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  • Weekend Of Trash | Blueprint: Review
    2016 Featured Podcasts Blueprint on the LAMBcast Best Movies of 2015 David Brook January 7 2016 Featured Podcasts Blueprint on the LAMBcast Star Wars The Force Awakens David Brook December 22 2015 Featured Podcasts Spoiler Episode 6 Melancholia Andy Goulding December 4 2015 Featured Podcasts Spoiler Podcast Blueprint Review Spoiler Podcast Features Recent Haiku Review April 16 admin April 11 2016 Featured Features Haiku Review 4 5 Trash A VHS Festival Justin Richards March 27 2016 Featured Features Reviews 4 5 Interview with Amber Fares Katy Vans March 3 2016 Featured Features Interviews Haiku Review February 16 admin March 3 2016 Featured Features Haiku Review Competition Win Last Shift on DVD David Brook January 18 2016 Competitions Featured Features Interview with Steve Oram admin January 11 2016 Featured Features Interviews Our Favourite Films of 2015 David Brook January 4 2016 Featured Features 2 Comment Haiku Review December 15 admin December 12 2015 Featured Features Haiku Review Competition Win Aferim on DVD David Brook December 8 2015 Competitions Featured Features Competitions Gates of Video Hell Haiku Review Interviews Short Films Weekend of Trash Home Reviews Book Reviews Film Reviews Game Reviews Short Films Soundtrack Reviews TV Reviews Podcasts Blueprint Review Spoiler Podcast Features Competitions Gates of Video Hell Haiku Review Interviews Short Films Weekend of Trash Weekend of Trash Home Features Weekend of Trash Weekend of Trash XIX David Brook December 7 2015 Featured Features Reviews Weekend of Trash David Brook enjoys another weekend filled to the brim with action horror and sleaze Weekend of Trash XVIII David Brook September 21 2015 Featured Features Weekend of Trash 4 Comments David Brook reviews the action horror and exploitation movies watched during the latest weekend of trash Weekend of Trash XVII David Brook June 7 2015 Featured Features Weekend of Trash 1 Comment David Brook reviews the pile of genre movies watched during a weekend of trashy movies Weekend of Trash XVI David Brook March 29 2015 Featured Features Weekend of Trash David Brook provides standard and haiku reviews for all the films watched at a Weekend of Trash Weekend of Trash XV David Brook January 18 2015 Featured Features Weekend of Trash David Brook reviews the variety of B movies watched during a weekend of movie thrills spills and sleaze Weekend of Trash XIV David Brook August 4 2014 Featured Features Weekend of Trash David gets together with his pals for a weekend of genre movies running the gamut of trash Weekend of Trash XIII David Brook February 26 2014 Featured Features Weekend of Trash David Brook documents another weekend of genre movies of all shapes and sizes Weekend of Trash XII David Brook August 25 2013 Featured Features Weekend of Trash 3 Comments David provides reviews from his latest and probably last for a while weekend trashy movie marathon Weekend of Trash XI David Brook June 23 2013 Featured Features Weekend of Trash David provides reviews from his latest weekend trashy movie marathon Weekend of Trash X David Brook April 14

    Original URL path: http://blueprintreview.co.uk/category/features/weekendoftrash/ (2016-04-26)
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  • The Ninth Configuration | Blueprint: Review
    his directorial debut released in 1980 The Ninth Configuration is an unusual film that sees military psychologist Col Vincent Kane Stacy Keach sent to a remote mansion where a group of mentally ill and AWOL soldiers are being kept under observation Supposedly the army couldn t fathom why so many of its men were returning home from Vietnam with mental health problems and wanted to see if they were faking or not and what could be done about it in either case Once there Kane finds the patients more troubled than he imagined and following an interesting theory about Hamlet from one of the patients he decides to indulge their strange requests and fantasies One patient in particular catches his interest during this time astronaut Capt Billy Cutshaw Scott Wilson He completely snapped just before being due to pilot a rocket to the moon and now questions the existence of God in amongst his wild behaviour Kane is determined to prove the existence of God to Cutshaw by giving a true example of self sacrifice to help others but in doing so he starts to crack himself From the opening couple of minutes you know this is going to be an odd film A sappy ballad introduces us to Cutshaw in the pre credits scene as he sits looking mournfully out of the rain soaked window of a gothic mansion the asylum in which he s based This then promptly cuts to opening credits running over a shot of a rocket being launched with a huge moon rising up in the background It s a nightmare of course but the jarring juxtaposition