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  • INAME TEMP DO 50002 IX 1 NX IADD NY IX 1 DO 50002 IY 1 NY I IY IADD L0TEMP LFTEMP I 50002 DZ DZL 1 0 02 F L0TEMP 1 IY NFM 1 CALL FN1 LXYDZ DZ ENDIF ENDIF ENDIF Click here to return to Contents 3 4 An example of analytical BFC grid generation Library case Z607 Library case Z608 Library case Z609 Library case Z501 Library case Z502 Library case Z503 Library case Z504 Library case Z505 Library case Z506 Library case Z507 Library case Z508 Library case Z509 Library case Z510 Library case Z511 Library case Z512 Library case Z513 Library case Z514 PLANT can be used as a formula based BFC grid generator The complex BFC grids are created in response of typing in Q1 parameterised analytical expressions as exemplified below What the user puts into Q1 REAL LENGTH TWOPI LITTLER PARAM LENGTH 10 0 LITTLER 1 0 TWOPI 2 0 3 14157 PARAM 1 0 MXYZ01 XC ABS PARAM COS LENGTH FLOAT K 1 FLOAT NZ LITTLER FLOAT J 1 FLOAT NY COS TWOPI FLOAT I 1 FLOAT NX MXYZ01 YC ABS PARAM COS LENGTH FLOAT K 1 FLOAT NZ LITTLER FLOAT J 1 FLOAT NY SIN TWOPI FLOAT I 1 FLOAT NX MXYZ01 ZC LENGTH FLOAT K 1 FLOAT NZ IF ISTEP EQ 1 AND ISWEEP EQ 1 The above three statements followed by IF command provide the calculation of cartesian coordinates for cell corners of the grid fitted the corrugated in accord with abs cosZ function circular pipe of 1m radius and 10m length The grid is uniform in both direction The generation is made at the first sweep of the first time step The calculation results in the grid shown on the next picture The formula parameters in above setttings are the pipe length LENGTH its radius LITTLER and corrugation factor PARAM If some of them are set to be say a function of time the moving BFC grid can be esily generated For example the replacement of PARAM by PARAM TIM would result in the number of BFC grid generated for each time moment The next three pictures illustrate the grids for suuccesive time moments as follows Time 0 0 sec Time 0 25 sec Time 0 75 sec What PLANT puts into GROUND c Special calls name MXYZ01 IF BFC THEN IF ISTEP EQ 1 AND ISWEEP EQ 1 THEN DO 19201 K 1 NZ 1 DO 19201 I 1 NX 1 DO 19201 J 1 NY 1 XC ABS 7 5000E 01 COS 10 FLOAT K 1 FLOAT NZ 1 FLOAT 1 J 1 FLOAT NY COS 6 2831E 00 FLOAT I 1 FLOAT NX YC ABS 7 5000E 01 COS 10 FLOAT K 1 FLOAT NZ 1 FLOAT 1 J 1 FLOAT NY SIN 6 2831E 00 FLOAT I 1 FLOAT NX ZC 10 FLOAT K 1 FLOAT NZ CALL SECRNS XCORNR YCORNR ZCORNR I J K XC YC ZC 19201 CONTINUE CALL BGEOM 1 CALL BGEOM 2 CALL DUMPS CSG1 1 1 CSG2 1 1 0 1 0 0 ENDIF ENDIF Click here to return to Contents 3 5 An example of convection flux alteration Library case Z614 Library case Z621 This calculation is of scalar source dispersion in 45 degree uniform flow PLANt is used to alter the convection fluxes so that the plume can propagate in the direction opposite to the flow The result vector field and the dispersion plume are as shown The case presented exploits the ability of PLANT for easy indicial expression operations to create multi domain computational space What the user puts into Q1 Although the problem in question is 2D NX NY 20 20 in nature the provision is made below for cartesian box to have 2 slabs GROUP 3 X direction grid specification GRDPWR x 20 20 1 0 GROUP 4 Y direction grid specification GRDPWR Y 20 20 1 0 GROUP 5 Z direction grid specification GRDPWR Z 2 2 1 0 The convection diffusion transport of scalar in prescribed velocity field will be