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  • Buying A Property In France Archives - Cheesman Accountants
    Property In France Five questions to ask your accountant before buying a property in France By Carol Cheesman on 29th October 2013 in Tax Only a short train journey or ferry ride away France is a great place to visit But for those who want to make France a permanent home or buy a property to let there are a number of tax issues to consider In an article for

    Original URL path: http://www.cheesman.co.uk/tag/buying-a-property-in-france/ (2016-04-25)
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  • Property Investment Archives - Cheesman Accountants
    Content Tag Archives Property Investment Tax and investing in France By Carol Cheesman on 21st October 2013 in Tax Whether you are buying a property in France for a permanent move or as an investment you need to consider the tax implications before you sign on the dotted line In Tax and investing in France an article written for propertysales com Holly Clift Matthews suggests there are three questions you

    Original URL path: http://www.cheesman.co.uk/tag/property-investment/ (2016-04-25)
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  • Capital Gains Archives - Cheesman Accountants
    Tag Archives Capital Gains Seven ways to reduce your Capital Gains Tax bill By Carol Cheesman on 16th October 2013 in Tax Making a capital gain is usually good news but it can also come with a hefty tax bill So whether you are selling all or part of your business or some other assets for example property or shares it s important to plan for capital gains in order

    Original URL path: http://www.cheesman.co.uk/tag/capital-gains/ (2016-04-25)
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  • Tax Liability Archives - Cheesman Accountants
    Tag Archives Tax Liability Seven ways to reduce your Capital Gains Tax bill By Carol Cheesman on 16th October 2013 in Tax Making a capital gain is usually good news but it can also come with a hefty tax bill So whether you are selling all or part of your business or some other assets for example property or shares it s important to plan for capital gains in order

    Original URL path: http://www.cheesman.co.uk/tag/tax-liability/ (2016-04-25)
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  • Inheritance tax - how to minimise your liability
    is a very lucrative tax for the government Its purpose is to put money back into society so everybody can benefit however many people say that tax was paid at the time of purchase on possessions and income tax paid at the time on earnings so it is unfair to pay tax twice One thing is for certain more and more people are being hit by it especially with the rise of house prices It is therefore essential to prepare and take steps to avoid a big tax bill In this article for bytestart co uk Inheritance tax how to minimise your liability Carol Cheesman looks at things you can do to escape this oft resented tax and understand more about where you might be caught out if you re not careful It covers the basics and then looks at some options worth considering amongst these are Gifting and Life Insurance IHT rules can become complex and this article provides a very high level summary of the main rules We recommend you consult an accountant if you have any questions Contact us for further details Phone 020 7354 3914 Email The content of this document is intended for general guidance only and where relevant represents our understanding of current law and HM Revenue and Customs practice Action should not be taken without seeking professional advice No responsibility for loss by any person acting or refraining from action as a result of the material in this document can be accepted and we cannot assume legal liability for any errors or omissions this document may contain Cheesmans October 2013 All rights reserved About Carol Cheesman View all posts by Carol Cheesman Subscribe Subscribe to our e mail newsletter to receive updates Related Posts Changes to Capital Gains Tax affecting residential property owners

    Original URL path: http://www.cheesman.co.uk/inheritance-tax-minimise-liability/ (2016-04-25)
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  • UK resident or non-resident? Testing for Residency.
    fewer than 10 days in the current tax year defined as a leaver or You left the UK to carry out full time work abroad so long as you are present in the UK for fewer than 90 days in the tax year and less than 20 days are spent working in the UK in the tax year PART TWO RESIDENT You are resident in a tax year if you were either Present for 183 days or more in the tax year or Have only one home or more which are in the UK or Work full time in the UK If a condition in both part one and two are met then part one will prevail and you will be classed as non resident for tax purposes If part one or two do not determine residency then part three will be used as a deciding factor It takes into account connections in the UK and compares them with the number of days spent in the UK PART THREE CONNECTIONS The various connection factors are as follows Family Spouse civil partner or common law equivalent or minor children are in the UK Accommodation Property that is accessible as a place of residence and is used by you or your family during the tax year Work Substantive work defined as 40 days or more in the tax year where at least three hours a day are worked UK presence in a previous year If you spent 90 days or more in either of the two previous tax years More days here than in any other country during the tax year For an arriver someone not resident in the UK for the previous three tax years the test will work as follows Fewer than 45 days in the UK means you will always be non resident 45 89 days you will be resident if four or more part three factors apply 90 119 days you will be resident if three or more part three factors apply 120 182 days you will be resident if two or more part three factors apply 183 days or more you will always be resident For a leaver some resident in the UK in one more of the previous three tax years the test will work as follows Fewer than 10 days in the UK means you will always be non resident 10 44 days you will be resident if four or more part three factors apply 45 89 days you will be resident if three or more part three factors apply 90 119 days you will be resident if two or more part three factors apply 120 182 days you will be resident if one or more factors apply 183 days or more you will always be resident in the UK The test comes as a relief for many by simplifying the factors that deem residence and providing more clarity for individuals One very positive outcome of this test will be lifestyle and social ties If

    Original URL path: http://www.cheesman.co.uk/uk-resident-or-non-resident-whats-the-difference-2/ (2016-04-25)
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  • Tax Relief on Donations to Charity - Cheesman Accountants
    needs to be made on your tax return if you are sent one known as extending the basic rate band This means that the basic tax rate limit of 35 000 for 2011 12 is extended by the amount you wish to donate For example if you wish to donate 1 000 to charity then 1 000 will be added to the basic rate making it 36 000 that you pay 20 tax on It is also possible to carry back the Gift Aid donation to the previous tax year so long as you have paid enough tax in that year to cover any donations you wish to make The request for this carry back relief must be made at the same time as the completion of your Self Assessment Tax Return for the year in which you wish the claim to be included You cannot change a tax return in order to carry back a donation If you have already submitted your tax return you must include the Gift Aid donation in the current tax year If you don t complete tax returns you can make a Gift Aid donation using a declaration form One form is enough to include all donations you wish to make It is important to record details of all your Gift Aid donations and you will need to keep HMRC informed if You are a higher rate taxpayer You claim age related personal allowance marriage allowance or tax credits and You want to carry back a Gift Aid donation Contact us for further details Phone 020 7354 3914 Email The content of this document is intended for general guidance only and where relevant represents our understanding of current law and HM Revenue and Customs practice Action should not be taken without seeking professional advice

    Original URL path: http://www.cheesman.co.uk/tax-relief-on-donations-to-charity-2/ (2016-04-25)
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  • Domicile Rules - Cheesman Accountants
    the remittance basis of taxation has had to pay the annual long term residents charge of 30 000 The government s proposals include increasing the current annual charge of 30 000 to 50 000 for non domiciled individuals who have been resident in the UK for 12 or more tax years It is also proposed to remove the tax charge when non domiciled individuals remit foreign income or capital gains to the UK for commercial investment in UK businesses Contact us for further details Phone 020 7354 3914 Email The content of this document is intended for general guidance only and where relevant represents our understanding of current law and HM Revenue and Customs practice Action should not be taken without seeking professional advice No responsibility for loss by any person acting or refraining from action as a result of the material in this document can be accepted and we cannot assume legal liability for any errors or omissions this document may contain Cheesmans March 2011 All rights reserved About Carol Cheesman View all posts by Carol Cheesman Subscribe Subscribe to our e mail newsletter to receive updates Related Posts Changes to Capital Gains Tax affecting residential property owners who

    Original URL path: http://www.cheesman.co.uk/domicile-rules-2/ (2016-04-25)
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