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  • DUMP.HTM
    a user declared array ARRAY to the Q1 stack file on leaving the SATELLITE Those values will appear in Q1 when Q1 is replaced by the stack d1 d2 and d3 are the limits in 1 2 and 3 D to be dumped If they are omitted the whole array is scanned for non default values This command works correctly only if DMPSTK T and TALK T otherwise it is just echoed DUMPC Command Not active Dumping field variables DUMPing field variables to files readable by Viewer PHOTON and AUTOPLOT Files of field variables can be dumped from EARTH at selected sweeps and time steps for subsequent plotting by Viewer PHOTON or AUTOPLOT Once dumped Viewer can produce an animated sequence of images which can be saved as a movie file The variables are selected by making the third argument of the OUTPUT command in the Q1 file a Y The frequency of dumping can be controlled by the integers IDISPA IDISPB and IDISPC for sweep staged or time step staged dumping These are PIL variables which can be set in the Q1 file or from the Main Menu Output Field Dumping panel of the Editor For sweep staged dumping CSG1 must be set to SW The files will then carry the names SW1 SW2 SW3 etc in sequence They are used for display purposes not unless the user renames them for re starts For time step staged dumping CSG1 is set to any character which will then be used together with the time step number to create the file names In either case CSG2 can be set to a character used to start the name of the grid file for BFC cases The selection has no effect on the PHI or PHIDA files which are always dumped at the

    Original URL path: http://www.cham.co.uk/phoenics/d_polis/d_enc/dump.htm (2016-02-15)
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  • Reserved Names of Patches or Variables
    2 through east cell face CNN1 outward convection flux kg s of phase 1 through north cell face CNN2 outward convection flux kg s of phase 2 through north cell face CNH1 outward convection flux kg s of phase 1 through high cell face CNH2 outward convection flux kg s of phase 2 through high cell face CONI as for CNE1 for possibly moving body fitted coordinates CONJ as for CNN1 for possibly moving body fitted coordinates CONK as for CNH1 for possibly moving body fitted coordinates CP1 phase 1 specific heat at constant pressure CP2 phase 2 specific heat at constant pressure CTI1 inward convection flux kg s of phase 1 through time face CTI2 inward convection flux kg s of phase 2 through time face CTO1 outward convection flux kg s of phase 1 through time face CTO2 outward convection flux kg s of phase 2 through time face CUTC indicator of whether a cell has cut cell status DEN1 phase 1 density DEN2 phase 2 density DIAM diameter of particle in various two phase models DILA DP1X X direction pressure correction difference DP1Y Y direction pressure correction difference DP1Z Z direction pressure correction difference DRH1 rate of change of log phase 1 density with pressure DRH2 rate of change of log phase 1 density with pressure DU1P rate of change of U1 with pressure difference DV1P rate of change of V1 with pressure difference DVO1 rate of change of log phase 1 specific volume with temperature DVO2 rate of change of log phase 2 specific volume with temperature DW1P rate of change of W1 with pressure difference DU2P rate of change of U2 with pressure difference DV2P rate of change of V2 with pressure difference DW2P rate of change of W2 with pressure difference EFEH EFNE EFNH EL1 mixing length of turbulence for phase 1 EL2 mixing length of turbulence for phase 2 EMIS emissivity also absorptivity of radiant energy per unit volume ENUL laminar viscosity ENUT turbulent contribution to the effective viscosity EOTV Eotvos number used in Ellipsoidal Bubble Clean water Drag correlation EPKE dissipation rate of turbulence energy per unit volume epsilon divided by turbulence energy k EPOT potential no convection or transient terms no turbulent diffusion FONE Damping function in Lam Bremhorst Low Reynolds Number turbulence model FSQ root mean square of composition variable F in Presumed PDF combustion model FTWO as FONE FMU as FONE FOMG multiplier F W in MMK turbulence model FUEL mass fraction of unburned fuel in a simple chemically reacting system SCRS FWD Mass fraction Wood derivative FC Carbon content for wood combustion model FH Hydrogen content for wood combustion model FO Oxygen