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  • The PHOENICS-to-TECPLOT Interface
    reset and what new value is required The main program of the translator TECMAIN HTM is supplied in phoenics d intfac d tecplo to allow for such resizing This should be copied to the user s local directory and compiled A new executable can then be created by running BLDTEC BAT This batch file will link the object of the main program with the object of the body of the code and will also use the NEP library files from phoenics d intfac d genie d nep to create a local copy of TECEXE EXE On UNIX systems the directory structure will be the same but all file names will be lower case and some extensions may differ e g f instead of HTM 4 In TECPLOT 4 1 Data Storage Locations Like many plotting packages TECPLOT assumes that all data is stored at the coordinate locations specified This poses a problem for PHOENICS as in general scalars are cell centered velocities are at cell face centres whilst the grid is defined by cell corners The GENIE interface embodied in NEP deals with this problem by suitably interpolating all values to the cell corners For a general three dimensional grid eight scalars or four velocities are averaged to give a nodal value Special practices are employed at domain edges or adjacent to internal blockages In MB FGE cases the averaging procedure takes into account values from adjacent blocks and allows for many to one links 4 2 Zones Each block of a MB FGE grid is written as a TECPLOT zone As the above mentioned interpolations change the data from its original values each zone can optionally be written twice The first NUMBLK zones contain the interpolated data The second NUMBLK zones contain the original unaltered data located at the cell centres Contours plotted from the interpolated data will fill the solution domain to the edges without the half cell gaps left by PHOTON In MB FGE cases contours will be continuous across blocks for one to one joints For many to one joints the degree to which contours match will depend on how fine the refinement is and how steep the gradients are Contours plotted from the cell centred zones will appear like PHOTON plots with half cell gaps between the last contour or vector point and the edge of the domain For reasonably fine grids the interpolated and cell centre values should give almost identical contours If the two sets of contours are very different this may be an indication that the grid is too coarse to resolve the flow properly anyway 4 3 Vector Plotting The velocities used to construct vectors are chosen according to the problem setup U1 V1 W1 for staggered cartesian UCRT VCRT WCRT for staggered BFC For staggered polar grids cartesian components are constructed UC1 VC1 WC1 for colocated cartesian UCRT VCRT WCRT for colocated BFC For colocated polar grids cartesian components are constructed In all cases the variables written to the TECPLOT

    Original URL path: http://www.cham.co.uk/phoenics/d_intfac/d_tecplo/tec.htm (2016-02-15)
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  • IGES.HTM
    value is negative then the tolerance stored in the IGES file is used NPOINT Number of points before paging occurs limit is 26 000 NLINE Number of lines before paging occurs limit is 26 000 NINTER Number of midline points before paging limit is 26 000 NDIR Number of directory entries before paging NTRANS Number of transforms IPSLIM Both i The maximum number of sections on a parametric spline line

    Original URL path: http://www.cham.co.uk/phoenics/d_polis/d_enc/iges.htm (2016-02-15)
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  • v100
    189000E 00 PRESS0 1 000000E 05 TEMP0 2 730000E 02 CP1 1 005000E 03 ENUL 1 544000E 05 ENUT 0 000000E 00 DVO1DT 3 410000E 03 Group 10 Inter Phase Transfer Processes Group 11 Initialise Var Porosity Fields No PATCHes used for this Group INIADD F Group 12 Convection and diffusion adjustments No PATCHes used for this Group Group 13 Boundary Special Sources No PATCHes used for this Group EGWF T Group 14 Downstream Pressure For PARAB Group 15 Terminate Sweeps LSWEEP 100 RESFAC 1 000000E 03 Group 16 Terminate Iterations Group 17 Relaxation RELAX P1 LINRLX 1 000000E 00 RELAX U1 FALSDT 1 000000E 00 RELAX V1 FALSDT 1 000000E 00 RELAX W1 FALSDT 1 000000E 00 Group 18 Limits VARMAX U1 1 000000E 06 VARMIN U1 1 000000E 06 VARMAX V1 1 000000E 06 VARMIN V1 1 000000E 06 VARMAX W1 1 000000E 06 VARMIN W1 1 000000E 06 Group 19 EARTH Calls To GROUND Station USEGRD T USEGRX T ASAP T SPEDAT SET SATLIT TALK L T Group 20 Preliminary Printout ECHO T Group 21 Print out of Variables OUTPUT P1 Y Y Y N Y Y OUTPUT U1 Y Y Y N Y Y OUTPUT V1 Y Y Y N Y Y OUTPUT W1 Y Y Y N Y Y Group 22 Monitor Print Out IXMON 1 IYMON 2 IZMON 2 NPRMON 100000 NPRMNT 1 TSTSWP 1 Group 23 Field Print Out Plot Control NPRINT 100000 NXPRIN 1 ISWPRF 1 ISWPRL 100000 No PATCHes used for this Group Group 24 Dumps For Restarts NOWIPE T GVIEW P 7 390102E 01 6 736943E 01 0 000000E 00 GVIEW UP 0 000000E 00 0 000000E 00 1 000000E 00 DOM SIZE 1 000000E 01 2 000000E 00 1 000000E 00 DOM MONIT 5 000000E 01 1 000000E 00