considered here so that GROUP 7 Variables stored solved named SOLVE H1 STORE U1 V1 W1 HPOR GROUP 8 Terms in differential equations devices TERMS H1 N Y Y Y Y Y The nullification by two commands below of high face porosities provides the independency of the slab sub domains GROUP 11 Initialization of variable or porosity fields INIADD F FIINIT HPOR 0 0 The following set of initialisations make the 45 degree flow of 5 m s from south east edge of the domain It will be maintained as 1st and 2nd slab velocity fields FIINIT V1 5 0 FIINIT U1 5 0 Although the velocity field at the second slab is the same as for first one the add extra velocity option is activated as PLANT settings below tell NAMSAT MOSG U1AD GRND SCUF01 VELAD 2 U1 1 REGION NX 1 IZ EQ 2 V1AD GRND SCVF01 VELAD 2 V1 1 REGION NY 1 IF IZ EQ 2 The extra velocities added to the flow velocity components alters the convection fluxes to become opposite to ones at first slab Please note the differences in the REGION qualifier They are attributed to the staggered nature of velocity nodes The alternative use of either switch IZ EQ 2 or IF command limits the Z direction extent of velocity alterations The expected distribution of convected property H1 fixed at the middle of the second slab by PATCH FIXSOR CELL nx 2 nx 2 NY 2 NY 2 2 2 1 1 COVAL FIXSOR H1 FIXVAL 1 0 results in the plume towards the north west corner of the domain What PLANT puts into GROUND In the GROUND file PLANT inserts the following FORTRAN coding c Special calls name SCUF01 IF ISTEP GE 1 AND ISTEP LE LSTEP THEN IF IZ EQ 2 THEN IF IZ GE 1 AND IZ LE NZ THEN LFVELA L0F VELAD LFU1 L0F U1 DO 81001 IX 1 NX 1 IADD NY IX 1 DO 81001 IY 1 NY I IY IADD L0VELA LFVELA I L0U1 LFU1 I 81001 F L0VELA 2 F L0U1 NFM 1 IZ ENDIF ENDIF ENDIF c Special calls name SCVF01 IF ISTEP GE 1 AND ISTEP LE LSTEP THEN IF IZ EQ 2 THEN IF IZ GE 1 AND IZ LE NZ THEN LFVELA L0F VELAD LFV1 L0F V1 DO 83001 IX 1 NX IADD NY IX 1 DO 83001 IY 1 NY 1 I IY IADD L0VELA LFVELA I L0V1 LFV1 I 83001 F L0VELA 2 F L0V1 NFM 1 IZ ENDIF ENDIF ENDIF Click here to return to Contents 3 6 An example of a non linear property correlation Library case Z612 The case presented is entitled Lid driven flow with property variations Briefly this calculation is of flow in a cavity the top wall of which moves with constant velocity The top wall is at one temperature the moving wall is at a different temperature and the other walls are adiabatic The calculation is made for Reynolds number Re 100 for Prandtl number Pr 1 and for an exponent type viscosity formula of the type EMU EMU0 EXP beta T T0 The geometry and vector and temperature contour results are as shown What the user puts into Q1 GROUP 9 Properties of the medium or media PRNDTL TEMP 0 7 ENUL GRND REAL ENULR EXPO TEMPR ENULR 1 E 3 EXPO 1 6 TEMPR 0 0 PRPT01 VISL ENULR EXP EXPO TEMP TEMPR The result viscosity field is highly non uniform What PLANT puts into GROUND In the GROUND file PLANT inserts the following FORTRAN coding c Property name PRPT01 IF ISTEP GE 1 AND ISTEP LE LSTEP THEN IF IZ GE 1 AND IZ LE NZ THEN LFTEMP L0F INAME TEMP DO 96001 IX IXF IXL IADD NY IX 1 DO 96001 IY IYF IYL I IY IADD L0TEMP LFTEMP I L0VISL LFVISL I 96001 F L0VISL 1 0000E 03 EXP 1 6000E 00 F L0TEMP 0 ENDIF ENDIF Click here to return to Contents 3 7 An example of interphase transport Library case Z606 TEXT VEHICULAR EXHAUST DISPERSION IN RAINFALL This case simulates interactions between air and rainfall in the