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  • we saw fluctuations in the gene expression patterns from one set of assays to the next so we couldn t rely on the results SP A gene expression patterns were not as stable as in the workstation which tells us the oxygen tension in the incubator just wasn t stable enough We see a strong consistency in the results obtained with the workstation I am very happy with the Hypoxystation

    Original URL path: http://www.dwscientific.co.uk/about-us/testimonials/detail/popup.php?testimonial_id=85 (2016-02-11)
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  • and or adapt to conditions of oxygen and nutrient deprivation The Signalling and Cancer Metabolism Team led by Dr George Poulogiannis uses high throughput technologies including mass spectrometry based metabolomics and utilizes the Seahorse XF Analyzer to measure the basal oxygen consumption and glycolysis rates in order to reveal the metabolic dependencies of breast cancer driven alterations We are using a Whitley i2 Instrument Workstation to study the signalling and

    Original URL path: http://www.dwscientific.co.uk/about-us/testimonials/detail/popup.php?testimonial_id=81 (2016-02-11)
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  • reproducible results In Australia more than 10 000 people die from heart failure every year It remains the most common cause of hospital admissions for people aged over 65 however it can affect anyone regardless of age or gender Today The Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute has 13 laboratories across five research divisions working with a single vision to reduce the incidence severity and impact of heart diseases While their

    Original URL path: http://www.dwscientific.co.uk/about-us/testimonials/detail/popup.php?testimonial_id=69 (2016-02-11)
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  • Heart Foundation Centre of Research Excellence at King s College London His research focuses on vascular dysfunction induced by oxidative stress in diseases such as atherosclerosis pre eclampsia and diabetes Until recently Professor Mann s team used a CO 2 incubator which enabled them to reduce the level of oxygen but did not provide an accurate control to achieve well defined oxygen environments for long term cell culture studies It was also necessary to remove the cells from the incubator in order to work with them exposing them periodically to higher levels of oxygen Through a research and development collaboration between Professor Mann and Dr Siow with Don Whitley Scientific their group now uses a workstation to conduct experiments in vascular cells under well defined oxygen environments providing results that would have been very difficult to obtain in a standard CO 2 incubator According to Professor Mann The Whitley Workstation has provided us with a system that allows us to control oxygen concentrations accurately We can manipulate cells under low oxygen conditions and continue to conduct experiments under well defined environmental conditions The design of this workstation has also allowed us to use other essential equipment inside the chamber such

    Original URL path: http://www.dwscientific.co.uk/about-us/testimonials/detail/popup.php?testimonial_id=64 (2016-02-11)
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  • H35 Hypoxystation to provide a well controlled hypoxic environment in which to culture mammalian cells over short time periods 30 minutes to 4 days mainly using 1 and 0 1 oxygen tensions We also use it to produce hypoxia reoxygenation cycles to recapitulate some specific disease phenotypes We have had the system in the laboratory here for 6 months although I have previously used another H35 for 18 months and before that used a different make of hypoxia workstation for 6 years In my laboratory four people use it and it is in service almost 24 7 The key features of the Hypoxystation are the ability to control both oxygen and CO 2 levels as well as being able to set a programme to cycle between different oxygen tensions multiple times overnight It goes without saying that as with all mammalian tissue culture we also need to have excellent temperature control and humidity for all of our experiments In addition in our experience the H35 uses less nitrogen than other similar instruments reducing the cost of experiments The precise control of oxygen tension by the H35 has improved the quality of our results considerably Also a previous instrument I used

    Original URL path: http://www.dwscientific.co.uk/about-us/testimonials/detail/popup.php?testimonial_id=63 (2016-02-11)
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  • acidic pH low nutrients and high catabolites and contains cells with characteristics different to those of normal cells Tumour hypoxia has shown to be a prognostic marker of disease progression and can influence the outcome of chemotherapy and radiotherapy Targeting hypoxic cells using conventional therapies has proved difficult However as this environment is one unique to solid tumours it is a potential target for therapeutic intervention using drugs designed to act selectively on these cells The latest research has focused on understanding the biology of hypoxic tumour areas and developing anti cancer drugs that are effective in low oxygen environments Creating the right atmosphere When carrying out any type of cell research scientists aim to recreate in the laboratory in vitro the same conditions as found in the body in vivo Precise measurement and control of oxygen tension are critically important in biological tumour models Most hypoxia research is carried out at below 5 and typically between 0 2 and 0 5 Technology that can provide accurate control and measurement of gas concentrations is essential in order to study tumour mechanisms and perform candidate drug testing under relevant and reproducible conditions The importance of replicating in vivo oxygen levels in vitro has also been proposed beyond cancer research Currently most cell biology research is done in an environment with normal atmospheric oxygen levels of around 21 The cells of our body are used to much less than this usually in the range of 10 down to 0 5 When cells are cultured they are usually kept in an incubator with 0 2 oxygen However when removed for manipulation they are exposed to atmospheric oxygen levels Chandan and colleagues proposed that exposing cells to an unnaturally rich oxygen environment triggers cellular stress and significant physiological changes In order to maintain truly representative physiological conditions workstations offering tight control of gas levels temperature and humidity are recommended for cell research Targeting tumour cells Dr Roger Phillips at the University of Bradford s Institute of Cancer Therapeutics researches tumour hypoxia and the biological and therapeutic aspects associated with it Dr Phillips team use a specialised workstation Hypoxystation Don Whitley Scientific to replicate the tumour environment They carry out cellular assays to investigate the anti cancer effects of different compounds over a closely controlled range of oxygen tensions Specifically they are researching drugs which are designed to be activated under hypoxic conditions These are pro drugs inactive compounds which are metabolised to become cytotoxic Designed in conjunction with Dr Phillips himself the modified atmosphere workstation can be used for cell biology research requiring normoxic hypoxic and anoxic conditions It offers precise control of oxygen and carbon dioxide as well as temperature and relative humidity With a rapid response to user selected conditions oxygen can be controlled in 0 1 increments from 0 1 to 20 and carbon dioxide in 0 1 increments from 0 1 to 15 By keeping tight control over conditions the workstation allows cells to be manipulated in situ without altering

