd LL20 8AD 01978 861444 Four Seasons 44 The Bank Barnard Castle Co Durham DL12 8PN 01833 637829 Gaybo Limited Bellbrook Business Park Uckfield East Sussex TN22 1QU 01825 765891 Kent Canoe Services New House Farm Kemsing Road Wrotham Kent TN15 7BU 01732 886688 Kirton Kayaks Limited Marsh Lane Crediton Devon EX17 1ES 01363 773295 Lendal Products Limited 30 Hunter Street Prestwick Ayrshire KA9 1LG 01292 78558 Marsport UK Limited 215 London Road Reading Berks RG1 3NY 01734 665912 Mobile Adventure Limited Bridge Works Knighton Fields Road West Leicester LE2 6LG 0116 283 0659 North Shore Designs Limited Tanton Hall Farm Stokesley Middlesbrough Cleveland TS9 5JT 01642 710350 Paddlesport Park Farm Estate Compton Verney Nr Stratford on Avon Warwick CV35 9HJ 01926 640573 Palm Canoe Products Limited Harbour Road Portishead Briston BS20 9BL 01275 842740 The P H Company Station Road West Hallam Derby DE7 6HB 0115 932 0155 Peak Performance Unit 23 Cromford Mill Mill Lane Cromford Matlock Derbyshire DE4 3RQ 01629 825133 Plastimo UK Limited School Lane Chandlers Ford Industrial Estate Eastleigh Hants SO53 4JG 01703 262211 Pyranha Mouldings Limited Marina Village Preston Brook Runcorn Cheshire WA7

    Original URL path: http://www.bluedome.co.uk/Assoc/act/actdeal.htm (2016-02-10)
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