street between a tall and a low rise neighbouring building The pollution is caused by inter phase transport from gaseous to liquid phase The contaminant concentration in liquid phase is depicted on the picture PLANT instructions provided in Group 10 make the special GROUND codings What the user puts into Q1 GROUP 10 Inter phase transfer processes and properties Set a constant inter phase friction coefficient CFIPS gravac rho2 rho1 fallvl Instruct PLANT to code the inter phase transfer coefficients and PHI differences between the phases CINT H1 GRND PRPT01 COI1 H1 10 MASS2 Equation 1 CINT H2 1 e10 PHINT H1 GRND PRPT02 FII1 H1 H2 Equation 2 PHINT H2 GRND PRPT03 FII2 H2 H1 Equation 3 What PLANT puts into GROUND For Equation 2 the following Ground coding was created by PLANT c Property name PRPT02 IF INDVAR EQ INAME H1 THEN LFFII1 L0F FII1 LFH2 L0F H2 DO 98002 IX IXF IXL IADD NY IX 1 DO 98002 IY IYF IYL I IY IADD L0H2 LFH2 I L0FII1 LFFII1 I 98002 F L0FII1 F L0H2 ENDIF For Equation 3 the following Ground coding was created by PLANT c Property name PRPT03 IF INDVAR EQ INAME H2 THEN LFFII2 L0F FII2 LFH1 L0F H1 DO 99003 IX IXF IXL IADD NY IX 1 DO 99003 IY IYF IYL I IY IADD L0H1 LFH1 I L0FII2 LFFII2 I 99003 F L0FII2 F L0H1 ENDIF For Equation 1 the following Ground coding was created by PLANT c Property name PRPT01 IF INDVAR EQ INAME H1 THEN LFCOI1 L0F COI1 LFMAS2 L0F MASS2 DO 10301 IX IXF IXL IADD NY IX 1 DO 10301 IY IYF IYL I IY IADD L0MAS2 LFMAS2 I L0COI1 LFCOI1 I 10301 F L0COI1 10 F L0MAS2 ENDIF The reader is asked to compare these latter three panels with what was placed in the Q1 file Click here to return to Contents 3 8 An example of devices for setting initial and porosity fields Library case Z605 The settings which appear below illustrate some of the existing initialisation techniques available in PLANT They cover Flow field initialistions by parametric analytics Manipulating with initial fields MARKing sub domains to create arbitrary initial fields Geometry initialisations What the user puts into Q1 a For flow field initialistions by parametric analytics PATCH INI1 INIVAL 1 NX 1 NY 1 1 1 1 INIT01 VAL XU2D 10 COVAL INI1 U1 zero GRND INIT02 VAL YV2D 10 COVAL INI1 V1 zero GRND By above settings the first slab of 3D domain is initialized by stagnation point flow with the cartesian components as follows U1 X 10 and V1 10 Y Resulting initial flow field is as shown The settings below initialize the flow field in 2nd slab by solid body rotation components as follows PATCH INI2 INIVAL 1 NX 1 NY 2 2 1 1 INIT03 VAL YG2D 10 COVAL INI2 U1 zero GRND INIT04 VAL XG2D 10 COVAL INI2 V1 zero GRND Resulting initialization is as shown b For manipulating with initial fields PATCH INI3 INIVAL 1 NX 1 NY 3 3 1 1 INIT05 VAL U1 1 U1 1 COVAL INI3 U1 zero GRND INIT06 VAL V1 2 V1 2 COVAL INI3 V1 zero GRND By above settings the 3rd slab of 3D domain is initialized by superposition of velocities at 2nd and 1st slabs The composite initialization is as shown c For MARKing sub domains to create arbitrary initial fields FIINIT MARK 1 0 PATCH INIT70 INIVAL 1 NX 2 1 NY 4 4 1 1 INIT70 VAL XYELLP 2 10 10 8 8 0 0 INIT INIT70 MARK 0 GRND In above statement XYELLP function is used to make the half circle of 16 m diameter as follows i In the west half of 4th slab ii place the ellipse marked by 2 1st argument with the centre at XC 10 m 2nd argument and YC 10 m 3rd argument and both half axes equal to 8 m 4th and 5th arguments iii