    Original URL path: http://www.cham.co.uk/phoenics/d_polis/d_docs/tr006/v100.htm (2016-02-15)
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  • An Example POB File
    00000E 00 6 60720E 01 9 73465E 01 1 00000E 00 6 29410E 01 9 82963E 01 1 00000E 00 5 97545E 01 9 90393E 01 1 00000E 00 5 65263E 01 9 95722E 01 1 00000E 00 5 32702E 01 9 98929E 01 1 00000E 00 5 00000E 01 1 00000E 00 1 00000E 00 4 67298E 01 9 98929E 01 1 00000E 00 4 34737E 01 9 95722E 01 1 00000E 00 4 02455E 01 9 90393E 01 1 00000E 00 3 70590E 01 9 82963E 01 1 00000E 00 3 39280E 01 9 73465E 01 1 00000E 00 3 08658E 01 9 61940E 01 1 00000E 00 2 78856E 01 9 48436E 01 1 00000E 00 2 50000E 01 9 33013E 01 1 00000E 00 2 22215E 01 9 15735E 01 1 00000E 00 1 95619E 01 8 96677E 01 1 00000E 00 1 70327E 01 8 75920E 01 1 00000E 00 1 46447E 01 8 53553E 01 1 00000E 00 1 24080E 01 8 29673E 01 1 00000E 00 1 03323E 01 8 04381E 01 1 00000E 00 8 42652E 02 7 77785E 01 1 00000E 00 6 69873E 02 7 50000E 01 1 00000E 00 5 15636E 02 7 21144E 01 1 00000E 00 3 80602E 02 6 91342E 01 1 00000E 00 2 65349E 02 6 60720E 01 1 00000E 00 1 70371E 02 6 29410E 01 1 00000E 00 9 60736E 03 5 97545E 01 1 00000E 00 4 27757E 03 5 65263E 01 1 00000E 00 1 07054E 03 5 32702E 01 1 00000E 00 0 00000E 00 5 00000E 01 1 00000E 00 1 07054E 03 4 67298E 01 1 00000E 00 4 27757E 03 4 34737E 01 1 00000E 00 9 60736E 03 4 02455E 01 1 00000E 00 1 70371E 02 3 70590E 01 1 00000E 00 2 65349E 02 3 39280E 01 1 00000E 00 3 80602E 02 3 08658E 01 1 00000E 00 5 15636E 02 2 78856E 01 1 00000E 00 6 69873E 02 2 50000E 01 1 00000E 00 8 42652E 02 2 22215E 01 1 00000E 00 1 03323E 01 1 95619E 01 1 00000E 00 1 24080E 01 1 70327E 01 1 00000E 00 1 46447E 01 1 46447E 01 1 00000E 00 1 70327E 01 1 24080E 01 1 00000E 00 1 95619E 01 1 03323E 01 1 00000E 00 2 22215E 01 8 42652E 02 1 00000E 00 2 50000E 01 6 69873E 02 1 00000E 00 2 78856E 01 5 15636E 02 1 00000E 00 3 08658E 01 3 80602E 02 1 00000E 00 3 39280E 01 2 65349E 02 1 00000E 00 3 70590E 01 1 70371E 02 1 00000E 00 4 02455E 01 9 60736E 03 1 00000E 00 4 34737E 01 4 27757E 03 1 00000E 00 4 67298E 01 1 07054E 03 1 00000E 00 5 00000E 01 0 00000E 00 1 00000E 00 5 32702E 01 1 07054E 03 1 00000E 00 5 65263E 01 4 27757E 03 1 00000E 00 5 97545E 01 9 60736E 03 1 00000E 00 6 29410E 01 1 70371E 02 1 00000E 00 6 60720E 01 2 65349E 02 1 00000E 00 6 91342E 01 3 80602E 02 1 00000E 00 7 21144E 01 5 15636E 02 1 00000E 00 7 50000E 01 6 69873E 02 1 00000E 00 7 77785E 01 8 42652E 02 1 00000E 00 8 04381E 01 1 03323E 01 1 00000E 00 8 29673E 01 1 24080E 01 1 00000E 00 8 53553E 01 1 46447E 01 1 00000E 00 8 75920E 01 1 70327E 01 1 00000E 00 8 96677E 01 1 95619E 01 1 00000E 00 9 15735E 01 2 22215E 01 1 00000E 00 9 33013E 01 2 50000E 01 1 00000E 00 9 48436E 01 2 78856E 01 1 00000E 00 9 61940E 01 3 08658E 01 1 00000E 00 9 73465E 01 3 39280E 01 1 00000E 00 9 82963E 01 3 70590E 01 1 00000E 00 9 90393E 01 4 02455E 01 1 00000E 00 9 95722E 01 4 34737E 01 1 00000E 00 9 98929E 01 4 67298E 01 1 00000E 00 1 00000E 00 5 00000E 01 1 00000E 00 5 00000E 01 5 00000E 01 0 00000E 00 5 00000E 01 5 00000E 01 1 00000E 00 288 195 2 1 195 42 1 2 99 98 42 196 98 99 196 42 195 3 2 195 42 2 3 100 99 42 196 99 100 196 42 195 4 3 195 42 3 4 101 100 42 196 100 101 196 42 195 5 4 195 41 4 5 102 101 41 196 101 102 196 41 195 6 5 195 41 5 6 103 102 41 196 102 103 196 41 195 7 6 195 40 6 7 104 103 40 196 103 104 196 40 195 8 7 195 40 7 8 105 104 40 196 104 105 196 40 195 9 8 195 39 8 9 106 105 39 196 105 106 196 39 195 10 9 195 39 9 10 107 106 39 196 106 107 196 39 195 11 10 195 38 10 11 108 107 38 196 107 108 196 38 195 12 11 195 38 11 12 109 108 38 196 108 109 196 38 195 13 12 195 37 12 13 110 109 37 196 109 110 196 37 195 14 13 195 37 13 14 111 110 37 196 110 111 196 37 195 15 14 195 36 14 15 112 111 36 196 111 112 196 36 195 16 15 195 36 15 16 113 112 36 196 112 113 196 36 195 17 16 195 35 16 17 114 113 35 196 113 114 196 35 195 18 17 195 35 17 18 115 114 35 196 114 115 196 35 195 19 18 195 34 18 19 116 115 34 196 115 116 196 34 195 20 19 195 34 19 20

