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  • The Ealing Studios Rarities Collection Volume 7 | Blueprint: Review
    In fact I enjoyed two of them very much but overall this is a slight collection so much so that I felt a full individual review for each film would be close to impossible lest I fall into tedious repetition by trying to stretch points about such thin material across a wider frame than it deserves The main offender in this respect is 1937 s Take a Chance a torturously shrill clumsy comedy about horse racing and adultery in which a bored wife passes on too much information about her husband s racehorse to a suitor with ulterior motives It was during my viewing of this painfully dated irritatingly acted clunker that I realised I could not write more than a couple of lines about this particular failed effort While I ve reviewed worse films at length that was because there was plenty to criticise while in Take a Chance there is just so little of anything that all I could do was repeat a chant about its shallow failures Fortunately the rest of the films here were not nearly as excruciating an experience In fact I enjoyed all three to varying degrees even as their various failings were obvious The worst of the remaining three is the amiably amusing Play Up the Band a ragbag of vaudeville turns hung on a thin plot It follows the adventures of the Heckdyke Steam Wagon Works Brass Band as they travel from Yorkshire to the Crystal Palace to play in a prestigious music competition There s some slight nonsense involving jewel thieves but this is secondary to a series of music hall style songs and a couple of the monologues for which Holloway was famous throughout his career Holloway is practically the whole show here although he gets spirited support from the likes of Betty Ann Davies Frank Atkinson and Amy Veness Play Up the Band is perhaps most interesting today as a glimpse of old style entertainment transferred to the screen but it was always done better in the underrated films of George Formby When Formby struck up on his ukulele the audience always got an effectively lively recreation of his legendary live performances for the troops of WWII In Play Up the Band when Holloway starts delivering his trademark monologues and the camera simply holds on him for a lengthy period of time the film grinds to a halt and feels like an unsuccessful attempt to blend two mediums The aforementioned music hall based Ealing comedy Champagne Charlie is a much better attempt at this and stars Holloway in a completely different role showing the versatility of this oft underrated performer More ambitious in scope and successful in tone is Eureka Stockade an attempt to make a National epic about the Australian Gold Rush no less Although it makes a decent attempt to create something expansive and beautiful with its wide open spaces weighty thematic dialogues and lively montages Eureka Stockade still feels very much like a small film its

    Original URL path: http://blueprintreview.co.uk/2013/10/the-ealing-studios-rarities-collection-volume-7/ (2016-04-26)
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  • Shooting Stars | Blueprint: Review
    101 mins British director Anthony Asquith is a highly respected name in film history but how many of his films have most people actually seen I checked my own history with the director and discovered that I have only seen three the slightly ropey wartime comedy drama Cottage to Let and his two most famous films Pygmalion far superior to the more famous My Fair Lady and The Importance of Being Earnest Although these films are beloved of many Brits Asquith is rarely mentioned in lists of great directors and his films tend not to trouble those must see film lists In recent years however a spotlight has been thrown on Asquith s early silent films with A Cottage on Dartmoor being reappraised as an overlooked classic and being given the BFI restoration treatment alongside his second film Underground Fans of these films will be delighted to hear then that the BFI have now released a dual format Blu ray and DVD of Asquith s debut Shooting Stars and it s an absolute gem Largely set in a film studio Shooting Stars is notable for satirising the film industry while it was still essentially in its infancy Asquith chose this subject for his self penned script in anticipation of the gleefully self referential opportunities it would present and while the direction of the film was attributed to A V Bramble it is widely acknowledged that Asquith handled the majority of these duties too Right at the top of the film the opening title card announces Shooting Stars by Anthony Asquith tipping its hat to the film s genuine auteur before the film even begins The clever title has three different meanings in relation to the plot which become clearer as the story progresses For cinema audiences who came to see Shooting Stars without knowing what to expect it begins confounding expectations from the off when what appears to be a corny Western romance quickly degenerates into farce when the lead actress Mae Feather Annette Benson is nipped by a bird she is holding and lets it fly up into the rafters unleashing a tirade of abuse The camera then shows her cowboy lover astride a rickety wooden horse and the illusion is shattered Asquith clearly has a cynical view of Hollywood stars as egotistical phonies and the next scene shows Mae despite having let her true side show on set give a ludicrously preening interview to a journalist in which she portrays herself as a kind loving cultured and saintly presence Asquith who finds many clever ways to get around the overuse of title cards gives the audience the gist of what is being said by showing the journalist s notepad as she writes down key words Later in the film Asquith flashes up the words of a radio broadcast on the screen next to the radio itself without providing a black backdrop for the writing as is customary It allows us to experience the crucial broadcast along with the