The 6th and 7th function arguments are insignificant for the circle shape and CARTES T SC0301 U1 U1 2 REGION 2 ISWEEP EQ 1 SC0302 V1 V1 2 REGION 2 ISWEEP EQ 1 The above two statements followed by the REGION qualifiers with parameters and switches set the velocity components of 4th slab region marked by MARK 2 to be equal of those of 2nd slab It is done at the start of IZ 2 slab for the first sweep only By this way arbitrary complex flow field can be initialized as picture shows The same technique provides the possibility to distribute the PRPS values to describe the complex geometry on Cartesian polar and BFC grids by blocking off The first picture shows how the resulting shape may look like on Cartesian grid The next picture depicts the blocking off polar grid Finally the result of blocking off the BFC grid is shown PLANT is equipped with a number of geometrical functions which can be used in Q1 settings to make all above actions easy and straightforward Click here to return to Contents 3 9 An example of non linear boundary conditions and source laws Library case Z6106 TEXT 3D STEADY HEAT CONDUCTION IN A CUBE RADIATION AND CONVECTION FROM A HOT BLOCK This example exemplifies the use of PLANT for external heat transfer laws This feature allows inclusion of external heat loss by way of radiation using the distribution of radiosity i e sigma Text 4 Ts 4 and forced convection a Text Ts The geometry and temperature distribution are shown on the picture What the user puts into Q1 GROUP 13 Boundary conditions and special sources REAL RADCO TMPX RADCO 1 e 6 TMPX 100 RG 1 RADCO RG 2 TMPX PATCH RAD HIGH 1 NX 1 NY NZ NZ 1 1 SORC01 CO RG 1 RG 2 2 H1 2 RG 2 H1 SORC01 VAL RG 2 COVAL RAD h1 GRND GRND What PLANT puts into GROUND c Source name SORC01 IF INDVAR EQ INAME H1 AND NPATCH EQ RAD THEN LFCO L0F CO LFH1 L0F H1 DO 13701 IX IXF IXL IADD NY IX 1 DO 13701 IY IYF IYL I IY IADD L0H1 LFH1 I 13701 F LFCO I RG 1 RG 2 2 F L0H1 2 RG 2 F L0H1 ENDIF IF INDVAR EQ INAME H1 AND NPATCH EQ RAD THEN LFVAL L0F VAL DO 13801 IX IXF IXL IADD NY IX 1 DO 13801 IY IYF IYL I IY IADD 13801 F LFVAL I RG 2 ENDIF Click here to return to Contents 3 10 An example of setting residual reference values Click to return here after viewing pictures The example is concerned with the calculation of reference residuals for dependent variable G as an arithmetic mean of its net generation rate over the slab What the user puts into Q1 SC0655 RES SUM VOL GENG 2 RHO1 EPKE G NY NZ SC0656 RESREF G RES By above two statements the reference residuals for G is calculated at the end of each z slab What PLANT puts into GROUND COMMON SPLVRB RES c Special calls name SC0655 IF ISTEP GE 1 AND ISTEP LE LSTEP THEN IF IZ GE 1 AND IZ LE NZ THEN IF IZ EQ 1 RES 0 LFVOL L0F VOL LFGENG L0F INAME GENG LFEPKE L0F INAME EPKE LFG L0F INAME G DO 19655 IX 1 NX IADD NY IX 1 DO 19655 IY 1 NY I IY IADD L0VOL LFVOL I L0GENG LFGENG I L0EPKE LFEPKE I L0G LFG I 19655 RES RES F L0VOL F L0GENG 2 1 F L0EPKE F L0G 1 NY NZ ENDIF ENDIF c Special calls name SC0656 IF ISTEP GE 1 AND ISTEP LE LSTEP THEN IF IZ GE 1 AND IZ LE NZ THEN DO 19656 IX 1 NX IADD NY IX 1 DO 19656 IY 1 NY I IY IADD 19656 RESREF INAME G RES ENDIF ENDIF c SECTION 8 Finish of time step LU 1 OPEN UNIT LU FILE GLOBCALC STATUS UNKNOWN WRITE LU Global calculations WRITE LU RES RES CLOSE LU Click here to return to Contents 3 11 An example of setting under relaxation devices Library case Z613 Click to return here