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  • In-form8.htm
    follows the linear trajectory crossing the one from right to left It has the constant velocity component of 10 m s in X direction and 3 m s in Y direction The movement starts from the initially steady position defined in the Q1 file The description the hierarchy part is not mandatory as two moving objects move inside one root coordinates system Therefore it is enough only to define the position of moving objects in each time step The movement of SPHERE1 object is along diagonal of XY plane X and Y coordinates of moving object are described as vel 10 gravt 9 81 MOVOB of SPHERE1 is POS tim vel tim vel 0 5 gravt tim 2 0 0 0 0 The movement of SPHERE2 object is along X axis from right to left X coordinates of moving object are described as MOVOB of SPHERE2 is POS tim vel 0 0 0 0 0 Connected objects falling of a cracked wall The case exemplifies the setting up the attributes for the connected movements of two objects following their relative rotation in 2D Y Z computational space The movement of the first object called BLOCK starts from its stationary position as a vertical wall with its base placed next to the middle of the bottom domain boundary BLOCK is allowed to fall It does so by rotating clockwise about X axis of its south high corner The angular velocity of the fall is 5 degrees per second Initially the second smaller object TIP sits stationary on the top of BLOCK and can be regarded as a part of the wall Once the whole wall starts to fall it cracks and TIP begins to move in opposite direction by rotating counterclockwise about X axis of the north low corner of the BLOCK The angular velocity of the TIP relative to the BLOCK is 180 degree per second The hierarchy part is described as follows MOVOB of BLOCK is OFFSET 0 0 2 1 MOVOB of TIP is OFFSET 0 2 5 0 5 with PARENT BLOCK Two frames are defined BLOCK is a parent joint and TIP is the BLOCK s child The OFFSET of BLOCK defines the position of the rotation axis relative to the root frame it places the origin of parent related coordinate frame at the south high corner of BLOCK initial position The OFFSET of TIP defines the position of the rotation axis relative to the BLOCK frame it places the origin of its coordinate frame at the north low corner of BLOCK initial position The movement of BLOCK object is a rotation clockwise about X plane Rotation angle is described as MOVOB of BLOCK is POS 0 0 0 75 tim 0 0 The movement of SPHERE2 object is a rotation counterclockwise about X plane X coordinates of moving object are described as MOVOB of TIP is POS 0 0 0 180 tim 0 0 Agitated reactor Impellers are the units one most commonly associates with stirred reactors The particular design considered here consists of the ROD mounted on rotating vertical SHAFT The rod carries two PADDLEs which agitate the flow As the impeller rotates it forces the surrounding fluid to rotate with it The design with rotating paddles is used when in depth mixing is a must The task of the exercise is to provide the attributes for connected movements of SHAFT ROD PADDLEs assembly following their relative rotation in 3D computational space The angular velocity of the shaft is 60rpm The hierarchy part is described as follows MOVOB of CHAM is OFFSET 0 0 0 MOVOB of SHAFT is OFFSET 0 15 0 25 0 25 with PARENT CHAM MOVOB of ROD is OFFSET 0 0 0 with PARENT SHAFT MOVOB of PADDLE1 is OFFSET 0 0 0 with PARENT ROD MOVOB of PADDLE2 is OFFSET 0 0 0 with PARENT PADDLE1 Four frames are defined SHAFT is a parent joint and ROD PADDLE1 and PADDLE2 are the SHAFT s children The OFFSET of SHAFT defines the position of the rotation axis relative to the ROOT frame it places the origin of parent related coordinate frame at the middle of the SHAFT bottom face of its initial position The ROD and PADDLEs rotate about the same axis and has no freedom to move relatively to SHAFT The OFFSETs of ROD and both PADDLEs are zero The movement of SHAFT object is a rotation clockwise about X plane Rotation angle is described as MOVOB of SHAFT is POS 0 0 0 360 tim 0 0 8 3 Moving In Form objects Introduction As has just been seen In Form s MOVOB keyword enables the motion of VR objects to be described then activation of MOFOR sets the fluid in motion However even before the existence of MOVOB In Form had a means of causing its own In Form objects to move and to move the fluid with them How this works will now be illustrated The fluid motion is achieved by attaching momentum sources to the In Form objects This was not in evidence when the MOVOB keyword was being used but such sources were being introduced nevertheless behind the scenes Studying the source statements associated with moving In Form objects therefore throws some indirect light on how MOFOR works Contents Moving spheres Moving blades Moving valve Football trajectory 2D Football trajectory 3D a Moving spheres So the 765 library case sets the linear motion of two hot spherical bodies to follow a horizontal path as char xce yce zce radius xce 5 5 tim 100 1 yce 0 1 01 tim 100 1 zce 05 radius 25 INFOB at FIRST is SPHERE xce yce zce radius with INFOB 1 xce 5 25 tim 100 1 yce 1 5 zce 05 radius 25 INFOB at SECOND is SPHERE xce yce zce radius with INFOB 2 It should be noted that the INFOB statement can contain several long formulae These can be spread over several lines in the Q1 file with a symbol as the last character of a line acting as a continuation marker When the Q1 file is rewritten at the end of an interactive section lines longer than 68 characters will be automatically folded with a at column 68 In the setting of long formulae it is recommended to use intermediate symbolical variables as shown above The maximum possible length of a formula in any In Form statement is 1000 symbols Heat sources within In Form objects are represented thus SOURCE of TEM1 at FIRST is 100 with INFOB 1 SOURCE of TEM1 at SECOND is 100 with INFOB 2 b Moving blades The 770 library case set steady rotated In Form object for simulation