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  • Waxing a thread and locking it to a needle
    eye and over the point Take your waxed thread with its tapered end and pass it through the eye of your needle Pull enough through to double it over and pass the point of the needle through the middle of the thread The piercing in Fig 2 has been exaggerated for clarity Fig 3 Slide the loop down the needle onto the thread Gripping the pointed end of the needle with one hand slide the pierced thread along the shaft towards the eye with the other The pierced thread should be pulled completely off the needle and onto the main thread Fig 4 The finished item Pull the thread tight and flatten the knot out between thumb and forefinger so that it does not snag when stitching the wax will help here Do not leave too big a loop through the eye it just increases drag when you pull it through the leather You are now ready to start stitching Bowstock Ltd 2013 All right reserved sRecentPrefix onclick ScrollBackRecent Recently Viewed sRecentImageRowPrefix sRecentImageItem sRecentImageRowSuffix sRecentDescRowPrefix sRecentDescItem NAME sRecentDescRowSuffix sRecentPriceRowPrefix sRecentPriceItem sRecentPriceRowSuffix sRecentDeleteRowPrefix sRecentDeleteItem sRecentDeleteRowSuffix sRecentSuffix sRecentEmptyList Free Tutorials Doing the Saddle Stitch Doing the Backstitch Threading a Needle Finishing Edges Make a Paper Pattern Fix and Sharpen an Awl Sharpening Other Tools Leather Carving and Tooling Leather Thickness Chart Making a Strop Best Sellers 18 3 Natural 50g 4 75 Linen thread 18 3 NATURAL undyed rvs polished 50g cop Approx 180 metres find out more Awl harness mounted and sharpened 7 99 A harness awl blade of your choice mounted in an haft then sharpened and polished AH37 AH45 will be mounted in a traditional awl haft AHSAD find out more Hand Stitching Leather Kit 14 95 Learn the saddle stitch and the backstitch Includes awl wax thread harness

    Original URL path: http://www.bowstock.co.uk/acatalog/tanwin.html (2016-04-27)
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  • Finish and Burnish an Edge
    and repeat the process If the leather is very dry it should be dampened slightly on this side to prevent a wrinkled finish If the leather is stiff or thigh enough use a bone folder or rubbing stick to lay down any loose egde fibres This will also help to round off the edge into a curved profile These tools should be applied firmly and rapidly back and forth take care not to push the ends of the work out of shape Fig 2 Using cloth and a peg to apply burnishing fluid to an edge The work is now ready for burnishing You may wish to apply edge dye first but that is not a part of these instructions Make an applicator by folding some sponge or a piece of cloth into a wad and placing it between the jaws of a sprung clothes peg or use a wool dauber Apply edge burnishing fluid to about 100mm of an edge Do not apply more you will find it difficult to get a good finish See Fig 2 Fig 3 Burnishing the edge with a piece of linen Using a piece of linen or canvas held around the edge to prevent curling of the sides rub it to and fro along the treated edge to generate friction and thus heat This will bind down the edge fibres and leave a firm shining edge Multiple layered edges should fuse into one See Fig 3 Fig 4 Only simple tools are required to finish an edge A few simple tools are required to finish an edge you can purchase them here Edge Shaves Bone Folders Gum Edge dyes Wool Daubers polishing tools See Fig 4 Bowstock Ltd 2013 All right reserved sRecentPrefix onclick ScrollBackRecent Recently Viewed sRecentImageRowPrefix sRecentImageItem sRecentImageRowSuffix sRecentDescRowPrefix sRecentDescItem NAME

    Original URL path: http://www.bowstock.co.uk/acatalog/finburn.html (2016-04-27)
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  • Making a Basic Paper Pattern
    Open the paper and lay it flat Use the steel rule to line up two marks across the fold and cut this side of the pattern off Discard the waste See Fig 2 Fig 3 Lining up the remaining two marks 4 Do the same with the other two marks See Fig 3 Fig 4 Marking half of the second dimension You should now have a piece of paper with square edges cut to one of the size limits of the pattern 5 Re fold the paper along the original line and put the fold to the left hand side Use the steel rule and knife to mark HALF of the second of the size limits of the pattern towards the top of the paper Do the same towards the bottom being careful to use the same measurement See Fig 4 Fig 5 Making the final cut 6 Now turn the rule to line up these two new marks and cut off the waste paper Your pattern blank should now reflect the outer limits of the finished item when opened out 7 Re fold the paper the opposite way to the original crease to check that it is accurate You can now use the folded paper to mark out a half design and cut it symmetrically before opening it out and cutting around it See Fig 5 Bowstock Ltd 2013 All right reserved sRecentPrefix onclick ScrollBackRecent Recently Viewed sRecentImageRowPrefix sRecentImageItem sRecentImageRowSuffix sRecentDescRowPrefix sRecentDescItem NAME sRecentDescRowSuffix sRecentPriceRowPrefix sRecentPriceItem sRecentPriceRowSuffix sRecentDeleteRowPrefix sRecentDeleteItem sRecentDeleteRowSuffix sRecentSuffix sRecentEmptyList Free Tutorials Doing the Saddle Stitch Doing the Backstitch Threading a Needle Finishing Edges Make a Paper Pattern Fix and Sharpen an Awl Sharpening Other Tools Leather Carving and Tooling Leather Thickness Chart Making a Strop Best Sellers 18 3 Natural 50g 4 75 Linen thread 18