after viewing pictures Two types of self steering false time under relaxations for the velocities are introduced by way of PLANT namely global and local self steering To see the power of relaxation the solution process is divided into 3 stages No relaxation for ISWEEP less and equal 100 Global relaxation for ISWEEP larger than 100 and less or equal 200 and Local self steering relaxation for ISWEEP larger than 200 The picture shows the convergence process which is clearly divided into three stages described above SC0201 RG 2 AMIN1 XULAST FLOAT NX YVLAST FLOAT NY ZWLAST FLOAT NZ AMAX1 U1 FLO1 2 REGION 1 1 2 3 2 2 IF ISWEEP GT 100 AND ISWEEP LE 200 SC0202 DTFALS U1 RG 2 REGION 1 1 1 1 1 1 IF ISWEEP GT 100 AND ISWEEP LE 200 In the above global under relaxation is introduced by PLANTed codings for DTFALS U1 at the start of each sweep It is assumed to be equal to the smallest of the cell sizes divided by the largest of inlet mass flux velocity and local velocity magnitude normal to the inlet plane It is applied over the whole domain for the velocity in question IF isweep is greater than 100 but less or equal than 200 Here and for next two statemnts command REGION with unity arguments is used to economize the operations needed for equivalences SC0203 DTFALS V1 RG 2 REGION 1 1 1 1 1 1 IF ISWEEP GT 100 AND ISWEEP LE 200 The above settings do for DTFALS

    Original URL path: http://www.cham.co.uk/phoenics/d_polis/d_lecs/plant/plan3.htm (2016-02-15)
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  • of built in corrections that allow use of the model in both high and low Reynolds number regions of the flow At high turbulence Reynolds numbers the RNG KE EP model of YO is of the same general form as the standard KE EP model except that the model constants are calculated explicitly from the RNG analysis and assume somewhat different values Quite recently Smith and Reynolds 1992 identified several problems with YO s original derivation of the EP equation This led Yakhot and Smith 1992 to reformulate the derivation of this equation which resulted in a re evaluation of the constant controlling the production of EP and the discovery of an additional production term in the EP equation which becomes significant in rapidly distorted flows and flows removed from equilibrium Although RNG methods were unable to close the additional production term Yakhot et al 1992 developed a model for the closure of this term The resulting high Reynolds number form of the RNG KE EP model proved successful for the calculation of a number of separated flows and it is this version of the model that has been provided in PHOENICS However the user is advised that the model results in substantial deterioration in the prediction of plane and round free jets in stagnant surroundings 2 Description of the model The RNG KE EP model differs from the standard high Reynolds form of the KE EP model in that a the following model constants take different values PRT KE 0 7194 PRT EP 0 7194 C1E 1 42 C2E 1 68 CMUCD 0 0845 and b the dissipation rate transport equation includes an additional source term per unit volume S EP RHO1 ALF EP 2 KE 2 1 where ALF CMUCD ETA 3 1 ETA ETA0 1 BETA ETA 3 2 2 ETA0 4 38 and BETA 0 012 The dimensionless parameter ETA is defined by ETA S KE EP 2 3 where S 2 2 Sij Sij 2 4 and Sij 0 5 DUi DXj DUj DXi 2 5 In PHOENICS terms it may be noted that S is simply the square root of the generation function LGEN1 The