two paddle stirred reactor The rotated paddle is describes by In Form REAL ANGVL ANGVL 4 PI 1 Number of revolutions 1 s REAL X0 Y0 X0 0 5 Y0 0 5 X and Y coordinate of centre of impeller char ang dx1 dx2 dy1 dy2 ang ANGVL TIM dx1 hsid2 SIN ang dx2 hsid1 COS ang dy1 hsid2 COS ang dy2 hsid1 SIN ang INFOB at PATCH1 is BOX x0 dx1 dx2 y0 dy1 dy2 0 0 1 0 7 10 0 0 ang with INFOB 1 The cartesian components of paddle velocity are set SOURCE of U1 at PATCH1 is ANGVL YG Y0 with INFOB 1 FIXV SOURCE of V1 at PATCH1 is ANGVL X0 XG with INFOB 1 FIXV c Moving valve The inclined linear motion of rectangular object is submitted in 784 library case Here four immobile In Form objects 1 2 3 and 4 describe the geometry of blading sections of the chamber INFOB at WHOLE is BOX 0 07 0 04 03 1 0 0 0 with INFOB 1 INFOB at WHOLE is BOX 07 0 0 03 04 1 0 0 0 with INFOB 2 INFOB at WHOLE is BOX 04 07 0 05 03 1 0 0 PI 4 with INFOB 3 INFOB at WHOLE is BOX 07 04 0 03 05 1 0 0 PI 4 with INFOB 4 Each of them is a solid body with appropriate installations inside objects STORED of VPOR at WHOLE is 0 with INFOB 1 SOURCE of U1 at WHOLE is 0 with INFOB 1 FIXV SOURCE of V1 at WHOLE is 0 with INFOB 1 FIXV STORED of VPOR at WHOLE is 0 with INFOB 2 SOURCE of U1 at WHOLE is 0 with INFOB 2 FIXV SOURCE of V1 at WHOLE is 0 with INFOB 2 FIXV STORED of VPOR at WHOLE is 0 with INFOB 3 SOURCE of U1 at WHOLE is 0 with INFOB 3 FIXV SOURCE of V1 at WHOLE is 0 with INFOB 3 FIXV STORED of VPOR at WHOLE is 0 with INFOB 4 SOURCE of U1 at WHOLE is 0 with INFOB 4 FIXV SOURCE of V1 at WHOLE is 0 with INFOB 4 FIXV Two next In Form objects 5 and 6 describe the geometry of a valve and a valve holder Description of a geometry of a valve X and Y coordinates of a valve in the first time step REAL XVAL YVAL XVAL 0 065 YVAL 0 035 Moving of a valve during one time step REAL DMOV DMOV THROW LSTEP DMOV DMOV 1 414 INTEGER HLS HLS1 HLS2 HLS LSTEP 2 HLS1 HLS 1 HLS2 HLS 2 CHAR CXP CYP CXP XVAL DMOV HLS ABS ISTEP HLS1 CYP YVAL DMOV HLS ABS ISTEP HLS1 INFOB at WHOLE is BOX CXP CYP 0 01 042 1 0 0 PI 4 with INFOB 5 Description of a geometry of the valve holder X and Y coordinates of the valve holder in the first time step REAL DXH DYH DXH 0 0113 DYH 0 0252 INFOB at WHOLE is BOX CXP DXH CYP DYH 0 01 11 1 0 0 PI 4 with INFOB 6 Fixation of the valve velocities into valve SOURCE of U1 at WHOLE is UP with INFOB 5 FIXV SOURCE of V1 at WHOLE is VP with INFOB 5 FIXV Fixation of the valve velocities into valve holder SOURCE of U1 at WHOLE is UP with INFOB 6 FIXV SOURCE of V1 at WHOLE is VP with INFOB 6 FIXV d Football trajectory 2D The 766 library case illustrates the use of the In Form SPHERE function to simulate the effect on the motion of the air of a football following a prescribed parabolic trajectory The In Form object is presented as char xce yce zce radius gravt vel times gravt 9 81 vel 14 14 times tim xce 0 5 times vel 1 414 yce 0 5 times vel 1 414 0 5 gravt times 2 zce 05 radius 5 INFOB at PATCH1 is SPHERE xce yce zce radius with INFOB 1 Where xce yce and zce are the x z and z coordinates They are character variables which are evaluated in the In Form statements because they are enclosed within colons Setting of U1 and V1 values into SPHERE is char usour vsour usour vel 1 414 vsour vel 1 414 gravt times SOURCE of U1 at PATCH1 is usour with INFOB 1 FIXV SOURCE of V1 at PATCH1 is vsour with INFOB 1 FIXV e Football trajectory 3D The modeling of motion of spherical object in 3D space is submitted in 767 library case The In Form object is presented as char xce yce zce radius gravt vel times gravt 9 81 vel 14 14 times tim xce 0 5 times vel 1 414 0 5 gravt times 2 yce 0 zce 0 5 times vel 1 414 radius 5 INFOB at PATCH1 is SPHERE xce yce zce radius with INFOB 1 Setting of U1 V1 and W1 values into SPHERE is char usour wsour usour vel 1 414 gravt times wsour vel 1 414 SOURCE of U1 at PATCH1 is usour with INFOB 1 FIXV SOURCE of V1 at PATCH1 is 0 with INFOB 1 FIXV SOURCE of W1 at PATCH1 is wsour with INFOB 1 FIXV 9 Print out related capabilities 9 1 LONGNAME Variables which are introduced by way of In Form statements beginning STORED are computed at each sweep through the solution domain However it sometimes occurs that values are required only for print out purposes In these cases In Form makes use of the longname feature which slightly pre dates In Form itself Syntax The syntax of longname statements can be deduced from the following example extracted from Input library case 763 The LONGNAME feature provides reminders at RESULT reading time LONGNAME of L3RH print as 3 Piece Wise Linear Density LONGNAME of L3EN print as 3 Piece Wise Linear Viscosity LONGNAME of L3CP print as 3 Piece Wise Linear Specific Heat LONGNAME of L3CN print as 3 Piece Wise Linear Conductivity This illustrates the use of longname as a reminder which will be printed in the RESULT file as a field values title of what formula has been used for the calculation of density and other properties The similarity of the property and longname entries in this example should not however lead to the supposition that their treatment by PHOENICS is similar On the contrary whereas what follows is in the property statement must a meaningful formula that in the longname statement can be any string of characters Equally acceptable for example would be LONGNAME of VISL is my new formula 9 2 PRINT Another feature for a dump of variables values in a separate file is the PRINT In Form statement It prints fields of standard dependent variables or of user defined single real variables calculated by Formula in an INFOROUT file which it places in the working directory Its format is PRINT String 15 at PatchName is Formula where String 15 is a character name with a length of 15 symbols PatchName is the name of a PATCH or VR object The length of String 15 together with PatchName is limited 15 symbols according to SPEDAT format The String 15 string is a comment of dumping variables Examples of use are make pinlet make user defines single real variable store1 of