    Original URL path: http://www.bowstock.co.uk/acatalog/pattern.html (2016-04-27)
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  • Mounting and sharpen an awl blade
    the old hole but hafts are quite cheap anyway See Figs 2 3 Sharpening awl blades Fig 4 The awl blade before bottom and after top sharpening Raw awl blades have been ground to shape and have score marks that often run across the direction of travel when in use They also tend to have extremely fine easily broken points so care must be taken when sharpening Always work in good light and be prepared to spend some time on the task it is always worth it Remove the grinding marks using a fine sharpening stone diamond file or emery cloth Stroke the blade along its length in the direction of use and maintain the diamond shaped profile at all times Hint you can use a stone to remove the fine point of an awl without impairing its effect as long as you maintain very sharp edges and flatten the diamond section slightly near the tip This will render the blade less likely to bend or break if misused or dropped Spearheads are more often leaf shaped than thinly pointed for the same reasons The final stage is to inspect the edges of the blade to ensure they are straight and sharp If not do some more re profiling with the stone When all is correct use the strop to remove the microscopic edge burrs and bring a bright shiny finish to the awl The awl is now ready for use See Fig 4 Hint use the strop to periodically hone the blade and keep it at its best A properly sharpened awl will easily pierce hard leather without snagging or sticking IF ALL ELSE FAILS BOWSTOCK WILL MOUNT SHARPEN YOUR AWL FOR YOU Order a sharpened awl here Bowstock Ltd 2013 All right reserved sRecentPrefix onclick ScrollBackRecent Recently Viewed

    Original URL path: http://www.bowstock.co.uk/acatalog/saa.html (2016-04-27)
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  • Sharpening leatherworking tools
    Before each use fully submerge the whetstone in water and wait until no bubbles no longer escape from the stone This may take up to 20 minutes Use droplets of water during sharpening to cool the blade Water stones cut more quickly than oilstones but do not last as long Usually formed from reconstituted aluminium oxides A short guide to tool sharpening Fig 2 A blunt edge and a symmetrical edge with micro bevel Sharpening involves three distinct activities Grinding Honing and Stropping First the blunted bevel must be ground to the correct angles then honing and polishing with finer abrasives perfects the micro bevel edge See Fig 2 Fig 3 A new bevel at a steeper angle Finally stropping removes the burr left by honing After multiple stroppings and honings the bevel angle will be altered and the edge will not be as good See Fig 3 It is essential to re grind the bevel to the correct angle See Fig 4 Fig 4 A re ground bevel It is important to maintain a constant angle during grinding The same applies when honing a rounded edge will not cut well Keeping a straight edge is a matter of practise and not rushing the job Items such as clothes pegs or paper clips can be clipped over the spine of the blade to act as angle guides against the sharpening stone The flat side of a chisel bevel should be flat A curved edge will never be sharp and will impair the function of the tool The edge is generally pushed towards the grinding surface during this process Use appropriate lubricants during grinding Once correctly ground the edge will have a bead or burr of metal along it that can be turned from side to side with a hone or strop This bead can be felt by gently pushing a fingernail across the blade from the spine towards the edge It is sometimes visibly shiny and bright when held under a good light for inspection SHARPENING EDGE SHAVES Blunt edge shaves leave furry ridged edges that are difficult to rub and burnish Standard edge shaves Polish the underside of a flat shave with a fine polishing stone This will cause a burr along the inside of the cutting slot that can be carefully removed using a piece of fine emery paper folded in two and pulled through the groove The cutting groove of an edge tool can also be sharpened using strong twine with a mixture of cutting oil and grinding paste applied Draw the twine through the groove working away from the tool It is important to maintain the correct profile of the cutting slot and not to enlarge it Hollow or Bevel edge shaves The back edges of these are concave and require the use of specially shaped stones or folded wet and dry emery sheets The grooves can be sharpened using twine as above KNIFE BLADES A blunt knife requires excessive force in use causing poor results

