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  • Mucus
    Vale Lottery VOLUNTEER Puppy Socialisers Fundraisers Administration Speakers Regional Groups Apply to volunteer NEWS EVENTS Our News Supporter News The Sniff Magazine Events Challenge Events Canter for a Cure Media Coverage FAQs CONTACT US How to find us Speaker Request Event Attendance DONATE The Dogs Nose Anatomy Mucus Sniffing Volatiles WATCH VIDEO Courtesy of ed ted com WATCH VIDEO The importance of Mucus Why does the dog lick its nose Because mucus is needed The moisture caused by a covering of mucus assists in the collection of odour molecules Odour molecules dissolve in the mucus and are transported in the air breathed in up to the olfactory receptors in the top of the dog s nose If there is not enough mucus the dog licks its nose The average dog produces about a pint of mucus a day Mucus on the tip of the tongue of a small puppy MUCUS is a viscous slippery substance that consists chiefly of mucin water cells and inorganic salts and is secreted as a protective lubricant coating by cells and glands of the mucous membranes MUCIN is a nitrogenous substance found in mucous secretions a lubricant that protects body surfaces Home About us Medical

    Original URL path: http://www.cancerdogs.co.uk/mucus.html (2016-02-16)
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  • Sniffing
    series of rapid inhalations and expirations normally 3 to 10 but possibly up to 30 during which the normal breathing mechanism is disrupted Each nostril sniffs air from separate areas so that during sniffing there is a bilateral scent intake NOTE the lateral slit at the side of the nostril To maximise the efficiency during sniffing the dog needs each sniff intake to be unobstructed Consequently the expired air is passed out through the slits at the side of each nostril creating an air turbulence and allowing new odours to be inhaled directly into the centre of each nostril The alar fold To enable this to happen a structure just inside the nostrils called the alar fold see above opens allowing air to flow through the upper area of the nasal passages When the dog exhales the alar fold closes off the upper part and pushes air down and out through the lateral slits and the tiny wind currents created stir up even morescent particles Watch for small puffs of dust rising up when the dog is sniffing close to the ground Importance of airflow during sniffing A scientific article entitled The fluid dynamics of canine olfaction unique nasal airflow patterns as an explanation of macrosmia by Brent A Craven Eric C Paterson and Gary G Settles 5 explains in detail the mechanics of the airflow to the olfactory system during sniffing In their diagram below the dog s nostril is coloured grey on the left During sniffing the inhaled air in the dog separates into two distinct pathways The upper flow path approximately 12 of each breath and shown in red passes straight to the olfactory region which is connected to the olfactory bulb portion of the brain shown on the right The rest of the air in the

    Original URL path: http://www.cancerdogs.co.uk/sniffing.html (2016-02-16)
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  • Volatiles
    VIDEO What odours indicate disease Dogs detect odours both direct from the source and as residual odours that persist in an area long after the source has left Odour molecules are chemicals that can be dissolved in water and they need to be small enough to be volatile so that they can vaporise and having reached the nose can then be dissolved in mucus The Medical Detection Dogs are trained to discriminate between different Volatile Organic Compounds VOCs In the human the normal metabolic processes are altered in disease and this may result in the production of volatile organic compounds VOCs and these diffuse into the blood stream and are then excreted in breath or in urine 6 Dogs can detect these VOCs at an incredible tiny concentration of 0 001 parts per million 7 However it should be noted that training a dog to detect the odour fingerprint for a particular type of disease among the thousands of odours normally found in a sample of breath urine blood or faeces without recourse to the pure source is extremely challenging 8 In addition the dog has to learn to ignore the vast number of background odours Thus training a Medical Detection Dog is more complex than training a dog to detect explosives or drugs 9 Some of the Medical Detection Dogs trained to detect specific VOCs are shown below WE ARE A MIXED BUNCH 6 Haick H Broza Y Y Mochalski P Ruzsanyi V Amann A Assessment origin and implementation of breath volatile markers Chem Soc Rev 2014 43 1423 1449 D0I 10 1039 c3cs60329f Review article 7 Waggoner L P Jones W Williams M Johnston J M Edge C Petrousky J A Effects of extraneous odours on canine detection In DePersia AT Pennella JJ eds Enforcements and Securities Technologies

    Original URL path: http://www.cancerdogs.co.uk/volatiles.html (2016-02-16)
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  • How our dogs help
    to apply Eligibility Criteria Cerys and Wendy Steven and Molly Karen and Coco Courtesy of ITV Claire and Magic How our dogs help Medical Alert Assistance Dogs are trained to help people with life threatening health conditions giving them greater independence and above all saving their lives on a daily basis Our dogs are trained to assist individuals who manage complex health conditions They are taught to identify the odour changes that are associated with life threatening medical events The avoidance of dangerously low blood sugar levels Hypoglycaemia is an acute daily problem for people with diabetes When accompanied by loss of warnings it has a dramatic effect on the lives of both the person with diabetes and their family Low blood sugar levels are very dangerous if left untreated Symptoms vary from confusion to seizures to comas and can become life threatening Causes of hypo unawareness can include brittle diabetes unpredictable rapidly fluctuating blood sugar levels some medications long term diabetes tightly controlled blood glucose levels An inability to detect a hypo is common in young children and adolescents as a result of their stage of growth and development Recurring hypos can contribute to memory and concentration problems For some people with diabetes deliberately raising their blood sugar levels was the only way to prevent severe hypos We know that high blood sugars over a period of time are likely to cause disastrous consequences including amputations sight loss heart disease strokes and renal failure With their amazing sense of smell our dogs are trained to detect minute changes in blood sugar levels When these levels fall or rise outside the normal range they will warn their owner get help and fetch any vital medical supplies We also provide alert dogs for those with other very dangerous health conditions including