additional source term 2 1 becomes significant for flows with large strain rates i e when ETA ETA0 The parameter ETA is a measure of the ratio of the turbulent to mean time scale In the limit of weak strain where S and ETA tends to zero the additional source term tends to zero and the original form of the k e model is recovered In the limit of strong strain where S and ETA tend to infinity the additional source term becomes S EP RHO1 CMUCD ETA EP 2 BETA ETA0 KE ETA0 is the fixed point for homogeneously strained turbulent flows and BETA is a constant evaluated to yield a von Karman constant of about 0 41 see Yakhot et al 1992 The low Re corrections to the RNG model have not been provided as a correct

    Original URL path: http://www.cham.co.uk/phoenics/d_polis/d_enc/turmod/enc_t343.htm (2016-02-15)
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  • SATEL.HTM
    COPYQ1 file are transferred to the Q1 file if the user answers Y when asked A suitably processed version of the data is written to the file called EARDAT for transmission to EARTH The following brief notes about each item supplement what has been written above a The default settings The default settings of the PHOENICS variables are set by a subroutine which is not accessible to the user they are therefore always the same What the values are can be observed in part by the use of the SEE command when an empty Q1 is interpreted However values pertaining to particular dependent variables are disclosed by SEE only if the instruction has already been given to solve for those variables It is necessary at least to give positive SOLVE instructions if the default values are to be SEEn b The Q1 file Examples of Q1 files are provided in the PHOENICS Input Library See also PHENC Q1 SATELLITE always begins by reading the first line of the Q1 file in order to learn whether the conversational mode is to be used and how many distinct runs are in question RUN 1 1 indicates that only one run is to be performed whereas RUN 10 15 for example would dictate the performance of runs 10 to 15 inclusive The built in interpreter of the SATELLITE then reads through all subsequent lines until it encounters the STOP instruction c SATLIT Having read Q1 the SATELLITE program executes the FORTRAN subroutine SATLIT into which the user is allowed if he wishes to insert his own FORTRAN coding sequences As PIL has become more powerful so the need for such insertions has become less so that nowadays SATLIT is rarely modified See PHENC SATLIT d Interactive use When the PHOENICS SATELLITE is activated

    Original URL path: http://www.cham.co.uk/phoenics/d_polis/d_enc/satel.htm (2016-02-15)
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  • Satellite Interactive Text-Mode Help Entries
    DBGRND DBINDX DBL DBMAIN DBMDOT DBONLY DBOUT DBPRBL DBRHO DBSHFT DBSODA DBSOL1 DBSOL2 DBSOL3 DBT DCOM DEBUG DEFAULT DEFINE DEL DELAY DELETE DEN1 DEN2 DENPCO DIAG DIFCUT DIMENS DISSIP DISTANCE FROM WALL DISTIL DMPSTK DO DOCUMENTATION DOMAIN DONACC DRH1DP DRH2DP DSTTOL DTFALS DUDX DUDY DUDZ DVDX DVDY DVDZ DVO1DT DVO2DT DWDX DWDY DWDZ DZW1 DZWNZ Links beginning with E EAST ECHO EGWF EL1 EL2 ELEMENT ELSE ELSOA ENU EPOR EQDVDP EQUVEL EWALL EX Links beginning with F FALSDT FDFSOL FGEM FIINIT FIXCOR FIXDOM FIXFLU FIXP FIXVAL FLAG FREE FREE SUFACE FLOWS FSWEEP Links beginning with G GALA GCLEAR GDOM GDRAW GENK GET GGET GGRID GLINE GLIST GOTO GPATCH GPHERR GPROJ GRAVITATIOAL