    Original URL path: http://www.bowstock.co.uk/acatalog/sharpen.html (2016-04-27)
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  • Leather Carving and Tooling
    A hard flat surface to work on a heavy marble block is preferred by most toolers A piece of full grain vegetable tanned natural cowhide A piece of sponge and clean water for preparing the leather A swivel knife for cutting the hide A leather nylon or hardwood mallet no heavier than 8oz 227g Bevelling background and stamping tools Tracing or greaseproof paper for the initial design An empty ball pointed pen or stylus for transferring the design onto the leather HINT You can find a basic carving kit at our On line Store Leather tooling a step by step guide Fig 1 Putting a design onto tracing paper Draw your design on the tracing paper or greaseproof paper You may want to trace a design from another un copyrighted source See Fig 1 Fig 2 Sizing the leather with a wool dauber and water Dampen the skin side of the leather evenly across the whole surface with the sponge and water This is called sizing Do not use too much water or you will soften the hide too much Leave the leather for 10 minutes before starting work this allows the fibres to fully absorb the water Do not worry if the leather looks dry at this stage See Fig 2 Fig 3 Transferring the design to the leather Fig 4 The design imprinted upon the leather Place the tracing or greaseproof paper over the skin side of the leather Trace over the whole design with your ballpoint stylus or empty ballpoint pen pressing firmly enough to transfer the design onto the damp leather without breaking through the paper See Figs 3 4 Fig 5 The swivel knife in use Discard the paper and follow all of the lines on the leather with the swivel knife Hold the knife perpendicular to the work and tilt it away from you slightly so that you cut with the corner of the blade only The knife is positioned so that your index finger rests in the U shaped saddle at the top of the handle and the swivelling body is held between your thumb and middle and or ring finger See Fig 5 Fig 6 Turn the knife or the work to maintain a constant cut Fig 7 The fully cut design and a bevel tool Cut only once and cut towards you if possible try not to turn the leather and cut only deep enought to penetrate the grain skin of the hide Turn the knife blade as you follow the line in the leather so that you never stop a cut until you reach the end of a line See Figs 6 7 Fig 8 The bevel tool in use With the leather on the hard work surface use your mallet and a bevelling tool to impress the leather on one side of the design lines only Put the wedged edge of the beveler slightly into the cut made by the swivel knife and tap the tool with the mallet

    Original URL path: http://www.bowstock.co.uk/acatalog/tguide.html (2016-04-27)
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  • Leather thickness chart
    64 11 8 4 4 3 16 12 9 4 8 13 64 13 9 5 2 7 32 14 10 5 6 16 64 15 11 6 0 1 4 16 12 6 4 17 64 17 12 6 7 9 32 18 13 7 1 19 64 19 14 7 6 5 16 20 15 8 0 21 64 21 15 8 4 11 32 22 16 8 8 23 64 23 17 9 2 3 8 24 18 9 6 sRecentPrefix onclick ScrollBackRecent Recently Viewed sRecentImageRowPrefix sRecentImageItem sRecentImageRowSuffix sRecentDescRowPrefix sRecentDescItem NAME sRecentDescRowSuffix sRecentPriceRowPrefix sRecentPriceItem sRecentPriceRowSuffix sRecentDeleteRowPrefix sRecentDeleteItem sRecentDeleteRowSuffix sRecentSuffix sRecentEmptyList Free Tutorials Doing the Saddle Stitch Doing the Backstitch Threading a Needle Finishing Edges Make a Paper Pattern Fix and Sharpen an Awl Sharpening Other Tools Leather Carving and Tooling Leather Thickness Chart Making a Strop Best Sellers 18 3 Natural 50g 4 75 Linen thread 18 3 NATURAL undyed rvs polished 50g cop Approx 180 metres find out more Awl harness mounted and sharpened 7 99 A harness awl blade of your choice mounted in an haft then sharpened and polished AH37 AH45 will be mounted in a traditional awl haft AHSAD find out more Hand

    Original URL path: http://www.bowstock.co.uk/acatalog/sizechart.html (2016-04-27)
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  • Making a strop - a free tutorial
    1 Putting it all together Fig 2 Apply the carborundum paste Glue the leather flesh side up to the handle The fibres of the flesh side will hold onto the carborundum paste or rouge when it is applied Apply the paste or rouge liberally and rub it in well See Fig 2 Your strop is now ready for use Using the strop Fig 3 The finished strop showing signs awl blade polishing You will need to keep a rag or cloth handy to carefully remove any traces of paste from your tools after stropping You can polish awl blades by rubbing vigourously along the strop The blade should be moved only backwards and forwards in the direction of normal use You will feel the micro scratches being removed as the resistance to movement decreases See Fig 3 Knives can be stropped between uses by dragging up and down the length of the strop and flipping the blade over at the end of each stroke Do not lift the blade off the strop when flipping it over Bowstock Ltd 2013 All right reserved sRecentPrefix onclick ScrollBackRecent Recently Viewed sRecentImageRowPrefix sRecentImageItem sRecentImageRowSuffix sRecentDescRowPrefix sRecentDescItem NAME sRecentDescRowSuffix sRecentPriceRowPrefix sRecentPriceItem sRecentPriceRowSuffix sRecentDeleteRowPrefix sRecentDeleteItem sRecentDeleteRowSuffix sRecentSuffix sRecentEmptyList Free Tutorials Doing the Saddle Stitch Doing the Backstitch Threading a Needle Finishing Edges Make a Paper Pattern Fix and Sharpen an Awl Sharpening Other Tools Leather Carving and Tooling Leather Thickness Chart Making a Strop Best Sellers 18 3 Natural 50g 4 75 Linen thread 18 3 NATURAL undyed rvs polished 50g cop Approx 180 metres find out more Awl harness mounted and sharpened 7 99 A harness awl blade of your choice mounted in an haft then sharpened and polished AH37 AH45 will be mounted in a traditional awl haft AHSAD find out more Hand Stitching

    Original URL path: http://www.bowstock.co.uk/acatalog/strop.html (2016-04-27)
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web-archive-uk.com, 2017-12-11