pinlet is old p1 1 1 1 with if isweep eq 1 define pinlet print of pin is pinlet dump in INFOROUT file the pinlet value stored of pold is old p1 with if isweep eq 1 calculate POLD variable print of p1 old is pold dump in INFOROUT file the fields of POLD The 362 and 363 library cases use for a print out of user defined single real variables ASUM and TSUM PRINT of Whole high area is ASUM PRINT of IZ NZ Sum TEM1 is TSUM 9 3 Coefficients residuals corrections and exchange coefficients gammas Contents Coefficients residuals corrections exchange coefficients gammas manipulating coefficients Coefficients Users who are interested in the finite volume equations solved by PHOENICS may print and manipulate terms which enter those equations The typical form these equations is seen by clicking here The terms which may be accessed are the north south east west high and low coefficients aN aS aE aW aH aL aP which is added to the denominator and S which is the so called residual i e the current imbalance in the equation The In Form statements which enable them to be accessed have the form STORED of name is A X varname where name is the name chosen by the user for the coefficient in question for example E V1 if the east coefficient of variable V1 is in question X is N S E W etc according to the coefficient which is required and varname is the name of the solved for variable which is in question i e V1 in the just mentioned case A complete set of examples can be found in input library case 788 Residuals The equation imbalances i e the residuals may be obtained in a similar manner but for them the In Form Statement is STORED of name is RESI varname Such statements are also to be seen in case 277 Corrections Solving the finite volume equations produces corrections i e quantities which should be added cell by cell to the values of the solved for variables in order to reduce the imbalances in the equations To gain access to them the appropriate statement is STORED of name is CORR varname Examples of accessing residuals and corrections are to be found in library cases 249 concerned with 2D flow in a square cavity and 768 concerned with 3D flow in a water heater If on line click here for the temperature field the residual field and the correction field for case 249 Because the solution is well converged the values of both the residuals and the corrections are very small This accounts for the irregularity of the residual field of which the values have been reduced to the round off error of the computer This method of displaying residuals and corrections is more convenient than the older established method which involved giving the variable of which residuals and corrections were required a special name ending with the sign That method however is still available Warning It will sometimes occur that the corrections are printed as zero The explanation is that the iterative computation will have stopped before the prescribed value of LSWEEP because the residuals had fallen below the reference value therefore the solver which is where the corrections are computed may not have been entered The cure is to set NPRINT to some value well below that of the number of sweeps at which solution terminated Exchange coefficients gammas Also of interest to those who study the workings of the numerical solution process are the exchange coefficients i e diffusivities times densities which enter together with convection contributions into the calculation of aN aS aE aW etc These too may be accessed by way of an In Form statement which is in this case STORED of name is

    Original URL path: http://www.cham.co.uk/phoenics/d_polis/d_enc/in-form8.htm (2016-02-15)
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  • In-Form APPENDIX 1
    735 core library cases See also MAX arg1 arg2 function of maximum calculation The function has 2 arguments which are constants or stored variables or formulas Examples are 706 778 779 and 781 core library cases MIN arg1 arg2 function of minimum calculation The function has 2 arguments which are constants or stored variables or formulas Examples are 706 740 741 778 and 779 core library cases NETS arg1 arg2 function of sum of nett source calculation The function has 2 arguments which are the name of dependent variable and the name of the object or of the patch command Example is 672 core library cases NORTH arg1 function of calculation of value at neighbouring cell beside north face The function has 1 argument which is a stored or solved variable NORTH arg1 is equivalent of arg1 1 See also OFFSET arg1 arg2 arg3 function describes the hierarchy part of the MOFOR attribute settings OFFSET is a special In Form function for defining the frames of reference of object related coordinate systems Each new OFFSET function declares a new frame coordinate system and describes its position relative to its parent system The arg1 arg2 and arg3 are formulas for calculation of coordinates of the origin position of the rotation axis relative to its parent This function is used in MOVOB In Form statement only See also OLD arg1 function of calculation of value at previous time step The function has 1 argument which is a stored or solved variable Examples are 368 and 786 core library cases PLANE arg1 arg2 arg3 arg4 arg5 arg6 arg7 arg8 arg9 arg10 function of creating plane sub grid object The function has 10 arguments where first 9 agruments are coordinates of three triangle vertexes and 10th is a thickness of plane sgo In general case all arguments can be the formulas Example is 385 core library cases POINT arg1 arg2 arg3 arg4 function of creating point sub grid object The function has 4 arguments where arg1 arg2 arg3 are the x y and z coordinates of the point SGO position and arg4 is the diameter of point SGO In general case all arguments can be the formulas POL2 arg1 arg2 arg3 arg4 function of calculation of the polynomial by next formula arg2 arg1 arg3 arg1 arg4 The function has 4 arguments where arg1 may be a constant or a stored solved variable but arg2 arg3 and arg4 must be constants Example is 089 core library case See also POL3 arg1 arg2 arg3 arg4 arg5 function of calculation of the polynomial by next formula arg2 arg1 arg3 arg1 arg4 arg1 arg5 The function has 5 arguments where arg1 may be a constant or a stored solved variable but arg2 arg3 arg4 and arg5 must be constants Examples are 089 701 and 763 core library cases See also POL4 arg1 arg2 arg3 arg4 arg5 arg6 function of calculation of the polynomial by next formula arg2 arg1 arg3 arg1 arg4 arg1 arg5 arg1 arg6 The function has

