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  • Bluedome
    on the tour or any technical problems The traffic is the only problem The views along Loch Linnhe and over to Glen Coe is the major positive factor on this cycle trip The road out of Fort Williams is busy The road is flat until the strait at Corrie The road goes over a hill and enters Loch Leven The bridge across the loch and over Ballachulish Hotel takes you

    Original URL path: http://www.bluedome.co.uk/MoutainBiking/cyclescotland/tour18.html (2016-02-10)
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  • Bluedome
    remoteness of the island also make this a difficult cycle trip Isle Of Skye is indeed a very serious cycle tour But the landscape make this cycle trip an essential cycle trip If there exists a prettier place in Europe I would be most surprised The views along the road is stunning and out of this world I highly recommend this cycle trip Although only 140 km this is a very serious cycle tour There is youth hostels in Broadford Uig and Portree I stayed in the youth hostels in Uig and Broadford I recommend both of them The road from Kyle Of Lochalsh passes the bridge over to Isle Of Skye after five hundred meters The view from the top of this bridge is very impressive The fifteen kilometers long road to Broadford shops and youth hostel is mostly flat The road goes through a small forest and drops down to a small fjord along the island of Scalpay The road round a corner and goes in Loch Ainort to the beginning of a very steep hill which is approx 200 meters high This hill can be avoided by taking the small road around Mor This alternative is moderate hilly I recommend this alternative on the return back again Coming down to Sconser ferry over to Raasay the road goes around a corner into the Loch Sligachan to Sligachan Hotel meals and drinks Take A 863 towards Dunvegan The beginning of the road starts with a small climb and a stunning view towards the Cuillin hills The road goes drops down to Glen Drynoch At the end of this flat valley road to the left for two kilometers to Talisker Distillery and at the beginning of Loch Harport the road rises sharply again up to and over some moorlands

    Original URL path: http://www.bluedome.co.uk/MoutainBiking/cyclescotland/tour19.html (2016-02-10)
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  • Bluedome
    is more infamous than famous among cyclists The weather and the midges is among the factors that make Isle Of Skye infamous The roads are also very very hilly The lack of shops and the remoteness of the island also make this a difficult cycle trip Isle Of Skye is indeed a very serious cycle tour But the landscape make this cycle trip an essential cycle trip If there exists a prettier place in Europe I would be most surprised The views along the road around the Trotternish peninsula is stunning and out of this world I highly recommend this cycle trip Although only 115 km this is a serious cycle tour There is youth hostels in Broadford Uig and Portree I stayed in the youth hostels in Uig and Broadford I recommend both of them The climb out of Uig along A 855 is vertical to the top of the 110 meters above sea level high mountain The cycle trip then goes along a single track road around the north coast of the fantastic Trotternish peninsula The views are stunning If you are early enough you will also meet the ferry from Tarbert The road are reasonable flat until it climb around a corner and drops vertical down to the sea at Duntulm From the sea the road are very hilly down the east coast to Staffin shops pubs The road from Staffin to Portree is extreme hilly and reaches 180 meters above sea level just before Portree The views towards the pinnacle called Old Man Of Storr is very impressive Portree is a charming village town with all the services and shops you need The road from Portree first follows the sea before it start to climb again up Glen Varragil before it drops down to Sligachan Hotel

    Original URL path: http://www.bluedome.co.uk/MoutainBiking/cyclescotland/tour20.html (2016-02-10)
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  • Bluedome
    93 along River Dee is flat and not in particular interesting There is shops at Peterculter Banchory and Aboyne Ballater is most known as the favorite town of the British Royal Family The Balmoral Castle is ten kilometers up the river towards Braemar and Perth It is essential that you shop for drink in Ballater because the next shops are 50 km away After three kilometers from Ballater take the A 939 towards Tomintoul The first ten kilometers follows a valley on a hilly road At the end of this valley the road takes of over a bridge towards Tomintoul and goes into a vertical climb for some hundred meters The road drops down again over a small river before it steady climbs up to it s highest point at 450 meters above sea level Enjoy the scenery and the view across to the horrid hills at the Lecht where you are not heading this time The road drops vertically down to River Don again At the crossroad after the bridge take the road to the right in the direction to Aberdeen The road is flat down to Glenkindie pub and shops where a small hill take you over to