content for wood combustion model FN Nitrogen content for wood combustion model GEN1 sum of squares of phase 1 velocity gradients GEN2 sum of squares of phase 2 velocity gradients GENK effective viscosity times GEN1 GNK2 effective viscosity times GEN2 H0 1 enthalpy of phase 1 at zero temperature H0 2 enthalpy of phase 2 at zero temperature HTCO heat transfer coefficient derived from wall function HFLX heat flux INTF as for CFIP INTM as for CMDO ISVR for debugging cut cell masking No variables starting J at present KOND the thermal conductivity for phase 1 KND2 the thermal conductivity for phase 2 LEN1 as for EL1 LEN2 as for EL2 LIMB similar to object identifier OBID used for MOFOR LTLS variable solved in order to deduce values of WDIS and WGAP MACH MACH Number of phase 1 fluid MACZ MACH Number based on Z velocity used for parabolic option IPARAB 5 MAC2 Mach Number of phase 2 fluid MARK variable used in InForm to mark cells MAS1 mass of phase 1 in the cell MAS2 mass of phase 2 in the cell MDOT as for CMDO MIXF mixture fraction i e mass fraction of burned or unburned material emanating from the fuel bearing stream in a Simple Chemically Reacting System MIN1 mass of phase 1 entering the cell from outside the domain MIN2 mass of phase 2 entering the cell from outside the domain MXF1 MXF7 mass fraction of material from inlet 1 7 in wood combustion model 7 gasses NUSS Nusselt Number used in two phase interphase heat transfer OBID object identifier used for MOFOR OXID oxidant mass fraction when a Simple Chemically Reacting System is being modelled PDCX cell to cell pressure decrement in x direction PDCY cell to cell pressure decrement in y direction PDCZ cell to cell pressure decrement in z direction PHDE phase 2 diffusion flux in X direction PHDN phase 2 diffusion flux in X direction PHDH phase 2 diffusion flux in X direction POT velocity potential PROD product mass fraction when a Simple Chemically Reacting System is being modelled PRPS material marker PRL Prandtl Number for variables with PRNDTL phi GRND1 PSOX x direction momentum source resulting from the pressure gradient PSOY y direction momentum source resulting from the pressure gradient PSOZ z direction momentum source resulting from the pressure gradient PTOT total pressure P1 0 5 DEN1 VABS 2 based on phase 1 velocity Requires MACH to be STOREd PTO2 total pressure based on phase 2 velocity Requires MAC2 to be STOREd QDX x direction diffusive conductive heat flux derived from gradients of TEM1 or H1 QDY y direction diffusive conductive heat flux derived from gradients of TEM1 or H1 QDZ z direction diffusive conductive heat flux derived from gradients of TEM1 or H1 QRX x direction radiation flux computed by immersol QRY y direction radiation flux computed by immersol QRZ z direction radiation flux computed by immersol RADX net X direction radiative heat flux for 6 Flux model RADY net Y direction radiative heat flux for 6 Flux model RADZ net Z direction radiative heat flux for 6 Flux model REYD Reynolds Number based on interphase slip velocity used in interphase drag laws REYN Reynolds Number in Lam Bremhorst Low Reynolds Number turbulence model REYT Reynolds Number in Lam Bremhorst Low Reynolds Number turbulence model RHO1

    Original URL path: http://www.cham.co.uk/phoenics/d_polis/d_enc/reserv.htm (2016-02-15)
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  • Dynamic Memory Allocation
    the required F array dimension based on the number of variables solved the number of cells and what models are active If more memory is needed than initially allocated each module will expand the relevant arrays as required This is done by making a temporary copy of the array deallocating the original array allocating the new larger array and copying the temporary array into it and deallocating the temporary array On 32 bit systems there may come a stage when there is enough available memory to hold the enlarged array but not enough to hold the temporary copy as well In that case the temporary array is written to disc This introduces a delay in startup typically around 30s each time the array has to be stretched in this way Each time the F array is stretched a local copy of CHAM INI is edited and the current array size is inserted This ensures that the next time the module is run the right memory allocation is made straight away eliminating the stretching The local CHAM INI is saved as part of the VR Editor s Save as a case function and is restored by Open existing case If the grid is very fine there may not be enough memory to hold the array at all resulting in a memory full error This does not relate to the physical ram of the machine but the limited 32 bit address space being used up The only solution is to reduce the number of cells being used This limitation also applies to 32 bit executables running on 64 bit systems The file lunit6 contains a history of the memory allocation of an Earth run The memory allocation history for the Satellite is written to the file lu6pvr If there appears to be