    Original URL path: http://www.cham.co.uk/phoenics/d_polis/d_enc/infapp1.htm (2016-02-15)
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  • In-Form APPENDIX 2
    at region described by PATCH command with PatchName name by Formula calculated at moment before print out For a designation variable field is used a expression of the formula Var is any 3D stored variable The with Options element contains options which specify the action of statement INFOB n for moving InForm object IMAT iprp in cell with material number iprp IF condition general logical condition If it is necessary only to use a long name without accounts by the Formula the following statement is possible LONGNAME of Var as Long Name where Long Name is characters string without blanks TGRI D of Var at PatchName is Formula with Options sets a account of Var variable at region described by PATCH command with PatchName name by Formula calculated The account begin at moment before calling of second group of GROUND Var is any 3D stored variable or some EARTH reals The with Options element contains options which specify the action of statement INFOB n for moving InForm object IMAT iprp in cell with material number iprp IF condition general logical condition XGRI D of Var at PatchName is Formula with Options sets a account of Var variable at region described by PATCH command with PatchName name by Formula calculated The account begin at moment before calling of third group of GROUND Var is any 3D stored variable or some EARTH reals The with Options element contains options which specify the action of statement INFOB n for moving InForm object IMAT iprp in cell with material number iprp IF condition general logical condition YGRI D of Var at PatchName is Formula with Options sets a account of Var variable at region described by PATCH command with PatchName name by Formula calculated The account begin at moment before calling of fourth group of GROUND Var is any 3D stored variable or some EARTH reals The with Options element contains options which specify the action of statement INFOB n for moving InForm object IMAT iprp in cell with material number iprp IF condition general logical condition ZGRI D of Var at PatchName is Formula with Options sets a account of Var variable at region described by PATCH command with PatchName name by Formula calculated The account begin at moment before calling of fifth group of GROUND Var is any 3D stored variable or some EARTH reals The with Options element contains options which specify the action of statement INFOB n for moving InForm object IMAT iprp in cell with material number iprp IF condition general logical condition MAKE of Var is Formula declare storage of user defined VAR single real variable Its initial values are calculated by Formula The length of Var name should not be more than 8 symbols MOVOB of VRObName is Formulas with PARENT VRPar Name sets a position of moving VR object with VRObName name by Formulas calculated This statement is used for the MOFOR purposes The PARENT VRPar Name option set the name of parent reference of object

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  • In-Form Appendix 3
    minus the current value This option is used only in the SOURCE statement GAMCOF dictates that the formula should be evaluated at the moment of calculation of the exchange coefficients This option is used with the GAMM function only in the STORED statement The option is created by Satellite automatically if the formula contains the GAMM function HIGH notes the cell face where diffusion or convection terms of finite volume equitions can be modified This option is used only in the MODDIF and MODCON statements It can be specified together with EAST and NORTH options IF condition dictates that the formula should be evaluated only when and where condition is true The format of the condition expression is the same as that of Fortan This option can be used in all In Form statements IMAT iprp dictates that the formula should be evaluated only for cells where the PRPS variable which indicates the material index IMAT is equal to a prescribed value iprp This option can be used in all In Form statements Other possible relations between IMAT and iprp may be expressed as IMAT iprp greater than iprp IMAT iprp less than value iprp IMAT iprp greater than or equal to iprp IMAT iprp less than or equal to iprp IMAT iprp not equal to iprp INFOB n dictates that the formula should be evaluated only for cells occupied by the In Form formula set object with n number n is a positive integer number This option can be used in all In Form statements ITHSTR means that the formula should be evaluated at the start of the hydrodynamic iteration This option is used only in the STORED statement ITHFIN means that the formula should be evaluated at the finish of the hydrodynamic iteration This option is used only in the STORED statement LAMW AL dictates that the source calculated by the formula is to be multiplied by the surface area times the relevant laminar exchange coefficient viscosity for velocities thermal conductivity for temperature etc This option is used only in the SOURCE statement and for patches of wall type LINE dictates that the value of the source is to be linearised with respect to the dependent variable in question This option is used only in the SOURCE statement At should be used whenever the formula implies that the source diminishes when the dependent variable increases LOGL dictates that the source calculated by the formula is to be multiplied by the surface area times the relevant effective exchange coefficient viscosity for velocities thermal conductivity for temperature etc calculated from the logarithmic profile formula This option is used only in the SOURCE statement and for patches of wall type NORTH notes the cell face where diffusion or convection terms of finite volume equitions can be modified This option is used only in the MODDIF and MODCON statements It can be specified together with EAST and HIGH options ONLY MS dictates that the source calculated by the formula is to be