of scenes is a sign towards what s to come The film is an unusual mix of brooding psychological thriller theological drama and broad comedy This makes for a unique watch but it doesn t always gel The comedy in particular didn t really work for me There are plenty of witty lines but when placed within the moody atmosphere of the film as a whole they never made me laugh I think the seriousness of the main story arc made the depiction of mental disorder mildly offensive too You don t get the depressing reality of post traumatic stress disorder but rather a cast of oddball characters who dress up like Super Man and attempt to put on Shakespeare plays acted out by dogs In today s more PC times it did stand out for me as feeling quite wrong I wasn t a big fan of Keach s lead performance either His uber deadpan approach was imposed by Blatty according to interviews included on the disc so must have been intentional rather than bad acting but it didn t quite work for me With so little emotion displayed it s hard to care for the character and he just seems too crazy himself from the offset because of this However the film is undeniably intriguing There s a nice double twist before the final act which

    Original URL path: http://blueprintreview.co.uk/2016/04/the-ninth-configuration/ (2016-04-26)
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  • Man With a Movie Camera (and other works by Dziga Vertov) | Blueprint: Review
    s contemporaries Buster Keaton and Harold Lloyd Remember this is long before the days of shock proof mini GoPro cameras too Vertov s operators were using big clunky hand cranked machines The most bonkers example of their use comes in a shot where we see the cameraman operate a camera on the handlebars of a motorbike that he s simultaneously driving in the busy city streets I ve not even mentioned how influential Man With a Movie Camera clearly is to experimental cinema art films documentaries adverts and even music videos That s often what you need to bear in mind when watching silent films to appreciate them but this is so vibrant thrilling and frankly jaw dropping that its importance is more of a side note than a necessity to enjoy the experience Kino Eye Director Dziga Vertov Screenplay Dziga Vertov Country Soviet Union Running Time 78 min Year 1924 Kino Eye is the earliest film in the set although it s still well into Vertov s career who had made dozens of short and a couple of feature documentaries before this When watched now it plays out like a sort of dry run for Man With a Movie Camera giving a slice of life whilst playing with film techniques Rather than chronicle a day in the life of Soviet cities though it s set in a Soviet town village most closely following the activities of the Young Pioneers These were sort of Scouts who on top of learning the usual valuable life skills promoted the work and teachings of Lenin Because of this the film has more of a feel of a propaganda film as do all the rest of the films included in the set This tainted the film and the others a little for me but I still found much to appreciate As mentioned Kino Eye again plays with the possibilities of cinema There are a number of reversed sequences that trace back where things came from For instance we see beef on the market then watch the film reverse as it travels from the slaughter house or back to it when in reverse see the bull being un butchered then see it back in the field with the others There are some great slow motion shots of divers too and a brief animated sequence However there isn t as much experimentation here as in Man With a Movie Camera so it s not as eye popping as that film The pace is much slower too other than in a sequence or two Due to this it s not as engaging as the more famous film but it works as an interesting slice of life documentary in which you can see a director hone his skills ready for his later masterpiece Kino Pravda 21 Director Dziga Vertov Country Soviet Union Running Time 29 min Year 1925 One of a series of newsreels Vertov produced in the mid twenties Kino Pravda 21 commemorates the first anniversary of

    Original URL path: http://blueprintreview.co.uk/2016/04/man-with-a-movie-camera-and-other-works-by-dziga-vertov/ (2016-04-26)
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  • Grey Gardens UK Criterion Collection Blu-Ray Review | Blueprint: Review