    Original URL path: http://blueprintreview.co.uk/2016/03/shooting-stars/ (2016-04-26)
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  • Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead | Blueprint: Review
    Given the obvious connection between the two sources one might expect those who seek out Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead to already be familiar with the Bard s masterwork but many viewers have been drawn to the work through the Stoppard connection alone or else by the central presences of Tim Roth Gary Oldman and Richard Dreyfuss Although I have seen many people online claiming that no prior knowledge of Hamlet is necessary I would have to disagree The story of Hamlet and the tiny part which our heroes play in that text is essential to Stoppard s satire and without any knowledge of this a viewer may be forgiven for seeing Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead as rather pointless and bewilderingly uneventful But those who are unfamiliar with Hamlet need not bow out just yet Although having studied the play will undoubtedly enhance your enjoyment of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead it is perfectly possible to appreciate the film with the more bare bones approach of having read a Wikipedia synopsis of the story first For my own part it has been a long time since I studied Hamlet or saw any of the previous screen adaptations and so I availed myself of this corner cutting recap and found it more than adequate It is somewhat necessary to appreciate the sacred place which Hamlet holds among the literary canon to enjoy the film s humour but few could have escaped the play s overwhelming influence completely It is only those for whom this reputation and Shakespeare in general hold no interest whatsoever whom I would advise that Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead probably isn t for them At the point in his career when he made the film of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead Stoppard had never directed for the screen and currently he never has again but he had worked on numerous film scripts included sterling work on the excellent screenplays for Terry Gilliam s Brazil and Steven Spileberg s Empire of the Sun By contrast Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead is a more visually modest work and yet Stoppard uses the magic of cinema brilliantly to move the play around his central characters rather than the other way around The bewildered central duo frequently find themselves in new destinations with no idea how they got there why there have been brought there and in one of the film s most famous running gags which of them is actually Rosencrantz and which Guildenstern In Hamlet Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are student friends of the Dane asked to spy on him to determine why he has been acting so strangely Their appearances are infrequent and they are unceremoniously despatched at the play s end with the film s titular phrase Stoppard s film then is concerned with how exactly this enigmatic pair occupied themselves for the rest of the time Set largely in the huge empty rooms of Elsinore castle Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead follows Roth and Oldman as

    Original URL path: http://blueprintreview.co.uk/2016/02/rosencrantz-and-guildenstern-are-dead/ (2016-04-26)
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  • Spoiler Podcast Episode 5 - Stoner | Blueprint: Review
    Podcasts Spoiler Podcast Spoiler Episode 8 Dumbo Andy Goulding March 12 2016 Featured Podcasts Spoiler Podcast Spoiler Episode 7 This is England 90 Andy Goulding March 1 2016 Featured Podcasts Spoiler Podcast Blueprint on the LAMBcast Roll Your Own Top 5 David Brook February 15 2016 Featured Podcasts Blueprint on the LAMBcast Best Movies of 2015 David Brook January 7 2016 Featured Podcasts Blueprint on the LAMBcast Star Wars The Force Awakens David Brook December 22 2015 Featured Podcasts Spoiler Episode 6 Melancholia Andy Goulding December 4 2015 Featured Podcasts Spoiler Podcast Blueprint Review Spoiler Podcast Features Recent Haiku Review April 16 admin April 11 2016 Featured Features Haiku Review 4 5 Trash A VHS Festival Justin Richards March 27 2016 Featured Features Reviews 4 5 Interview with Amber Fares Katy Vans March 3 2016 Featured Features Interviews Haiku Review February 16 admin March 3 2016 Featured Features Haiku Review Competition Win Last Shift on DVD David Brook January 18 2016 Competitions Featured Features Interview with Steve Oram admin January 11 2016 Featured Features Interviews Our Favourite Films of 2015 David Brook January 4 2016 Featured Features 2 Comment Haiku Review December 15 admin December 12 2015 Featured Features Haiku Review Competition Win Aferim on DVD David Brook December 8 2015 Competitions Featured Features Competitions Gates of Video Hell Haiku Review Interviews Short Films Weekend of Trash Home Reviews Book Reviews Film Reviews Game Reviews Short Films Soundtrack Reviews TV Reviews Podcasts Blueprint Review Spoiler Podcast Features Competitions Gates of Video Hell Haiku Review Interviews Short Films Weekend of Trash Home Featured Spoiler Podcast Episode 5 Stoner Andy Goulding November 20 2015 Featured Podcasts Spoiler Podcast A new podcast which discusses movies books and TV shows in their entirety without fear of spoilers Presented by Paul Tyler with regular guest