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  • In-Form Appendix 4
    slab cell DZRAT is DZ DZL EL1 is the mixing length scale of the first phase fluid EL2 is the mixing length scale of the second phase fluid EMISS is the emission and absorption coefficient of a transparent medium ENUL is the reference laminar kinematic viscosity ENUT is the turbulent kinematic viscosity FIXFLU is 2 0E 10 a coefficient recognized in the third argument of COVAL to be used to indicate a fixed flux condition FIXP is 1 0 a coefficient name recognized in the third argument of COVAL to be used when the external pressures are fixed FIXVAL is 2 0E10 a coefficient name recognized in the third argument of COVAL to be used to indicate a fixed value condition FSTEP is the first time step size FSWEEP is the number of first sweep GREAT is 1 0E20 a large number used in EARTH GRND is 10110 0 a special flag GRND1 is 10120 0 a special flag GRND2 is 10130 0 a special flag GRND3 is 10140 0 a special flag GRND4 is 10150 0 a special flag GRND5 is 10160 0 a special flag GRND6 is 10170 0 a special flag GRND7 is 10180 0 a special flag GRND8 is 10190 0 a special flag GRND9 is 10200 0 a special flag GRND10 is 10210 0 a special flag INDVAR is the number of current dependent variable IRUN is the current run number IDRH1 is the compressibility of the phase 1 fluid IDRH2 is the compressibility of the phase 2 fluid IDVO1 is the volumetric coefficient of thermal expansion of the phase 1 material IDVO2 is the volumetric coefficient of thermal expansion of the phase 2 material ISPH1 is the specific heat of the phase 1 material ISPH2 is the specific heat of the phase 2 material ISTEP is the time step number ISWEEP is the current sweep number ITHYD is the current iteration number at the current z slab IXF is the west extent of the current patch IXL is the east extent of the current patch IYF is the south of the current patch IYL is the north of the current patch IZ or IZSTEP is the grid point location in the z direction LEN1 is the length scale of phase 1 LEN2 is the length scale of phase 2 LITHYD is the maximum number of hydrodynamic iteration LSGLN is the length of a part of line sub grid object which is located in a cell The number of In Form object should be specified in INFOB flag of In form statement LSGTL is the total length of line sub grid object The number of In Form object should be specified in INFOB flag of In Form statement LSTEP is the maximum number of time steps a transient flow simulation LSWEEP is the maximum number of iterative sweeps MASS1 is the mass of phase 1 MASS2 is the mass of phase 1 NRUN is the maximum number of runs in a multi run calculation NX

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  • SPEDAT.HTM
    permitted since PHOENICS 3 1 to replace SET by S or even to omit it and the comma which follows it altogether 2 The GROUND coding Fortran statements for getting the data The reading and interpretation of the EARDAT line in EARTH requires the presence usually in a GROUND subroutine of the following line or its equivalent CALL GETSPD NEW IDEA NEW VARIABLE 1 RVAL IVAL LVAL CVAL IERR Warning Here the quotes are essential Then the real variable RVAL will be set equal to 1 1E4 The third argument indicates which of the four following arguments is to be taken as follows REAL value via RVAL INTEGER value via IVAL LOGICAL value via LVAL and CHARACTER value via CVAL Because the GETSPD command has rather many arguments it is sometimes preferable to use whichever is appropriate of the following four subroutines in the GROUND Fortran file GETSDR CONTEXT VARNAME RVAL for real variables GETSDI CONTEXT VARNAME IVAL for integer variables GETSDL CONTEXT VARNAME LVAL for logical variables GETSDC CONTEXT VARNAME CVAL for character variables 3 How the data are transmitted to EARTH At the time of creating the EARDAT file the PHOENICS Satellite module writes the SPEDAT data as indicated in the following examples in which the first integer indicates how many following lines are to be read by EARTH An example of special print out commands Click here for more 10 PRINT NUMBER I 5 PRINT COMMAND1 CTOTAL TEMP PRINT COMMAND2 CPOW TEMP C1 PRINT POWER R 5 00000E 01 PRINT COMMAND3 CMINMAX U1 PRINT COMMAND4 CAVE C1 PRINT COMMAND5 CVALUE V1 PRINT IXLOC I 5 PRINT IYLOC I 5 PRINT IZLOC I 1 An example of grid creation commands 16 GRIDS CASE CBOX GRIDS XCMIN R 0 00000E 00 GRIDS XCMAX R 1 00000E 00 GRIDS YCMIN R 0 00000E 00 GRIDS YCMAX R 2 00000E 00 GRIDS ZCMIN R 0 00000E 00 GRIDS ZCMAX R 3 00000E 00 GRIDS TFCXMX R 1 10000E 00 GRIDS TFCXMN R 1 00000E 00 GRIDS TFCYMX R 1 10000E 00 GRIDS TFCYMN R 1 00000E 00 GRIDS TFCZMX R 1 10000E 00 GRIDS TFCZMN R 1 00000E 00 GRIDS DXCDZC R 0 00000E 00 GRIDS DYCDXC R 0 00000E 00 GRIDS DYCDZC R 0 00000E 00 Some data which users provide by way of the Virtual Reality Editor are transmitted in the same way even though the SPEDAT commands do not appear in the Q1 file Part of a corresponding EARDAT sequence follows 98 OBJNAM SOIN1 CSOIN1 IGESTYPE SOIN1 CUSER DEFINED OBJNAM SOIN2 CSOIN2 IGESTYPE SOIN2 CUSER DEFINED OBJNAM DILUIN CDILUIN IGESTYPE DILUIN CUSER DEFINED OBJNAM IZ4 CIZ4 IGESTYPE IZ4 CUSER DEFINED OBJNAM XSECIN1 CXSECIN1 IGESTYPE XSECIN1 CUSER DEFINED OBJNAM XSECIN2 CXSECIN2 IGESTYPE XSECIN2 CUSER DEFINED OBJNAM OB1 CX1 IGESTYPE OB1 CNULL OBJNAM OB2 CY1 IGESTYPE OB2 CNULL OBJNAM OB3 CY3 IGESTYPE OB3 CNULL OBJNAM OB4 CZ4 IGESTYPE OB4 CNULL OBJNAM OB5 CZ5 IGESTYPE OB5 CNULL OBJNAM OB6 CCMP2 IGESTYPE OB6 CBLOCKAGE 4 Examples of the use of SPEDAT GETSPD