    in building a clear narrative over the course of the documentary or digging into any wider reaching issues being thrown up We simply watch bemused as the ageing couple play to the camera in some vain hope to rekindle public interest in their talents Little Edie is the biggest culprit for this parading around the mansion in her makeshift outfits which supposedly have made an impact on the fashion world since but to me look like a toddler has raided her mother s wardrobe Like most documentaries of this ilk then your mileage with it will depend on your interest in the key subjects Personally I found them curiously fascinating Quirky or to put it more bluntly utterly bonkers the pair make for an entertaining watch and I can see why the film has gained a bit of a cult following due to the unusual quotability of the ladies ramblings Their possible mental health problems when matched with their present living situation which is perfectly embodied by their decaying surroundings give an air of sadness to proceedings though so it s not all fun and games It provides a dark view of what happens to those shunned from the higher rungs of society with few practical skills to survive in the real world as well as examining a strange example of the mother daughter relationship The discussion of why Little Edie is still staying at home with her mother often comes up Does Big Edie need her daughter to look after her or vice versa However as fascinatingly odd as the Beales are in the film I did find the structure a little too loose and rambling to keep me fully engrossed Even though it s fairly short I ended up watching it in two chunks although this was largely because I was very tired when I started it so struggled to stay awake The second half seemed to move along more quickly so maybe I just needed to watch the whole film when I was more alert to stay hooked In terms of the approach and quality of the filmmaking the Maysles and co directors Ellen Hovde and Muffie Meyer sensibly keep their mouths shut and noses out to an extent although you do catch glimpses of them here and there and they give the odd comment so the film does feel like a true fly on the wall documentary This gives it a voyeuristic quality but its melancholic and uncomfortable edge set it apart from the sort of celebrity reality shows it likely helped spawn many years later Like those it is clear that the two Edies are playing up for the camera though as mentioned before so you never feel like this is how the pair behave when they re on their own This adds another layer to the documentary though so furthers the intrigue rather than prevents any truths from coming out I haven t given it the highest of ratings due to its meandering nature

    Original URL path: http://blueprintreview.co.uk/2016/04/grey-gardens/ (2016-04-26)
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  • Three Brothers Blu-Ray Review | Blueprint: Review
    with Steve Oram admin January 11 2016 Featured Features Interviews Our Favourite Films of 2015 David Brook January 4 2016 Featured Features 2 Comment Haiku Review December 15 admin December 12 2015 Featured Features Haiku Review Competition Win Aferim on DVD David Brook December 8 2015 Competitions Featured Features Competitions Gates of Video Hell Haiku Review Interviews Short Films Weekend of Trash Home Reviews Book Reviews Film Reviews Game Reviews Short Films Soundtrack Reviews TV Reviews Podcasts Blueprint Review Spoiler Podcast Features Competitions Gates of Video Hell Haiku Review Interviews Short Films Weekend of Trash Home Reviews Film Reviews Three Brothers Jay Cluitt April 8 2016 Film Reviews Reviews Director Francesco Rosi Screenplay Tonino Guerra Francesco Rosi Based by a Novel by Andrey Platonov Starring Philippe Noiret Michele Placido Vittorio Mezzogiorno Charles Vanel Andréa Ferréol Country Italy Running Time 107 min Year 1981 BBFC Certificate 12 When their mother passes away three very different brothers return to their family home to pay their respects but their opposing lifestyles and outlooks on life cause them to clash Italian cinema has a long history with realism with decades of film spent depicting largely depressing dramas generally revolving around families in some form of crisis and Three Brothers is no exception It is a film almost entirely devoid of action or events in general opting instead to focus on the emotional relationships political opinions and inner turmoil of its main characters particularly the eponymous brothers The eldest Raffaele Philippe Noiret is a judge looking to take on a potentially dangerous case involving terrorism that could put himself and his family in jeopardy His wife has just discovered death threats Raffaele has received and is understandably concerned about her husband taking on this case The youngest son Nicola Michele Placido who is around 20 years younger than Raffaele works on a factory assembly line but is often involved in labour disputes occasionally resorting in behaviour his elder brother deems terrorist like Nicola has a young daughter Marta Marta Zoffoli from a marriage that is in turmoil since his wife had an affair Finally the middle brother is Rocco Vittorio Mezzogiorno Rocco works in a youth correctional facility and wants to help the boys in his charge live lives devoid of drugs alcohol and the like Each of these brothers grieves in their own ways but spend far more time ruminating on their own personal problems and having dreams regarding their respective futures with varying degrees of success and happiness These dream sequences were easily the most interesting elements of the film mainly because outside of them very little managed to hold my attention This is for the most part an almost painfully dull film which seems to have no clue where its resolution will lie until a seemingly hastily written in shot at the conclusion The three men each arrive at their childhood home wander around a little reminiscing on their youth and how things have or haven t changed reconnecting with someone they