    Original URL path: http://www.cham.co.uk/phoenics/d_polis/d_enc/dynast.htm (2016-02-15)
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  • Q1 GROUPs
    solving a problem involving time dependence the problem specification usually starts with a statement about what values of all the dependent variables pertain to all the points in the space in question at the first instant to be considered These initial values can be supplied among the data items of GROUP 11 Even in problems of steady state character because PHOENICS proceeds in an iterative manner initial values must be supplied These are the first guesses rather than problem specifying data and their values should not ordinarily influence the final solution However they are supplied in precisely the same way as are the initial values of true time dependent phenomena Among the variables which may be initialized in this way are the so called porosities which indicate what fractions of the areas and volumes of the computational cells are actually accessible to the fluid These are not ordinarily dependent variables of differential equations but they may be stored and handled within PHOENICS as though they were Commands CONPOR INIT PATCH RESTRT Logicals INIADD PICKUP Integers FSWEEP IURINI Reals None Real Arrays FIINIT Real flag INIVAL LINVLX LINVLY LINVLZ READFI Characters NAMFI Character flag SOLIDS SKIP see group 13 GROUP 12 Patchwise adjustment of terms in differential equations The above mentioned porosities limit the magnitudes of the relevant fluxes of heat mass and momentum uniformly in respect of all dependent variables However it may be useful sometimes to distinguish one variable from another as when for example a membrane is introduced which is permeable to heat and some constituents of a mixture but impermeable to other constituents Commands PATCH GROUP 12 features GROUP 12 features The following patch names in which stands for any character cause the terms indicated for the variable in question in the region occupied by the patch to be multiplied by the third CO argument of the corresponding COVAL Note that the ampersand symbol as the first character in a patch name is treated as equivalent to GP12 GP12CON all convection terms GP12SOR all built in sources GP12CNE the east face convections GP12CNN the north face convections GP12CNH the high face convections GP12DFE the east face diffusions GP12DFN the north face diffusions GP12DFH the high face diffusions The fourth VAL argument has no significance assigned to it so far These facilities are especially useful when PHOENICS is to be used for fluid flow analysis in one part of a domain and for stresses in solids analysis in another Examples can be found in the active demo series under the heading stress analysis in solids GROUP 13 Boundary and internal conditions and special sources What makes one flow phenomenon differ from another is partly the properties of the medium partly the initial conditions and partly the boundary conditions which despite their name may be located inside the flow domain PHOENICS is therefore supplied in the sections appropriate to data input GROUP 13 with an extensive set of procedures which permit the relevant information to be supplied All such boundary and internal conditions are treated in PHOENICS as sources and sinks therefore the same data input procedures are employed whenever any source sink information is to be transmitted GROUP 13 may thus also be used for representing generation terms in a turbulence energy equation or for introducing novel formulations for chemical reaction rates Commands COVAL INLET OUTLET PATCH WALL VALUE Logicals DARCY XCYCLE Integers IURVAL Reals CORIOL DARCON WALLA WALLB Real flag CELL EAST EWALL FIXFLU FIXP FIXVAL FREEE FREEH FREEN FREEVL GRND GRND1 GRND2 GRND10 HIGH HWALL INFLO LOW LWALL