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  • ASAP.HTM
    all and of course the same information could be conveyed to EARTH from a phi file in a restart run If it is sources which are to be conveyed the result of ASAP s work is the filling of a three dimensional array of sources of the variable in question This is an array which does not ordinarily find a place in PHOENICS except in the GENTRA option All ASAP sources are at the present time of the fixed flux variety Linearised sources could be introduced if the need arose as could sources of a more complex kind for example those which depend on several local variables Formulae for these sources could be introduced in a PLANT like manner but this has not yet been done 2 4 Creating the GEOMDA file the ASAP language a Key words The GEOMDA file is an ASCII file which can be created by means of any editor or word processor Two such files are shown in sections 3 1 and 3 2 respectively The first relates to a cylinder and the second to a Tee junction They are both short and once a few simple rules have been recognised easy to understand The language of ASAP has very few words of its own they are in alphabetical order AERO FOIL BOX CHAIN CONE CONSTANT COORDINATE CYLINDER ELLIPSOID END END OF GROUP EOF FIRST CHAIN GROUP POINT SOURCE POLY PIPE POLY SURFACE PROPERTY SOLID These words are refered to as key words All are fully explained in Apendix 1 b Other words Not all key words are used in every file Thus the file of section 3 1 uses only COORDINATE CYLINDER END OF GROUP EOF GROUP PROPERTY while that of section 3 2 uses additionally BOX CONSTANT END END OF GROUP POLY SURFACE However non ASAP words ie those introduced by the user are also to be found They are of three kinds namely the names of constants which follow the CONSTANT keyword for example HEIGHT in the file of section 3 2 the names of objects or collections of objects which follow the GROUP keyword eg THE CYLINDER in that of section 3 1 any words which follow placed in the first two columns which words are ignored by ASAP but serve to aid the user s understanding in the capacity of comments or remarks c Conventions ASAP is not case sensitive but it is useful to adopt the convention that words to which ASAP responds are upper case while comments are lower case Blank lines may be inserted in GEOMDA files without having any effect Every line which is neither blank nor a comment must be complete in itslf continuation from one line to the next is not permitted Indentation is significant to ASAP When it occurs as in the GEOMDA of section 3 2 the rule is always move four spaces left or right Most ASAP readable lines are of the form key word followed by a sequence of numbers However any number may be replaced by a previously declared constant and the GROUP key word is followed by a user chosen name d Objects At present eight classes of object are available They are Object class ASAP keyword rectangular boxes aligned with the grid BOX circular sectioned cylinders CYLINDER elliptical sectioned cones which may be truncated CONE ellipsoids ELLIPSOID cylinders of arbitrary uniform cross section AERO FOIL arbitrary 3D shapes SOLID pipes of any cross section with bends POLY PIPE point source of mass momentum energy etc POINT SOURCE The key word must be followed by the numbers 1 or 2 according to whether the PROPERTY value is to be applied inside or outside the surface of the object The number is called the type of the object e Material indicators What material is to be associated with the object whether inside or outside its surface is indicated by the number following the preceding PROPERTY key word These numbers correspnd to the values of the PHOENICS variables PRPS to be found in the PROPS file Thus in the GEOMDA files of sections 3 1 and 3 2 PROPERTY 111 signifies that the material is steel In the visual display distinct colours are associated with each material That of steel is blue Note The colour to materials associations are currently fixed by an inaccessible data statement This will be changed The PROPERTY value governs all objects below it in the GEOMDA file until the next PROPERTY line is reached f Constants and other GEOMDA features It is often convenient to replace numbers by names of variables eg HEIGHT as in the section 3 2 GEOMDA The variables need to be first declared and assigned values by lines beginning with the keyword CONSTANT Thus PROPERTY 111 could be replaced by CONSTANT STEEL 111 PROPERTY STEEL Further details of this and all other features of the ASAP language used in GEOMDA files are fully described in Appendix 1 No further explanations will be provided in the body of the text 2 5 How to attach the GEOMDA file to the Q1 file The GEOMDA file described above can be read directly by the ASAP However it is strongly recommended that the GEOMDA file created is attached to the corresponding Q1 file The advantages of this practice are twofold a GEOMDA files will never be mixed up with irrelevant Q1 files b this enables the user to create a ASAP library which contains both the PIL settings and the geometry data for each case To attach a GEOMDA file to the corresponding Q1 file the user should insert cg 8 Q1 at the bottom of the Q1 file right before the STOP statement this causes the ASAP to read the Q1 file and to search the geometry data from it otherwise the ASAP will read the GEOMDA file for the geometry data input insert the flag starting from third column after the statement cg 8 Q1 insert the flag starting from third column after the flag insert the entire contents of the GEOMDA file between the flag and the flag move in the entire contents of the geometry data statements two columns Note that the maximum length in the Q1 file is 68 An example of the Q1 file can be found in Appendix 1 2 6 Interactive viewing To enable the user to view quickly