BODY FORCES GRDCHK GRDPWR GREAT GRND GROUP GSET GTEXT GTPARG GVIEW Links beginning with H H1 H2 HEATBL H O L HEL HGSOA HGSOB HIGH HOL HPOR HUNIT HWALL Links beginning with I IORCVF IORCVL IBUOYA B C ICHR ICNGRA B C ICOLOA IDBCMN IDBFO IDBGRD IDISPA B C D IENUTA IF IG IGES INTERFACE IGR IHOLA ILATGA IMB1 IMB2 IMON INCHCK INFO INIADD INIFLD INIPLN INIPOL INIT INIVAL INLET INTEGER INTERPOLATION INT IOPTN IPARAB IPLTF IPLTL IPORIA IPORIB IPRN IPROF IPRPSA IPRPSB IREG IROTAA IRSMHM IRUN ISG1 ISKINA ISKINB ISLN ISOLBK ISOLX ISOLY ISOLZ ISTDB1 ISTDB2 ISTEP ISTPRF ISTPRL ISWC1 ISWDB1 ISWDB1 ISWEEP ISWPRF ISWPRL ISWR1 ISWR2 ITABL Iteration frequency for user defined blocks ITHCL ITHDB1 ITHDB2 ITHYD ITIMA B C IURINI IURPRN IURVAL IVARBK IX IXF IXL IXMON IXPRF IXPRL IY IYF IYL IYMON IYPRF IYPRL IZ IZDB1 2 IZMON IZPRF IZPRL IZSTEP IZW1 Links beginning with J JMON JMPBCK Links beginning with K KELIN KMON KTFR KXFR KYFR KZFR Links beginning with L LABEL LASLPA PB LCOALA LCOLOA OB LEN1 2 LG LIBLIST LIBRARY LIBREF LIJ LIK LINRLX LINVLX LINVLY LINVLZ LITC LITER LITFLX LITHYD LITXC LITYC LITZC LJK LOAD LOCATE LOGICAL LOOP LOW LSG1 LSTEP LSWEEP LWALL Links beginning with M MAGIC MAIN MAIN F MENSAV MESG MINPUT MOVBFC MSWP Links beginning with N NAME NAMFI NAMGRD NAMPAT NAMSAT NAMXYZ NCG1 NCOLCO NCOLPF NCRT NDBCMN NDBF0 NDIREC NDST NEWENL NEWENT NEWRH1 2 NEWS NFMAX NHDBSP NIG1 NISWDP NITZDP NLG1 NNORSL NOADAP NOCOMM NOCOPY NODAL NODEF NOGRD NONORT NORTH NOWIPE NPHI NPLT NPNAM1 NPOR NPRINT NPRMNT NPRMON NREGT NREGX NREGY NREGZ NRG1 NROWCO NSAVE NTPRIN NTZPRF NULLPR NUMCLS NUMCOL NWALL NX NXPRIN NY NYPRIN NZ NZPRIN NZSTEP Links beginning with O ONEPHS ONLYMS OPPVAL ORELSE ORSIZ OUTFLO OUTLET OUTPUT Links beginning with P P1 P2 PARAB PARABOLIC FLOWS PATCH PCOR PHASEM PHNH1A PHOENICS COMMANDER PHS2P A B C PICKUP PLINE PLOT POINT POLIS POLRA B POLYGON PORIA POROSIties POROSITY POSITION POTCMP Potential flow POTVEL POWER X Y PRANDTL PREFIX PREFIX FILE PREFIX FILE Preliminary print out PRESS0 Pressure boundary type PRINT0 PRINT OUT from EARTH PRINTING PRIVATE PRLC1A PRLH1A PRNDTL PRNTIM PROFA B C D PROFIL PROPERTIES PROPS PRPS PRT PRTSIZ PTEXT PTIME PUBLIC VERSION Links beginning with Q Q1MESG Q1QUIT QCOM QUIK Links beginning with R R1 2 RADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER RADIA RADIAT RADIATION RADIATION

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  • ENC_S.HTM
    the working directory by the satellite which contains messages including warnings or notices of failure recording events which transpired during execution The messages are also written to the screen but often they disappear again too swiftly to be read Therefore

    Original URL path: http://www.cham.co.uk/phoenics/d_polis/d_enc/satlog.htm (2016-02-15)
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  • SLIDE.HTM
    high boundary SLIDING GRID feature See Section 3 7 2 of PHENC entry Multi Block Grids and Fine Grid Embedding for the CCM implementation CCM multi block grids are restricted to natural links only but support one to many links and IPSA See Section 4 of PHENC entry GENERAL COLOCATED VELOCITY METHOD GCV for the GCV implementation GCV multi block grids support unstructured links between blocks and the GCV solver is very tolerant of skewed grids The links are always one to one and IPSA is not supported An alternatives to the BFC sliding grid may be the polar grid ROTOR object which allows parts of a