    Original URL path: http://blueprintreview.co.uk/2015/11/spoiler-podcast-episode-5-stoner/ (2016-04-26)
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  • Make More Noise! Suffragettes in Silent Film | Blueprint: Review
    2015 David Brook January 4 2016 Featured Features 2 Comment Haiku Review December 15 admin December 12 2015 Featured Features Haiku Review Competition Win Aferim on DVD David Brook December 8 2015 Competitions Featured Features Competitions Gates of Video Hell Haiku Review Interviews Short Films Weekend of Trash Home Reviews Book Reviews Film Reviews Game Reviews Short Films Soundtrack Reviews TV Reviews Podcasts Blueprint Review Spoiler Podcast Features Competitions Gates of Video Hell Haiku Review Interviews Short Films Weekend of Trash Home Reviews Film Reviews Make More Noise Suffragettes in Silent Film Andy Goulding November 18 2015 Film Reviews Reviews Director Various archive Music Composed By Lillian Henley Year 2015 Country UK BBFC Certification E Duration 72 mins Named after a speech by Emmeline Pankhurst in which she encouraged the suffragettes to make more noise than anybody else the BFI s collection of archival footage of suffragettes from the silent era is well aware of its titular irony and this playfulness is reflected in the choice of material that makes up the film As well as documentary footage of suffragette demonstrations meetings and tragically a funeral that of Emily Davison who famously stepped in front of the King s horse at the 1913 Derby and died of her injuries four days later there are also comedic shorts portraying both early examples of strong independent and rebellious female characters and anti suffragette sentiments For those like myself who have both an interest in early cinema and political activism for equality Make More Noise promises to be a fascinating experience but sadly proves to often be somewhat tedious instead While the captions between each piece of footage do their best to put the film in context most of the clips are unfocused and uneventful This is to be expected of such early footage but even allowing for historical context and given its brief 70 minute runtime Make More Noise is a tough watch Foolishly I had been hoping for some rousing sights but the media s cautious attitude to women s suffrage of course results in fairly bland images most of which are over in a matter of minutes The early silent comedies included to add a splash of lighthearted amusement are largely no less tedious A far cry from the masterpieces of Chaplin Keaton and Lloyd the likes of Did ums Diddles the P liceman and Tilly s Party are glimpses of the chaotic confusing style of the majority of frantic silent comedies Tilly s Party in particular crams the screen with so much activity that it s hard to know where we re supposed to be looking Slightly more interesting are the shocking duo Milling the Militants A Comical Absurdity and Wife the Weaker Vessel the former for its series of punishments meted out to suffragettes as dreamed up by a snoozing man with political ambitions the punishment for embarrassing cabinet ministers is four weeks in trousers and the latter for its shocking scenes of brutal domestic violence for laughs

    Original URL path: http://blueprintreview.co.uk/2015/11/make-more-noise-suffragettes-in-silent-film/ (2016-04-26)
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  • Stop Making Sense | Blueprint: Review
    a way that it almost creates the illusion of narrative Crowd reactions a staple of most concert footage is deliberately avoided until the closing song a tight brilliant rendition of Cross Eyed and Painless in order to allow the viewer to have their own reactions uninfluenced by the coercive partying of screen sanctified spectators It s a wise choice given the amount of hypnotic activity occurring on the stage To tear the camera s eye from this would only frustrate Stop Making Sense opens with the strongly cinematic image of a long shadow preceding a lone man s appearance on a stage Silent throughout these opening moments the film will never again let the volume drop The stage looks stripped down and unimpressive as if the stage dressers were caught in traffic somewhere Byrne informs the crowd that he has a tape he d like to play and for a moment it seems that maybe the rest of the band may be in that same traffic jam Wielding his acoustic guitar and accompanied by the tape s dusty percussion Byrne launches straight into Psycho Killer While it may seem odd to start the set with one of the band s most famous songs it quickly becomes clear that this more minimal composition would not logically fit anywhere else in the set Soon the stage will be teeming with people flailing dancing and strangling every last drop of sound out of a range of instruments vocal chords included But for now it s just us Byrne and one of the defining songs of the 70s One by one the rest of the band enter the sound filling out more and more as they each bring their own personal talent to the table As they do scene shifters begin to bring on more instruments a curtain drops to hide the shabby backstage walls and the tempo picks up These early moments are dominated by songs from the band s trio of 70s albums but with the arrival of extra backing vocalists percussionists and guitarists Talking Heads launch into the material from their then current record Speaking in Tongues an upbeat party album which suffered from tinny production in its studio incarnation but which comes to life in extraordinary fashion on stage to the extent that the live performances immediately replaced their studio counterparts as the definitive versions Tracks like Slippery People and Making Flippy Floppy would never sound better while a cracking version of Burning Down the House mercifully erases the memory of when it was shouted and sweated into pop mediocrity by Tom Jones and the Cardigans This section of Stop Making Sense is perhaps the best building up an infectious head of steam which peaks with Life During Wartime an early track which has its potential unlocked to a degree that it never did on the Fear of Music album A few more unusual songs follow this mid set party The baritone march of Swamp a version of the Byrne

