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  • Electrical resistivity values
    volt per ampere per square meter that 1 ampere 1 coulomb per second and that 1 coulomb 1 joule per voltage difference Material Resistivity ohm m 1 Silver 1 59 x 10 8 Copper 1 7 x 10 8 Gold 2 4 x 10 8 Aluminum 2 8 x 10 8 Tungsten 5 6 x 10 8 Iron 10 x 10 8 Platinum 11 x 10 8 Lead 22 x

    Original URL path: http://www.cham.co.uk/phoenics/d_polis/d_enc/resist.htm (2016-02-15)
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  • FINITE-VOLUME EQUATIONS solved by PHOENICS
    rhoi P Ui e Ae if Ui e 0 but by ri E rhoi E Ui e Ae if Ui e 0 Likewise the flux of variable Fi across the east cell face is taken as the product of the mass flux and the value of Fi at the upwind node ie by Fi P ri P rhoi P Ui e Ae if Ui e 0 but by Fi E ri E rhoi E Ui e Ae if Ui e 0 In terms representing diffusion and heat conduction and viscous action the property gradients and the transport properties which they multiply are uniform over cell faces further the new time values in a time dependent calculation are supposed to prevail throughout the time interval In terms representing sources the nodal values are supposed to prevail over the whole of the cell volume and the new time values ie the late time ones are supposed to prevail over the whole of the time interval The diffusion fluxes The diffusion fluxes are taken to be the product of the cell to cell difference in the Fi values and the cell face area divided by the resistance to diffusion represented by the integral over the distance between the cell centres of distance increment exchamge coefficient Thus for the simplest case of brick shaped cells and single phase flow the diffusion flux of variable Fi from cell P to cell E is computed if the default harmonic mean option is chosen by the last argument of the SOLUTN command FE FP Ae Pe GP eE GE where Ae is the cell face area Pe and eE are the distances frpm the cell centres to the cell face and GE and GP are the values of the relevant exchange coefficient appropriate to cells P and

    Original URL path: http://www.cham.co.uk/phoenics/d_polis/d_enc/finite.htm (2016-02-15)
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  • of the numerical inputs required 1992 12 by the PHOENICS flow simulation code To run PHOENICS it is necessary to specify FOR EACH VARIABLE DTFALS the relaxation parameter RESREF the termination criterion based on residuals LITER the maximum number of iterations within the solver ENDIT the iteratio termination or over relaxation factor ISOLX ISOLY ISOLZ ISOLBK the frequencies of employment of the available block relaxation actions VARMIN VARMAX the lower and upper cut off values and MANY MORE Also there are parameters which govern the maximum number of cycles through loops encompassing all variables and slabs WHAT ARE THE BEST VALUES FOR A GIVEN CASE Int High Tech 6 The Expert System CFD Code Forum BASEL 1992 12 Sources of advice on numerical inputs 1 Text book theory This is almost non existent What exists pertains to very simple non typical cases 2 Code manuals These are more suggestive than instructive Code vendors condense their experience into guidance rules not precise prescriptions 3 User experience Only users who work intensively on a narrow problem range accumulate enough enough 4 Data bases Past experience of all users could in principle be put into a data base to be accessed at input time Who knows of one 5 Trial and error Int High Tech 7 The Expert System CFD Code Forum BASEL 1992 17 Two kinds of trial and error method 1 PRE SELECTION AND REPETITION the artillery method Many runs are conducted with different numerical input data systematically varied The data combinations which maximise accuracy and economy are then adopted for further production runs Drawbacks The preliminary search can cost much computer and man time The adopted data sets may still not be best for all runs Int High Tech 8 The Expert System CFD Code Forum BASEL 1992 12 Two kinds of trial and error method 2 IN FLIGHT ADJUSTMENT the automatic pilot The computer code is provided with an expert system device which seeks the optimum set of numerical controls WHILE THE COMPUTATION IS IN PROGRESS The search involves systematically varying the inputs noting their efects on convergence speed homing in on the optimal set Advantage The method exploits the fact that the best data sets for the START of a calculation are often not the best for the MIDDLE and END stages Int High Tech 9 The Expert System CFD Code Forum BASEL 1992 12 Examples of in flight adjustment Three examples of the use of the PHOENICS EXPERT system will be presented 1 Adjustment of the over relaxation factor in the solution of a steady state HEAT CONDUCTION problem 2 The operation of the same device for calculating the potential flow solution for flow around a MOVING TRUCK 3 The correction of bad first choices of false time steps for velocities in a DRIVEN CAVITY CALCULATION The calculations will be performed live on a notebook PC Int High Tech 10 The Expert System CFD Code Forum BASEL 1992 12 Discussion 1 The heat conduction example EXPERT raised