    Original URL path: http://www.dwscientific.co.uk/about-us/testimonials/detail/popup.php?testimonial_id=61 (2016-02-11)
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  • Liverpool Mini-Exhibition
    from better control of oxygen carbon dioxide temperature and humidity we can come to you Don Whitley Scientific today announced the first in a series of UK events using our sophisticated new demonstration truck Now you don t have to travel to see the latest innovations in controlled atmosphere cell culture workstations we can come to you High resolution control of O 2 CO 2 temperature and humidity Automated sensor calibration High classification HEPA filtration User programmed oxygen profiling Automated sterile humidification system Workstations of increasing size and complexity for housing instruments Staff and students at the University of Liverpool are invited to the Don Whitley Scientific mobile laboratory to find out how the latest innovations in modified atmosphere cell culture workstations could improve their research This MINI EXHIBITION will take place on 9 nd March 2016 from 10am to 3pm at Biosciences Car Park University of Liverpool Crown Street L69 7ZB For those whose research involves cell tissue culture and who want to maintain physiologically relevant conditions in which to culture and manipulate cells then the Whitley Hypoxystation should be of interest Whitley Workstations allow users to control their cell culture atmosphere in a more accurate and reliable manner when compared to conventional incubators increased accuracy and reliability that is reflected in experimental results A number of researchers at the University of Liverpool are already making use of Whitley workstations to facilitate their research Dr Michael Cross in the Department of Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology uses his H35 to simulate the physiological in vivo oxygen levels when he cultures cardiac spheroids in vitro He also makes use of the oxygen profiling system to lower the oxygen levels for set periods of time in order to simulate ischemia reperfusion Dr Violane See in the Institute for Integrative Biology uses her H35 to simulate the hypoxic tumour microenvironment in order to study the link between tumour hypoxia and metastasis Some of the research areas in which our other customers are working include Glioblastoma Autoimmune Diseases Reproductive and Perinatal Biology Cell Invasion and Metastasis Drug Toxicity Metabolism Inflammation Stem Cells Molecular Biology Cancer Research Attendees will be able to share coffee and pastries and find out how using a Whitley Workstation could improve their research We will also be holding a free prize draw to win a Nespresso U Coffee Machine by Magimix Leave a Reply Click here to cancel reply You must be logged in to post a comment Search the Blog Search for Search Categories Anaerobic Australia Case Study Exhibitions Germany Hypoxystations News Overseas Exhibitions Press Releases Useful Links Recent Posts Liverpool Mini Exhibition A crucial update for Dr Rob Fagan at The University of Sheffield Don Whitley Scientific visit Arab Health 2016 Hypoxic Microenvironments Cell Press Nucleus Visit HypOxygen at the AACR Meeting in San Diego Archives February 2016 January 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 September 2015 August 2015 July 2015 June 2015 May 2015 April 2015 March 2015 February 2015 January 2015 December 2014 November 2014

    Original URL path: http://www.dwscientific.co.uk/blog/liverpool-mini-exhibition/ (2016-02-11)
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  • A crucial update for Dr Rob Fagan at The University of Sheffield
    s Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology Rob Fagan s group study the interaction between Clostridium difficile and its host Until recently the group were monitoring their samples within a Whitley MG500 Workstation They will continue to use this older unit but have now acquired the much more sophisticated A35 Workstation to use alongside it The amount of atmospheric control that the A35 offers is greatly beneficial to work of this type and real time feedback on the conditions within the cabinet makes monitoring results far more accurate The rapid airlock system also makes the removal and addition of samples an efficient process all whilst maintaining stable atmospheric conditions Our work focusses on the secretion assembly structure and function of Clostridium difficile surface structures in particular the S layer The A35 is an addition to our existing anaerobic work space We started the lab 3 years ago with a recommissioned MG500 The A35 is a much more advanced piece of kit allowing much greater control and monitoring of our anaerobic growth conditions For some of our work this capability is absolutely crucial Dr Robert Fagan The University Of Sheffield Leave a Reply Click here to cancel reply You must be logged in to post a comment Search the Blog Search for Search Categories Anaerobic Australia Case Study Exhibitions Germany Hypoxystations News Overseas Exhibitions Press Releases Useful Links Recent Posts Liverpool Mini Exhibition A crucial update for Dr Rob Fagan at The University of Sheffield Don Whitley Scientific visit Arab Health 2016 Hypoxic Microenvironments Cell Press Nucleus Visit HypOxygen at the AACR Meeting in San Diego Archives February 2016 January 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 September 2015 August 2015 July 2015 June 2015 May 2015 April 2015 March 2015 February 2015 January 2015 December 2014 November 2014 October 2014

    Original URL path: http://www.dwscientific.co.uk/blog/a-crucial-update-for-dr-rob-fagan-at-sheffield/ (2016-02-11)
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