the geometry which he has created an interactive graphics feature has been supplied within the ASAP option This is activated via the graphical monitor option TSTSWP 1 of PHOENICS which offers a PHOTON button among the other interrupt options This allows the geometry to be inspected and velocity vectors but not yet contours to be drawn An example is shown below in secton 3 2 2 7 The ASAP file structure The ASAP has been attached to PHOENICS as an option All the files related to EARTH attachment are in the directory D EARTH D OPT D ASAP and the ASAP library ASALIBDA UDA is included in the directory D SATELL D OPT D ASAP The special GROUND GXASAP is called from GREX3 when NAMGRD is set to ASAP in the Q1 file 2 8 How to load ASAP library cases There are four cases in the ASAP library They are T Junction case 100 Ink Jet case 101 Soaking pit case 102 Drill bit case 103 To run a library case the user should follow the steps described below runsat type m to activate the top menu panel select library option from the menu panel select ASAP library select load option and enter case number select end to save the Q1 file and quit the SATELLITE runear During execution of EARTH the user can view the geometry and velocity vectors as described in Section 2 6 3 Some examples of the use of ASAP 3 1 The cylinder in cross flow at Reynolds Number 40 The GEOMDA file for this case is extremely simple because there is only one object to be introduced namely the cylinder It is as follows COORDINATE 1 0 0 5 0 0 PROPERTY 111 GROUP THE CYLINDER 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 CYLINDER 1 0 5 0 5 0 0 0 5 0 5 1 0 1 0 2 2 END OF GROUP EOF Computed results now follow Velocity vectors Pressure distribution Streamlines Comments on the circular cylinder results The computed results appear to be rather satisfactory the length of recirculation being around 2 0 whereas experimental data for this Reynolds Number may be somewhat larger No comprehensive study of the accuracy attainable has been made however 3 2 The tee junction A vertical pipe joins a horizontal pipe from below Both are represented as hollow cylinders within a rectangular steel block The Q1 file is supplied as Appendix 2 The GEOMDA file for this case is longer than that of the cylinder because there are three objects to introduce Note that one of them the box is of type 1 ie solid is inside while the others namely the cylinders are of type 2 ie solid lies outside Explanatory comments are included Declaration of variables used in this file box height horizontal half horiz box pipe diam pipe length thickness CONSTANT HEIGHT 1 5 HORPIPDI 1 0 HALFHOPILN 1 5 THICK 0 6 vertical pipe twice y coordinate diameter verpipdi of horiz pipe centre line CONSTANT VERPIPDI 0 8 TWVEPIDI 1 6 YHCL 1 0 Note that because ASAP language is unlike PIL not yet able to interpret arithmetic expressions both diameter and twice diameter must be assigned by the user x y z of origin of local coordinate system of following objects COORDINATE THICK 0 0 HALFHOPILN 111 is steel the colour of which is blue in the visual display PROPERTY 111 Group is a flag indicating the elements grouped to form a geometry Name and oordinates of bounding box corners are group name x1 y1 z1 x2 y2 z2 GROUP T JUNCTION THICK 0 0 HALFHOPILN 0 0 1 5 HALFHOPILN POLY SURFACE Two points to define a BOX The 1 means material set by PROPERTY is INside Coordinates of bounding box corners are the same as for GROUP BOX 1 THICK 0 0 HALFHOPILN 0 0 1 5 HALFHOPILN 102 for brick colour is red PROPERTY 102 Class of object is CYLINDER Type 2 means material is OUTside type x1 y1 z1 x2 y2 z2 diameter open ends vertical cylinder CYLINDER 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 YHCL 0 0 VERPIPDI 1 1 horizontal cylinder CYLINDER 2 0 0 YHCL TWVEPIDI 0 0 YHCL TWVEPIDI HORPIPDI 1 1 END END OF GROUP EOF Some computed results now follow A picture from the interactive viewer Velocity vectors A picture from PHOTON Pressure contours 3 3 The oil well drill bit This simulation represents a real life industrial problem The GEOMDA file for this case comprised 37 objects The file was 650 lines long The data were obtained manually from an AUTOCAD file because automatic data transfer has not yet been effected The grid was 54 54 25 The k epsilon turbulence model was employed No comparison with experimental data is available phoenics d polis d enc d pcx bit 1 phoenics d polis d enc d pcx bit 2 Velocity vectors Velocity vectors at a cross section 3 4 The Formula 1 racing car The GEOMDA file for this case comprised 44 objects The file was about 1000 lines long The grid size was 50 55 208 The k epsilon turbulence model was employed No comparisons with experimental data have been made phoenics d polis d enc d pcx car1 phoenics d polis d enc d pcx car2 phoenics d polis d enc d pcx car3 3 5 The leaking gas cooker in a room Finally an example in which there are sourcs of mass and momentum A gas cooker is supposed to be injecting unignited gas into a room Fortunately it is close to a ventilator The question is will the gas be withdrawn with sufficient rapidity The study is not complete from the engineering point of view but the pictures will show what ASAP can do Approximately half a man day was used in setting the problem up The room the cooker and the ventilator phoenics d polis d enc d pcx room A closer view The gas flow A closer view The gas concentrations near the top of the cooker 4 Future developments 4 1 With staggered grids ASAP has produced some excellent flow simulations many more than have been shown here CHAM thereore intends to develop it further Among the envisaged improvements are the ability to create GEOMDA files direct from CAD files the use of the SATELLITE file reading and interpreting capabilities to permit GEOMDA files to be written in an extended PIL format and so be enabled to use algebraic expressions logic and other labour saving utilities provision of further geometry and source primitives internal speed enhancing improvements