    Original URL path: http://www.cham.co.uk/phoenics/d_polis/d_lecs/expertlc.htm (2016-02-15)
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  • FACETDAT.HTM
    00 0 000000E 00 2 000000E 01 1 000000E 01 2 000000E 01 2 000000E 01 1 000000E 01 2 000000E 01 0 000000E 00 0 000000E 00 2 000000E 01 2 000000E 01 0 000000E 00 2 000000E 01 2 000000E 01 1 000000E 01 2 000000E 01 0 000000E 00 1 000000E 01 0 000000E 00 0 000000E 00 0 000000E 00 2 000000E 01 0 000000E 00 0 000000E 00 2 000000E 01 0 000000E 00 1 000000E 01 0 000000E 00 0 000000E 00 1 000000E 01 0 000000E 00 2 000000E 01 0 000000E 00 0 000000E 00 0 000000E 00 0 000000E 00 0 000000E 00 0 000000E 00 1 000000E 01 0 000000E 00 2 000000E 01 1 000000E 01 0 000000E 00 0 000000E 00 1 000000E 01 2 000000E 01 0 000000E 00 1 000000E 01 2 000000E 01 2 000000E 01 1 000000E 01 0 000000E 00 2 000000E 01 1 000000E 01 0 000000E 00 2 000000E 01 0 000000E 00 2 000000E 01 2 000000E 01 0 000000E 00 2 000000E 01 0 000000E 00 0 000000E 00 0 000000E 00 0 000000E 00 0 000000E 00 OBJECT 2 NFACETS 300 OBJNAM SPHERE1 IOBJTYP 7 OBJCLASS VOL OBJECT BOUNDING BOX 0 000000E 00 1 000000E 00 0 000000E 00 1 000000E 00 0 000000E 00 1 000000E 01 clip art rot 1 a b g 0 000000E 00 0 000000E 00 0 000000E 00 5 000000E 01 5 000000E 01 0 000000E 00 9 990100E 01 5 314000E 01 0 000000E 00 1 000000E 00 5 000000E 01 0 000000E 00 5 000000E 01 5 000000E 01 0 000000E 00 1 000000E 00 5 000000E 01 0 000000E 00 9 990100E 01 5 314000E 01 0 000000E 00

    Original URL path: http://www.cham.co.uk/phoenics/d_polis/d_enc/facetdat.htm (2016-02-15)
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  • FIELD.HTM
    values of the whole field Use of Field scaling will ensure that contours on different planes show consistent colours Field print outs see GROUPS 20 24 Field values plotting as CONTURs or PROFILes see PLOT Field variables The command VARIABLES provides a list of the available field variables and their names of which there are 50 by default although this number can be indefinitely enlarged by making modifications to the

    Original URL path: http://www.cham.co.uk/phoenics/d_polis/d_enc/field.htm (2016-02-15)
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  • PHOENICS - FIELDVIEW Interface
    compelling presentations Gain full understanding After calculations have been performed using PHOENICS FIELDVIEW allows easy interrogation of the simulation data to see the behaviour of fluid flows naturally and accurately It improves productivity Perform an ideal simulation PHOENICS produces datasets of varying sizes and FIELDVIEW can handle these seamlessly FIELDVIEW works with transient and steady state data with structured unstructured and hybrid grids Very large calculations can be performed by PHOENICS and then FIELDVIEW s client server architecture can accommodate the processing of those problems Compare results interactively Use static images or animations Plot critical values Quickly see important flow characteristics Use advanced feature extraction vortex cores surface flows shock surfaces Automate and optimize Engineering and research tasks are often repeated on multiple datasets PHOENICS accommodates these and with FIELDVIEW tasks and routines can be automated which allows users to work with your results rather than recreating simulations Compare datasets directly Produce standardized images and animations Suspend and continue work sessions no need to start over Prove your point Create meaningful presentations to ensure audiences understand the message Present complex data interactively Explore what if scenarios Present cases live within FIELDVIEW or with recorded animations Share your insights with colleagues

    Original URL path: http://www.cham.co.uk/phoenics/d_polis/d_enc/fieldv.htm (2016-02-15)
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  • FILEH.HTM
    attributes supplied as data in the program specific configuration files SATCON EARCON etc These attributes are the name of the file the logical unit LU number it uses the FORTRAN OPEN statement IOPEN required for it the FORTRAN CLOSE statement ICLOSE required for it and the record length LREC of the file The OPEN statement options supplied in OPENZZ are tabulated below IOPEN Arguments of OPEN statement for config file only old formatted shared read only recl lrec old formatted sequential recl lrec unknown formatted sequential print file recl lrec unknown formatted sequential recl lrec old formatted direct access shared read only recl lrec unknown un formatted direct access recl lrec old un formatted direct access recl lrec open read from vdu open write to vdu old formatted sequential shared read only recl lrec old formatted sequential recl lrec unknown formatted direct access recl lrec scratch un formatted direct access recl lrec old unformatted sequential recl lrec file not opened this may be useful for opening to the vdu on some systems scratch formatted direct access recl lrec new formatted sequential recl lrec The CLOSE statement options supplied in CLOSZZ are tabulated below ICLOSE Arguments of ICLOSE statements Keep Delete

    Original URL path: http://www.cham.co.uk/phoenics/d_polis/d_enc/fileh.htm (2016-02-15)
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  • flair
    is therefore required to operate FLAIR FLAIR Features Dimensionality FLAIR allows the simulation of systems which are two or three dimensional in space and either time dependent or steady Geometrical features FLAIR can employ three types of coordinate systems Cartesian polar and general curvilinear or body fitted In the case of Cartesian and polar coordinate systems the geometry is defined before and independently of the computational grid In body fitted coordinates BFC s the geometry is defined with the computational grid but in such a way as to allow salient features to be identified as separate regions of the grid which are later used for locating boundary conditions Boundary conditions For Cartesian and polar grids boundary conditions may be linked to geometrical features they are then independent of the computational grid For BFC grids boundary conditions are defined in terms of regions of the grid but these remain dependent on the rest of the geometry and the computational grid Library of materials Buildings and equipment can be built up from differing materials and these can be selected from a built in library It is based on the materials listed in the CIBSE Guide User defined materials FLAIR allows users to add materials to the existing library if this does not meet the requirements for a particular simulation Predicted quantities The simulation performed by FLAIR computes values of pressure temperature velocity turbulent quantities and marker variable e g smoke concentration within the domain of interest defined by the extent of the computational grid i e within and or around the enclosure being modelled Gravity FLAIR has a built in gravity force model this acts in the y direction in 3 dimensional coordinates and in 2 dimensional x y or y z coordinates or in the z direction in 2 dimensional x

    Original URL path: http://www.cham.co.uk/phoenics/d_polis/d_info/flair.htm (2016-02-15)
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