    Original URL path: http://www.bluedome.co.uk/MoutainBiking/cyclescotland/tour21.html (2016-02-10)
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  • Bluedome
    on top of the ridge and cooling off in a stiff NW wind No wonder that it had seemed a little bouncy on the South face I sat on top drunk with exhaustion wondering what to do next Unable to fly down and unwilling to walk the 1000m down into the valley in search of a map and food I pitched the tent washed in a snow melt pool and sat in my sleeping bag watching the sunset and listening to yodel music on my radio Hunger and aching legs made for a poor night s sleep So yesterday had been testing but waking to clear skies right next to a launch site felt like just rewards By 10 am the sky looked perfect for a big flight but I decided to wait until midday before launching to be assured of getting up and away By 11 30 though the sky was building rapidly and I opted to launch before it overdeveloped Unfortunately the NW wind was pushing a cloud street out into the valley blocking the sun from my south facing slope The thermals that had been pumping up steadily from 9 30am were starting to wane and I decided I d better get off quickly I launched into a light breeze and went straight down Luckily there was a pasture 100m below that allowed me to slope land That was a stupid thing to do I told myself Wait until the face is back in sunshine you donut head and so I trudged back to take off with the glider over my shoulder Half an hour later and conditions hadn t changed The whole region was basking in gorgeous sunshine except my mountain The cloud street didn t look like it would shift Encouraged by a sailplane circling above me though I took off again and after a single bleep from the vario sank like a brick back into the same pasture I lost my rag Ranting wildly I tore off the many layers that I was wearing to keep me warm at cloudbase and hurled my helmet into the distance After I had calmed down I packed up the glider and slogged back up the hill for a third attempt There was not a breath on top Time for a re think I needed a plan There were obviously great thermals everywhere except on my mountain I decided that I would have to take a chance and go on a glide to a hillside in the sun This meant committing to one of the two valleys either side of my ridge With nothing else to go on I chose the one with the best looking flying terrain the valley over the back and turned around to lay out on the north side of the ridge Studying the valley I realised that once in it there were no further launch sites It was steep fores St and steep rock If I went down I d either have to

    Original URL path: http://www.bluedome.co.uk/alpineflight/journey.html (2016-02-10)
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  • Bluedome
    G D BORNAND 062 24 7 9 CHAMONIX 095 29 8 10 VERBIER 053 34 9 11 CRANS MONT 042 30 10 12 VISP 098 33 11 13 BRIG 063 10 12 14 FIESCH 038 13 13 15 ANDERMATT 057 44 14 16 CHUR 070 80 15 17 DAVOS 109 17 16 18 KLOSTERS 041 10 17 19 LANDECK 062 61 18 20 IMST 057 16 19 21 GRIES 094

    Original URL path: http://www.bluedome.co.uk/alpineflight/route.html (2016-02-10)
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  • Bluedome
    by turning in circles in exactly the same manner as an eagle or buzzard they will continue to climb gaining more precious altitude The length of the potential flying day is ultimately determined by the amount of time the Sun can continue to heat the ground to that critical temperature at which thermals are caused to trigger Days therefore with thick and total cloud cover do not conventionally bode well for cross country flight and those with rain or snow are a total loss for the paraglider pilot Good cross country flying days stem from those where a number of critical ingredients all dovetail together Chris and Steve will look for a day on which the air is slightly unstable and wanting to rise from ground though too much instability could cause the air to form a storm A day in which the air is basically dry and free from too much early cloud cover allowing the Sun plenty of scope to do its work Overnight temperatures should have also fallen to quite low temperature with an expected high temperature the coming day should ensure that cloudbase is high and well clear of the mountain tops This is especially critical in the Alps to avoid long detours around major massifs or getting trapped within a deep and cavernous Alpine valley system Since paragliding pilots must maintain ground visibility cloudbase is as high as they are allowed to climb Remaining clear of cloud is a solid plan in the Alps since there will likely be some very serious pieces of rock architecture lurking within that grey white wreathed shroud Good flying days will allow Chris and Steve to progress their journey by fifty to eighty kilometres after three or four flying hours To complete their journey they will need between twenty

    Original URL path: http://www.bluedome.co.uk/alpineflight/paragliders.html (2016-02-10)
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  • Bluedome - Walking on the Isles of Scilly - Travel, Skybus, Helicopters
    be loaded correctly This means heavy passengers at the front and lightweights at the back They only seat 8 so it is very cosy The pre flight briefing is given by the pilot who simply turns around in his seat and has a chat The flight time is only fifteen minutes but it transports you further than you might imagine The landing strip at St Mary s is quite visible as the Skybus comes in to land and seems to get very big at an alarming speed don t worry The landing is very smooth Another method of travel to the Isles of Scilly is by boat The Scillonian III is a purpose built ferry that sails between Penzance and Hughtown on the St Mary s The crossing allows passengers to enjoy the dramatic coastal scenery and get a taste of sea air during the 3 hour passage The Scillonian III represents a real lifeline for the islands and it is not unusual to see all manner of items being loaded and unloaded On my crossing the foredeck was crammed with racing gigs following the world championships which are hosted every April The next choice to consider is the helicopter service which flies from Penzance and is operated by British International They operate a regular service and are the only air operator to fly direct to both the Islands of Tresco and St Mary s Flying by helicopter is a slightly expensive choice but if you have not done a helicopter flight before then here is your chance The helicopters are the big Sikorsky S61 which are very comfortable they will also give passengers some great views as they fly out from the airfield at Penzance to the Isles Once you are on St Mary s the choice of travel

    Original URL path: http://www.bluedome.co.uk/scillies/travel.html (2016-02-10)
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