for multi object grids providing acces from the interactiv graphics module to all PHOTON capailities extension to two phase flow Curved solid fluid boundaries are currently represented by ASAP in a step wise manner because all cells must be either fully blocked by solid or fully open to fluid For this reason accurate representation of the flow requires the use of rather fine grids It is possible to introduce into PHOENICS special solid fluid boundary conditions by extending the EGWF Earth Generated Wall Function feature Whether or not this will be done depends on the speed with which new X Cell algorithm of PHOENICS is developed Probably X Cell will advance with sufficient rapidity to rendered further adaptations of ASAP to staggered grids unnecessary 4 2 With X cell grids Reference 1 describes the X Cell feature of which all that need be stated here is that it currently employs a cartesian grid subdivided by diagonals Each rectangular cell therefore contains four triangular cells in two dimensions or six pyramidal cells in three dimensions This arrangement renders the acurate representation of curved solid fluid interfaces much easier because the fluid can lie on one side of a diagonal while the solid lies on the other In order to exploit X Cell ASAP will need to employ a somewhat different search procedure instead of asking which rectangular cell a solid particle lies in it must find out which CORNER of the cell it occupies There appears to be no difficulty of principle or practice in the way of this development 4 3 Other possibilities a Grid adaptation As described above ASAP placs solids and sources as well as it can in a pre defined grid and then immediately initiates the flow simulation calculation However it will often prove advisable to introduce a grid adaptation and refinement stage before the said calculation starts What is necessary is to compute the extent to which the solids as represented by blocked cells fail quite to conform to the objects defined by GEOMDA and then to shift grid coordinates while still retaining their cartesian nature or to introduce new cells in the best possible places so as to reduce the error b Development of an object library and the link with PHOENICS VR A modern tendency in applied computational fluid dynamics is to keep the mechanics of the simulation process hidden from the user The user will take responsibility for defining the situations to be simulated and for interpreting and assessing the results but he will require the simulation itself to proceed automatically economically and with good quality control ASAP is wholly compatible with this tendency but its dependence on the editing of the GEOMDA file at the present time imposes a requirement which not all users will meet Fortunately it is also compatible with the object oriented reality focussed style of the PHOENICS Virtual Reality Front End for the latter placs objects in space the former ASAP implants them in the grid What is therefore needed is an invisible link the GEOMDA file must automatically result from the VR user s specification 5 Conclusions ASAP has proved to be a robust and easy to use device for introducing complex geometrical and source data into PHOENICS Its great merit is that it can work which cartesian grids and that the user is spared the task of adapting even these to the input data Its disadvantages are that for a fixed number of cells it is likely to give less accurate solutions than those obtainable from body fitted coordinate grids Two kinds of improvement are foreseen namely an improvement in accuracy resulting from the adptation of ASAP to the X Cell grid and automatic generation of the GEOMDA file by use of the PHOENICS VR front end Appendix 1 The GEOMDA File and its syntax Geometrical information to be used by ASAP is stored in a formatted data file called GEOMDA The data in this file are organised in terms of both format and key words All key words or data items are separated by space s There is no distinction between real integer or character variables the type of a particular data item being determined by the format of the statement containing the data A typical GEOMDA file has the following format comments 1 CONSTANT name1 value1 name2 value2 COORDINATE x y z PROPERTY PRPS index GROUP group1 name x0 y0 z0 x1 y1 z1 BOX type x0b y0b z0b x1b y1b z1b CYLINDER type x0c y0c z0c x1c y1c z1c D END OF GROUP comments 2 GROUP group2 name x2 y2 z2 x3 y3 z3 BOX type x2b y2b z2b x3b y3b z3b POLY SURFACES CONE type x11 y11 z11 x12 y12 z12 x13 y13 z13 x21 y21 z21 x22 y22 z22 x23 y23 z23 SOLID type FIRST CHAIN xf1 yf1 zf1 xf2 yf2 zf2 Chai1n xcn1 ycn1 zcn1 xcn2 ycn2 zcn2 END END END OF GROUP EOF

    Original URL path: http://www.cham.co.uk/phoenics/d_polis/d_enc/asap.htm (2016-02-15)
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  • 0 25m OFFSET 0 00 0 25 0 00 CHANNELS 1 Zrotation End Site piston itself c 4 inches 0 09m OFFSET 0 0 0 09 0 000000 MOTION Frames 48 i e no of time steps which may be bigger or Frame Time 0 001 smaller than those of PHOENICS but are all equal in size the following table shows columns as follows 1st DOF movement crank rotation 2nd DOF movement conn rod rotation 3rd DOF movement big end rotation 0 0 0 the start 9 12 58755762 3 587557617 con rod 18 25 10030723 7 100307227 rotation 27 37 46274775 10 46274775 crank 36 49 59834873 13 59834873 rotation 45 61 42994019 16 42994019 54 72 8811896 18 8811896 63 83 8794316 20 8794316 72 94 35986233 22 35986233 81 104 2706727 23 27067267 90 113 5781785 23 57817848 99 122 2706727 23 27067267 108 130 3598623 22 35986233 117 137 8794316 20 8794316 126 144 8811896 18 8811896 135 151 4299402 16 42994019 144 157 5983487 13 59834873 153 163 4627478 10 46274775 162 169 1003072 7 100307227 171 174 5875576 3 587557617 180 180 0 end of expansion stroke 189 185 4124424 3 587557617 198 190

    Original URL path: http://www.cham.co.uk/phoenics/d_polis/d_lecs/mofor/enginmof.htm (2016-02-15)
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