    Original URL path: http://www.cham.co.uk/phoenics/d_polis/d_docs/tr006/pob1.htm (2016-02-15)
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  • PHOENICS-related Lectures
    the 21st century 2000 Turbulence models for the 21st century Part 2 2001 St Petersburg Fluid flow and solid stress by a single algorithm 2004 Melbourne PHOENICS User Conference CONWIZ the Convergence Promoting Wizard 2004 Melbourne PHOENICS User Conference Computer Simulation of Fluid Solid Interactions 2004 Minneapolis Eckert Memorial Lecture 2008 Marrakech Conference Enlarging the frontiers of computational heat transfer 2008 Moscow Third International Symposium HMT H in Swirling flow

    Original URL path: http://www.cham.co.uk/phoenics/d_polis/d_lecs/leclist.htm (2016-02-15)
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  • Documentation
    may be viewed by clicking below PHOENICS Overview TR 001 html Starting with PHOENICS VR TR 324 html The PHOENICS VR reference guide TR 326 html In Form TR 003 html Material properties in PHOENICS TR 004 html What s new in PHOENICS TR 006 html Release Notes for current version TR 327 html FLAIR User Guide TR 313 html CVD User Guide TR 314 html GENTRA User Guide TR

    Original URL path: http://www.cham.co.uk/phoenics/d_polis/d_docs/tr000/tr000.htm (2016-02-15)
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  • Application classes
    2 Environmental Applications Recent Older Atmospheric pollution Pollution of natural waters Safety Fire spread 3 Architecture and building science External flows Flow in a football stadium 1 and 2 Flow around a bus shelter Pollutant dispersion near a tower block Pollutant dispersion within a passenger terminal Dispersion of ammonia spill within a city complex Flow around a group of buildings Flow around in line wind turbines Internal flows Airport terminal