    Original URL path: http://blueprintreview.co.uk/2016/04/three-brothers/ (2016-04-26)
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  • Ran film review | Blueprint: Review
    fairly big changes though or so I ve been told It sees Tatsuya Nakadai play Hidetora Ichimonji an aging warlord who decides to transfer power over his realm to his three sons Taro Akira Terao Jiro Jinpachi Nezu and Saburo Daisuke Ryû before he dies Saburo doesn t think this is a good idea though and openly tells his father so which Hidetora takes as an insult prompting him to banish and disown his son Taro is then made the chief ruler with Jiro his second whilst their father lives in Taro s castle and retains his title of Lord without having the actual power to rule This set up doesn t last long though as Taro lets the power get to his head swiftly pushing his father aside Matters aren t helped by Taro s wife Lady Kaeda Mieko Harada who is manipulating her husband into making some rash decisions so that she can sit with him as ruler of the castle which had originally been taken by force from her family at the hands of Hidetora Once Taro and Hidetora s relationship goes sour Jiro steps in too to take advantage of the situation and claim the throne for himself So everything descends into a bloody mess of treachery and hunger for power which half way through turns Hidetora into a crazed shell of his former self trapped in a nightmarish hell of his own creation Well this second viewing certainly restored Ran in my mind as the cast iron classic it was always hyped to be It s an astonishingly good film Kurosawa s mastery of the medium is ever present The epic battle scenes are what many discuss when praising the film and yes these are spectacular A central sequence when Hidetora s castle is overthrown by the armies of two of his sons is mind blowing There s an incredible depth to each shot with so much action and layers of smoke and fire assembled in each frame without ever looking messy The use of colour is striking too with the bold primary colours of the sons banners utilised to great effect The first half of this scene plays out with no sound effects either just the orchestral score which gives the scene a stately beauty to counteract the blood and violence on display The quieter scenes are equally as strong too aided by some great central performances Mieko Harada as Lady Kaeda is particularly memorable The scene where she approaches her brother in law after the death of her husband and forces herself on him at knifepoint to sleep with her then marry her is fantastic Mieko has a terrifying menace to her performance and the swift staging of the attack is shockingly aggressive yet gracefully executed at the same time The performances in general and Tatsuya s make up have an air of theatricality to them but I don t mean this as a complaint it seems purposeful and suggests a Noh theatre

    Original URL path: http://blueprintreview.co.uk/2016/04/ran/ (2016-04-26)
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  • Yakuza Apocalypse | Blueprint: Review
    Haiku Review 4 5 Trash A VHS Festival Justin Richards March 27 2016 Featured Features Reviews 4 5 Interview with Amber Fares Katy Vans March 3 2016 Featured Features Interviews Haiku Review February 16 admin March 3 2016 Featured Features Haiku Review Competition Win Last Shift on DVD David Brook January 18 2016 Competitions Featured Features Interview with Steve Oram admin January 11 2016 Featured Features Interviews Our Favourite Films of 2015 David Brook January 4 2016 Featured Features 2 Comment Haiku Review December 15 admin December 12 2015 Featured Features Haiku Review Competition Win Aferim on DVD David Brook December 8 2015 Competitions Featured Features Competitions Gates of Video Hell Haiku Review Interviews Short Films Weekend of Trash Home Reviews Book Reviews Film Reviews Game Reviews Short Films Soundtrack Reviews TV Reviews Podcasts Blueprint Review Spoiler Podcast Features Competitions Gates of Video Hell Haiku Review Interviews Short Films Weekend of Trash Home Reviews Film Reviews YAKUZA APOCALYPSE Neil Gammon April 5 2016 Film Reviews Reviews 1 Comment Director Takashi Miike Screenplay Yoshitaka Yamaguchi Starring Yayan Ruhian Rirî