NORTH NWALL ONLYMS OPPVAL OUTFLO PHASEM RGRAD SAME SOUTH SWALL VOLUME WEST WWALL Characters None Character flag SKIP GROUP 14 Downstream pressure for PARAB T PHOENICS can simulate fluid flow phenomena of the kind known as parabolic for example the development of a boundary layer on an airfoil Some of these phenomena require for their complete simulation the specification of the way in which the fluid pressure varies with downstream ie z direction distance GROUP 14 has been provided as the repository of information of this kind Commands None Logicals None Integers IPARAB Reals AZPH PBAR Characters None GROUP 15 Termination of sweeps PHOENICS solves its equations by guess and correct procedures which provided that they are indeed converging cause the imbalances in the finite domain equations to become smaller and smaller There is no limit to the number of cycles of successive adjustments that PHOENICS can perform but there is a limit to how many are worth performing It is for the user to provide PHOENICS with information about the latter limit and GROUP 15 is the place where this provision should be made Commands None Logicals None Integers ISWC1 ISWR1 ISWR2 ITHC1 LITC LITFLX LITHYD LSWEEP Reals None Real arrays RESREF Characters None GROUP 16 Termination of iterations There are iterations of two main kinds in PHOENICS the outer iterations or sweeps which are the concern of GROUP 15 and the inner iterations for which the limiting information is supplied in GROUP 16 The former are concerned with eliminating imbalances deriving from the non linearities while the latter are associated with the fact that PHOENICS uses iterative procedures for solving even the linear equations which arise in large numbers at various points in the solution procedure Commands None Logicals None Integers None Integer arrays LITER Reals None Real arrays ENDIT Characters None GROUP 17 Under relaxation and related devices In order to ensure convergence iterative solution procedures for non linear sets may require the judicious introduction of under relaxation practices For linear equations on the other hand over relaxation may cause convergence to be attained more rapidly PHOENICS possesses several features which allow under and over relaxation to be practised and in a rather discriminating way GROUP 17 is the place at which these devices are normally activated Commands RELAX Logicals None Integers KELIN Integer flag FALSDT LINRLX Reals OVRRLX Characters None GROUP 18 Limits on variables or increments to them During the course of a

    Original URL path: http://www.cham.co.uk/phoenics/d_polis/d_enc/group.htm (2016-02-15)
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  • IDB.HTM
    PRT IDBF0 in SATEAR COMMON RDA5 ENDIT IDBF0 in SATEAR COMMON RDA6 VARMIN IDBF0 in SATEAR COMMON RDA7 VARMAX IDBF0 in SATEAR COMMON RDA8 FIINIT IDBF0 in SATEAR COMMON RDA9 PHINT IDBF0 in SATEAR COMMON RDA10 CINT IDBF0 in SATEAR COMMON LGE1 SOLVE IDBF0 in CMNEAR COMMON LGE2 STORE IDBF0 in CMNEAR COMMON LGE3 PRINT IDBF0 in CMNEAR COMMON LDB1 DBGPHI IDBF0 in SATEAR COMMON GI1 MPHIPR IDBF0 in CMNEAR COMMON GI2 M0PR IDBF0 in CMNEAR COMMON IDA1 ITERMS IDBF0 in SATEAR COMMON IDA2 LITER IDBF0 in SATEAR COMMON IDA3 I0RCVF IDBF0 in SATEAR COMMON IDA4 I0RCVL IDBF0 in SATEAR COMMON IDA5 ISLN IDBF0 in SATEAR COMMON IDA6 IPRN IDBF0 in SATEAR COMMON GH1 NAMEPR IDBF0 in CMNEAR COMMON HDA1 NAME IDBF0 in SATEAR COMMON NPAT NAMPAT IDBF0 COMMON INDAUX INAUX IDBF0 COMMON AUXPRP I1AUX IDBF0 COMMON LGRND LG IDBF0 COMMON IGRND IG IDBF0 COMMON RGRND RG IDBF0 COMMON CGRND CG IDBF0 COMMON LSG LSGD IDBF0 COMMON ISG ISGD IDBF0 COMMON RSG RSGD IDBF0 COMMON CSG CSGD IDBF0 COMMON INDUN IUN IDBF0 IDBF0 PIL integer default 0 group 25 IDBF0 is the numerical location in the IDBCMN common to which a SEARCH is to be applied The numerical location of

    Original URL path: http://www.cham.co.uk/phoenics/d_polis/d_enc/idb.htm (2016-02-15)
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  • Encyclopaedia Index TO BE PROVIDED wbs

    Original URL path: http://www.cham.co.uk/phoenics/d_polis/d_enc/tobe.htm (2016-02-15)
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  • PHOENICS Objects