    Original URL path: http://www.cham.co.uk/phoenics/d_polis/d_applic/applic.htm (2016-02-15)
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  • In-Form4.htm; the Input of Data by way of Formulae
    the laminar kinematic viscosity Laminar viscosities of fluids vary in complex ways for which so many formulae are to be found in the literature that it would be impossible to build them all into PHOENICS In Form however enables them to be introduced easily Here for example is one which has been recommended for saturated water property enul is 1 0e7 exp 1 1246 0 012557 tem1 1 72 9679e 3 tem1 In Form handles this without difficulty PRNDTL varname IPROP 7 the Prandtl Number thermal conductivity or material exchange coefficient The Encyclopaedia entry PRANDTL explains how this variable and the corresponding variable for the turbulent contribution PRT are used and interpreted by PHOENICS PRNDTL varname can be set by In Form but not PRT varname The reason is that if ever anything more complex than a constant PRT varname is required it is simplest to set PRT varname to zero and to use In Form s great flexibility to set a single formula which expresses both the laminar and turbulent contributions PHINT varname IPROP 8 and 9 the interface value for a first or second phase variable Interface values of temperature when heat transfer is in question and of concentration when mass transfer occurs have to be expressed in many different ways in accordance with the circumstances Often it can be presumed that the two phases are in thermodynamic equilibrium at the surface Examples are Heat transfer when there is neither mass transfer eg vaporization or condensation nor chemical reaction eg catalytic oxidation of a gaseous fuel In this case the interface temperatures of both phases are equal to the weighted by the heat transfer coefficients average of the local bulk temperatures of the two phases Vaporisation of a liquid into its own vapour In this case the interface temperature is a function of the local pressure often expressed by way of the Clausius Clapeyron equation Vaporisation of a liquid into a gas In this case the gas phase interface concentration of the vaporising material is a function of the interface temperature and the local pressure The temperature has to be computed by way of a local energy balance in which the latent heat of vaporization plays an important part Combustion of carbon particles in air at high temperature In this case the concentrations of oxygen and carbon dioxide on both sides of the interface can be taken as zero the interface temperature then depends on a heat balance involving the rates of mass transfer of oxidant to the surface conductive heat transfer to the interior of the particle convective heat transfer to the bulk of the gas radiative heat transfer to the surroundings and the heat generated by the chemical reaction In Form enables all such relationships to be expressed with ease TMP1 IPROP 10 the temperature of the first phase derived from the solved for enthalpy Even though temperature differences are the driving force for heat transfer by conduction and radiation when convection is dominant it is often convenient to employ the enthalpy as the solved for variable because contributions of simultaneous mass transfer may be taken easily into account Therefore from its earliest days PHOENICS has been equipped with means for deducing the fluid temperature from solved for values of the enthalpy H1 The earlier means of doing so are explained by the Encyclopaedia entry for TMP1 TMP2 IPROP 11 the temperature of the second phase derived from the solved for enthalpy What has been written about TMP1 applies also to TMP2 with the obvious changes EL1 IPROP 12 the mixing length scale of the first phase fluid The ways in which distributions of this variable can be set by way of built in coding can be learned from the relevant Encyclopaedia entry Inspecting that entry will reveal that although much is provided that provision is still meagre in comparison with what users may reasonably require For example selecting EL1 GRND8 activates the Nikuradze formula in terms of the y coordinate But what if it is the x direction which measures the distance from the wall More GROUND coding would prior to PLANT and In Form have had to be introduced In Form allows such a desire to be easily satisfied by writing in the Q1 file an expression such as the following property el1 is xulast 0 14 0 08 1 2 0 xg xulast 2 0 06 1 2 xg xulast 4 Moreover any other desired expression can be provided without any enquiry as to what coding has been built in EL2 IPROP 13 the mixing length scale of the second phase fluid What has been written about EL1 applies of course also to EL2 CP1 IPROP 14 the specific heat of the first phase The PHOENICS Encyclopaedia contains articles on CP1 and on specific heats at constant pressure Both make reference to the fact that PHOENICS can compute temperatures in two different ways either directly by solving for TEM1 or TEM2 in which case the enthalpy if it appears at all is a derived quantity or indirectly by solving for the enthalpy H1 or H2 in which case it is the temperature which has to be derived as was explained in the above discussion of TMP1 Because of the necessity to effect these derivations swiftly and in both directions PHOENICS makes use of an effective specific heat concept defined in a non standard manner which however facilitates the easy deduction of enthalpy from temperature and of temperature from enthalpy The effective specific heat can be regarded as an average value for the range of temperature from a reference value to the prevailing temperature Care must therefore be used when using published data to establish the definition of the specific heat which the publication employs The specific heat data in the library case 089 are NOT at the time of writing consistent with the PHOENICS definition Translation into PHOENICS terms remains to be accomplished However the error entailed by forgoing the translation will be

    Original URL path: http://www.cham.co.uk/phoenics/d_polis/d_enc/in-form4.htm (2016-02-15)
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