Furankî Hayato Ichihara Den Den Year 2015 Duration 115 min Country Japan BBFC Certification 18 I ve lost track of how many films Takashi Miike has made surely he s close to triple figures by now and as such I haven t seen them all Of those I ve seen there s the ones I love Audition Ichi The Killer and 13 Assassins and quite a few I just didn t get perhaps it s a cultural thing Sadly Yakuza Apocalypse falls into the latter category Set in the Tokyo underworld Yakuza Apocalypse sees warring gangs battling it out with each other although one of the gangs is led by a vampire When the leader is killed his protégé Kageyama who the other Yakuza humiliate because his skin his too sensitive to tattoo is chosen to carry his vampire genes and unwittingly begins to infect citizens turning them also into Yakuza Like many of Miike s films Yakuza Apocalypse is a bizarre assault on the senses The story itself is convoluted enough but as it progresses it just gets weirder and weirder with large narrative jumps and somewhat intriguing characters being introduced There s the vampire killer dragging a child size coffin in an obvious nod to Django and the monster slayer in a frog outfit resembling an oversized kung fu Kermit The main problem with Yakuza Apocalypse is there are too many ideas and as such it doesn t seem to know what kind film it wants to be At times it is ultra violent which will please fans of Ichi The Killer but then it starts to resemble a kids film Yayan Ruhian known best for his role in The Raid movies stars but as an incredible martial artist his skills just aren t put to good use He has one good fight scene but this is cut short There are some well choreographed fights but just not enough for

    Original URL path: http://blueprintreview.co.uk/2016/04/yakuza-apocalypse/ (2016-04-26)
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  • Rocco and His Brothers | Blueprint: Review
    sons Simone Salvatori Rocco Delon Ciro Cartier and Luca Vidolazzi to stay with their oldest brother Vincenzo Focás in Milan However Vincenzo is trying to build his own life there having just celebrated his engagement to Ginetta Cardinale The family are forced to stay in very humble lodgings all sharing one room and not enough beds whilst the boys struggle to find work in the city Eventually the multitude of vices commonplace to city life begin to drive the brothers apart especially by the beautiful yet troubled Nadia Girardot Rocco and His Brothers is basically a soap opera and the problem with soap operas is they never have an end It s the same reason I don t enjoy Richard Linklater s Before franchise as it could conceivably continue in perpetuity never reaching a satisfying conclusion I also hate the two main characters find their whole relationship meaningless and everything they discuss to be naval gazing drivel but that s a topic for another day Here we follow the five brothers and their mother but predominantly Rocco and Simone as their family attempts to live in a new city but there s no sense of a driving narrative No ultimate goal anyone is hoping to achieve Each character has a life they are leading and it impacts the lives of their immediate relatives but not to the extent where arcs are drawn to clear conclusions This is very much a familial character study more so than a traditional narrative which can be frustrating for some What can also be frustrating is how some of these characters behave This film does little to help diffuse the stereotypes of overbearing melodramatic older Italian women and their overtly masculine offspring with every woman over the age of 50 essentially behaving like Doris Roberts in Everybody Loves Raymond An early scene sees Rosario surprising Vincenzo at his engagement party held at Ginetta s family home When it is made clear that Ginetta s family does not have room for so many strangers at such short notice Rosario takes this as a high offence and a family rivalry is immediately instated one that has yet to recede by the end of the film Such histrionics are difficult to comprehend especially when we see other family members suffering through no fault of their own With so many main characters many of whom look quite similar being brothers and all Ciro in particular has a habit of looking like any one of his brothers at any given time it would be understandable to often confuse them with one another but a high point of the film is how well realised the individual characters are and their relationships within the family unit Vincenzo is keen to break away and begin living his own life outside of his mother s influence and becomes burdened by his new family in place of the old one Simone is a hot head strong and impulsive with a flair for boxing and a

    Original URL path: http://blueprintreview.co.uk/2016/03/rocco-and-his-brothers/ (2016-04-26)
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