    to those of the master When the master is moved or re sized all the components are moved or scaled accordingly The Start information lines are crucial as they tell the Editor when the definition of the next component starts POB files can be read from either the current working directory or from any subdirectory of phoenics d satell d object public See also the TR326 entry on ASSEMBLY objects which use the POB file to save the components of an assembly and also the tutorial Working with ASSEMBLY Objects The pob file is not the first to contain both geometric and non geometric information for the geo file produced by the Shapemaker modules did the same Moreover whereas the VR Editor could work only with imported shapes Shapemaker could create them AND assign attributes to the associated objects In order to simplify the user s task the capabilities of both the VR Editor and Shapemaker have been combined so that if the required shape already exists the appropriate dat file will be imported if it does not Shapemaker will be called on to make it even during the VR Editor session required non geometric attributes will be added by way of either Shapemaker or the VR Editor menus as the user finds convenient the resulting Phoenics Object will be stored for future re use in a POB file Section 3 POBs for heating and ventilating PHOENICS provides a library of HVAC related POB files namely diffuser jet fan standing and sitting person perforated plate cabinet These files can be imported modified exported and retrieved through the Object Management Panel in the PHOENICS graphical user interface VR Editor as shown below POB files can be created using either The Shapemaker program or the VR Editor The VR Editor can also import or export assemblies of objects in a single POB file The information stored in a POB file may include Creator s comments The name of the master and individual components Object shape Object size Object position Object type Object material Sources of mass momentum energy species and turbulence energy etc 4 Further new thinking 4 1 Generalising the POB idea by using INCL filename Once it has been recognised that a pob file merely contains a set of object related statements such as appear in Q1 files the possibility of introducing such statements in other ways can be envisaged One such way is the use of the long existing PIL INCL statement Thus if a file called say v100obs htm were to be created which contained the statements regarding the objects of case v100 revealed above by clicking here then those statements could be replaced in the q1 file by the single line INCL v100obs htm The satellite will react to this q1 in precisely the same way as it does to the original one in the sense that the q1ear and eardat files which it produced would be identical Moreover if the lines referring to the domain were

    Original URL path: http://www.cham.co.uk/phoenics/d_polis/d_enc/pob.htm (2016-02-15)
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  • ELEMENT.HTM
    EMENT DI VIDE dir i j The X or Y as specified by dir coordinate of element j will be divided by the X or Y coordinate of element i and a new element will be generated The Y or X coordinate will be that of element i All arguments will be prompted for if not supplied See also HELP on ELEMENT SUBTRACT ELEMENT MULTIPLY ELEMENT ADD ELEMENT MAKE ELEMENTLIST Autoplot Help EL EMENT L IST A list of data elements currently in memory their status on off associated line type file and contents is provided See also HELP on ELEMENT ON ELEMENT OFF ELEMENT SAVE ELEMENTMAKE Autoplot Help EL EMENT MA KE dir n i j This command makes a new data element by choosing a constant value of one coordinate and then taking the values of the other coordinate at that location from a range of existing data elements These values will be stored as the y axis and the x axis will be numbered from 1 to the number of elements used Thus EL MA X 3 1 4 will take the y values from elements 1 through 4 inclusive at the 3rd x location and store them as the new y The x values will be 1 2 3 4 This feature is usefull when one has a number of data sets for different points in time and one wishes to generate a time history at a specific location The element range i j may be specified as ALL All arguments will be prompted for if not supplied See also HELP on ELEMENT SUBTRACT ELEMENT MULTIPLY ELEMENT ADD ELEMENT DIVIDE ELEMENTMULT Autoplot Help EL EMENT MU LTIPLY dir i j The X or Y as specified by dir coordinate of element j will be multiplied by

    Original URL path: http://www.cham.co.uk/phoenics/d_polis/d_enc/element.htm (2016-02-15)
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