    Original URL path: http://www.cancerdogs.co.uk/how_dogs_help.html (2016-02-16)
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  • Children and Team Dogs
    The Sniff Magazine Events Challenge Events Canter for a Cure Media Coverage FAQs CONTACT US How to find us Speaker Request Event Attendance DONATE Medical Alert Assistance Dogs How our dogs help Personal stories Children Team Dogs Owner Trained Dogs How to apply Eligibility Criteria Cerys and Wendy Steven and Molly Karen and Coco Courtesy of ITV Claire and Magic Photograph by Emma Jeffery Children and Team Dogs Medical Detection Dogs place alert dogs with children who have chronic life threatening health conditions These dogs are known as Team Dogs as they can assist not only the child with their condition but also the parent carer who is responsible for both the care of the child and the dog Please bear in mind it is early days with regards to training and very much work in progress We are finding that when the child is nearer to the age of 7 or 8 that the partnership is likely to be more successful If you would like to apply for a Team Dog please download and complete the following application forms and if diabetic return to us along with your child s last 3 months blood sugar results Download Application Form

    Original URL path: http://www.cancerdogs.co.uk/team_dogs.html (2016-02-16)
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  • Owner Trained Dogs
    stories Children Team Dogs Owner Trained Dogs How to apply Eligibility Criteria Cerys and Wendy Steven and Molly Karen and Coco Courtesy of ITV Claire and Magic Photograph by Emma Jeffery Owner trained Dogs These dogs are trained to assist individuals who manage complex medical conditions on a day to day basis It can be feasible to train an own dog as a Medical Alert Dog However it is also important to be aware that being part of Assistance Dogs UK Europe and International there are standards and temperament criteria that your dog would need to meet to qualify as a working dog such as Guide and Hearing Dogs have to as they will be able to access to public places Therefore there would be no guarantee that your dog would be suitable and would pass the assessment We would advise that you attend Association of Pet Dog trainers APDT training classes and use the Kennel Club s Good Citizenship bronze and silver awards on general obedience This program is very demanding and requires serious commitment If you have a dog that you would like considered for medical alert training please download and complete the following application forms and if

    Original URL path: http://www.cancerdogs.co.uk/owner_trained.html (2016-02-16)
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  • How to apply
    Legacy Our Supporters Vale Lottery VOLUNTEER Puppy Socialisers Fundraisers Administration Speakers Regional Groups Apply to volunteer NEWS EVENTS Our News Supporter News The Sniff Magazine Events Challenge Events Canter for a Cure Media Coverage FAQs CONTACT US How to find us Speaker Request Event Attendance DONATE Medical Alert Assistance Dogs How our dogs help Personal stories Children Team Dogs Owner Trained Dogs How to apply Eligibility Criteria Cerys and Wendy Steven and Molly Karen and Coco Courtesy of ITV Claire and Magic Photograph by Emma Jeffery How to apply We believe that having a Medical Alert Assistance Dog may improve the safety independence and confidence of a person living with a life threatening health condition allowing a better quality of life For further information please contact Simone Brainch our Client Liaison Manager Telephone 01296 655888 Email applications medicaldetectiondogs org uk If you feel you fit the criteria and would like to apply please download and complete the following application forms and if diabetic return to us along with your last 3 months blood glucose results Download Application Form Download Medical Form Diabetes Alert Application Download Medical Form Other Conditions Download Diabetes Questionnaire Home About us Medical Alert Assistance Dogs Cancer

    Original URL path: http://www.cancerdogs.co.uk/how_to_apply.html (2016-02-16)
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  • Eligibility and Criteria
    see the following guidelines which we adhere to in making the decision on who is accepted as an applicant for one of our medical alert dogs 1 Diagnosed with a life threatening health condition for a minimum of at least 12 months 2 Aggressiveness of the condition 3 The current impact of the condition on the applicant s daily life for example the amount of hospital admissions and 999 calls to paramedics made by the applicant 4 Whether the condition as resulted in the client having to give up their employment or in the case of a child has caused regular absences at school 5 The individual s ability to bond with an assistance dog 6 The individual s commitment to the ongoing training with the assistance dog 7 Flexibility to attend the training centre and regular public access training days and to keep the necessary records 9 Geographic Location Although we are national within England Wales and Scotland please note that we are not currently registered in the Channel Isles or Ireland Please also bear in mind however that there are certain locations within England Wales and Scotland where due to sheer distance from our Centre limited funding and resources and the subsequent difficulties that this would cause in terms of being able to give adequate aftercare and support we may have to put an individual s application on hold until such time that we feel that we can offer a full support service 10 Age of Client Normally the applicant must be over the age of 5 years and under the age of 70 The minimum age has been set as we have found that partnerships over this age tend to be more successful and felt it necessary to set the maximum age due to our limited resources

    Original URL path: http://www.cancerdogs.co.uk/criteria.html (2016-02-16)
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web-archive-uk.com, 2017-12-13