    Original URL path: http://blueprintreview.co.uk/2015/11/stop-making-sense/ (2016-04-26)
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  • Spoiler Podcast Episode 4 - Some Like It Hot | Blueprint: Review
    Andy Goulding March 12 2016 Featured Podcasts Spoiler Podcast Spoiler Episode 7 This is England 90 Andy Goulding March 1 2016 Featured Podcasts Spoiler Podcast Blueprint on the LAMBcast Roll Your Own Top 5 David Brook February 15 2016 Featured Podcasts Blueprint on the LAMBcast Best Movies of 2015 David Brook January 7 2016 Featured Podcasts Blueprint on the LAMBcast Star Wars The Force Awakens David Brook December 22 2015 Featured Podcasts Spoiler Episode 6 Melancholia Andy Goulding December 4 2015 Featured Podcasts Spoiler Podcast Blueprint Review Spoiler Podcast Features Recent Haiku Review April 16 admin April 11 2016 Featured Features Haiku Review 4 5 Trash A VHS Festival Justin Richards March 27 2016 Featured Features Reviews 4 5 Interview with Amber Fares Katy Vans March 3 2016 Featured Features Interviews Haiku Review February 16 admin March 3 2016 Featured Features Haiku Review Competition Win Last Shift on DVD David Brook January 18 2016 Competitions Featured Features Interview with Steve Oram admin January 11 2016 Featured Features Interviews Our Favourite Films of 2015 David Brook January 4 2016 Featured Features 2 Comment Haiku Review December 15 admin December 12 2015 Featured Features Haiku Review Competition Win Aferim on DVD David Brook December 8 2015 Competitions Featured Features Competitions Gates of Video Hell Haiku Review Interviews Short Films Weekend of Trash Home Reviews Book Reviews Film Reviews Game Reviews Short Films Soundtrack Reviews TV Reviews Podcasts Blueprint Review Spoiler Podcast Features Competitions Gates of Video Hell Haiku Review Interviews Short Films Weekend of Trash Home Featured Spoiler Podcast Episode 4 Some Like It Hot Andy Goulding November 6 2015 Featured Podcasts Spoiler Podcast A new podcast which discusses movies books and TV shows in their entirety without fear of spoilers Presented by Paul Tyler with regular guest reviewers Rachael Burnett and

    Original URL path: http://blueprintreview.co.uk/2015/11/spoiler-podcast-episode-4-some-like-it-hot/ (2016-04-26)
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  • Andy Goulding | Blueprint: Review - Part 2
    Haiku Review February 16 admin March 3 2016 Featured Features Haiku Review Competition Win Last Shift on DVD David Brook January 18 2016 Competitions Featured Features Interview with Steve Oram admin January 11 2016 Featured Features Interviews Our Favourite Films of 2015 David Brook January 4 2016 Featured Features 2 Comment Haiku Review December 15 admin December 12 2015 Featured Features Haiku Review Competition Win Aferim on DVD David Brook December 8 2015 Competitions Featured Features Competitions Gates of Video Hell Haiku Review Interviews Short Films Weekend of Trash Home Reviews Book Reviews Film Reviews Game Reviews Short Films Soundtrack Reviews TV Reviews Podcasts Blueprint Review Spoiler Podcast Features Competitions Gates of Video Hell Haiku Review Interviews Short Films Weekend of Trash Author Andy Goulding Andy Goulding Spoiler Podcast Episode 3 Back to the Future Trilogy Andy Goulding October 22 2015 Featured Podcasts Spoiler Podcast This week we re binge watching the entire Back To The Future Trilogy and while there s no argument about the brilliance of the original we ask whether Parts II and III were actually any good or not 2 0 The Nightmare Andy Goulding October 22 2015 Film Reviews Reviews Andy Goulding reviews The Nightmare Rodney Ascher s horror documentary about sleep paralysis 4 0 Love is All Andy Goulding October 15 2015 Film Reviews Reviews Andy Goulding reviews Kim Longinotto s Love is All a collage film devoted to the subject of love with a brilliant soundtrack by Richard Hawley Spoiler Podcast Andy Goulding October 9 2015 Featured Podcasts Spoiler Podcast The podcast which discusses old and new movies books and TV shows in their entirety without fear of spoilers 2 0 Lazarus and Dingwall Andy Goulding October 6 2015 Reviews TV Reviews Andy Goulding reviews short lived BBC comedy series Lazarus and Dingwall

    Original URL path: http://blueprintreview.co.uk/author/madmanmundt/page/2/ (2016-04-26)
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