cylindrical polar grid to rotate about the Z axis relative to the rest of the grid SLIDL PIL logical default F group 6 SLIDL when set T signals MAGIC L to slide the low edge boundary coordinates to equal their nearest internal neighbour This option should be used only when the low boundary is a surface of constant ZC When it is the effect is equivalent to XC I J 1 XC I J 2 YC I J 1 YC I J 2 where I and J are indices that run over the currently active DOMAIN SLIDH may be used only in conjunction with FIXDOM to slide the points on a specified sub domain of the low boundary SLIDN PIL logical default F group 6 SLIDN when set T signals MAGIC L to slide the north edge boundary coordinates to equal their nearest internal neighbour This option should be used only when the north boundary is a surface of constant YC When it is the effect is equivalent to XC I NY 1 K XC I NY K ZC I NY 1 K ZC I NY K where I and K are indices

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  • Setting the 'sliding velocity' of object surfaces
    the following picture By means of the VR Editor it is possible to introduce the same effect at the surface of a solid object by means which can be learned by clicking here The sliding velocity can be set for blockages as well as for plates By setting the surface velocity a range of cases involving steady movement can be treated as steady state In Cartesian co ordinates there is

    Original URL path: http://www.cham.co.uk/phoenics/d_polis/d_enc/slidevel.htm (2016-02-15)
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  • SOLVING.HTM
    solved at the same time Many cycles of adjustment can be performed for one slab before PHOENICS transfers its attention to the next slab The value if LITHYD sets the maximum number A sweep is a set of slabwise operations conducted in sequence from the lowest z slab to the highest z slab If slabwise solutions of a variable is in operation because the equations for values at one slab ordinarily make reference to values at the next higher z slab later adjustments made at the higher slab will upset to some extent the balances which have just been struck at the lower one For this reason many sweeps must be ordinarily be made in succession and the process should be continued ideally until all equations are in such perfect balance that further adjustments are unnecessary Whole field solution Whole field solution is a procedure which can be employed by PHOENICS for all variables except velocities It reduces the number of sweeps which must be made in order to eliminate the imbalances in the equations but it uses more computer storage Whole field solution is most effective for phenomena such as pure heat conduction or irrotational ie potential fluid flow for then a single sweep may suffice to give the solution Solving parabolic problems A parabolic problem is one in which although z direction gradients in solved for variables do exist the higher slab values do not appear in the lower slab equations because the coefficient aH is negligible for all points This situation often arises when there is a flow of fluid in the positive z direction and the Reynolds number is high as occurs in a duct or a jet or a boundary layer for then the influence of downstream conditions on upstream ones is very small If

    Original URL path: http://www.cham.co.uk/phoenics/d_polis/d_enc/solving.htm (2016-02-15)
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