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  • Fire extinguisher commissioning - Fire and Safety Centre
    Aid Products Fireproof Storage Other Safety Products Fire Brigade Equipment Fire Safety Signs and Notices Personal Protection Equipment and Clothing Fire Log Books and Safety Manuals Emergency Evacuation Devices Spill Control Products Winter Safety Products Water Mist Information About Us Advice Blog Service Maintenance FAQ Contact Us Login Register 0 Item s 0 00 ex VAT 0 00 inc VAT Tweet Document Holders Fireproof Filing Cabinets Fire Resistant Cabinets Fireproof Data Safes Security Cash Safes Fire extinguisher commissioning Fire and Safety Centre BS 5306 3 2009 sets out the process for commissioning fire extinguishers in section 4 1 This section states that the commissioning of an extinguisher should be carried out by a competent person The standard defines a competent person as person with the qualifications training and experience with access to the relevant tools equipment and information manuals and knowledge of any special procedures recommended by the manufacturer of an extinguisher to carry out the relevant maintenance procedures Commissioning takes place when the fire extinguisher first comes into service Please Note Fire and Safety Centre offer a commissioning option at the point of sale for a fire extinguisher The commissioning is carried out by Fire Safety Services UK Limited

    Original URL path: http://www.fireandsafetycentre.co.uk/Fire-Extinguisher-Advice/31/Fire_extinguisher_commissioning.html (2016-02-17)
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  • Fire Blankets - Fire and Safety Centre
    Extinguisher Consumables Discount Safety Packs Fire Blankets Hose Reels Fire Buckets Fire Alarms Detectors Escape Ladders First Aid Products Fireproof Storage Other Safety Products Fire Brigade Equipment Fire Safety Signs and Notices Personal Protection Equipment and Clothing Fire Log Books and Safety Manuals Emergency Evacuation Devices Spill Control Products Winter Safety Products Water Mist Information About Us Advice Blog Service Maintenance FAQ Contact Us Login Register 0 Item s 0 00 ex VAT 0 00 inc VAT Tweet Document Holders Fireproof Filing Cabinets Fire Resistant Cabinets Fireproof Data Safes Security Cash Safes Fire Blankets Fire and Safety Centre How does a fire blanket work A fire blanket is a simple fire extinguishing device manufactured in flame proof materials typically glass wool Fire blankets provide additional fire safety to your fire extinguishers mainly in a kitchen or catering environment Most commonly they are used to extinguish small contained fires such as chip pan fires in a kitchen paper fires in the office barbeques and engine compartment fires The larger sizes can also be used as a body wrap ideal for children and young adults and especially useful to childminders for safe evacuation As the name implies the fire blanket once released from its container is opened to its full size and placed over the fire to smother the flames Our fire blankets are designed for quick release and deployment and ideally should be sited in view for emergency access close to the area of fire risk In the home where wall hanging may be obtrusive the blanket can be hung on the inside of a kitchen cupboard door close to the cooking area Once deployed over the fire leave for several minutes until all signs of fire have disappeared Normally fire blankets are not reusable if the outer sleeve is damaged

    Original URL path: http://www.fireandsafetycentre.co.uk/Fire-Extinguisher-Advice/10/Fire_Blankets.html (2016-02-17)
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  • Hose Reels - Fire and Safety Centre
    and Stands Extinguisher Consumables Discount Safety Packs Fire Blankets Hose Reels Fire Buckets Fire Alarms Detectors Escape Ladders First Aid Products Fireproof Storage Other Safety Products Fire Brigade Equipment Fire Safety Signs and Notices Personal Protection Equipment and Clothing Fire Log Books and Safety Manuals Emergency Evacuation Devices Spill Control Products Winter Safety Products Water Mist Information About Us Advice Blog Service Maintenance FAQ Contact Us Login Register 0 Item s 0 00 ex VAT 0 00 inc VAT Tweet Document Holders Fireproof Filing Cabinets Fire Resistant Cabinets Fireproof Data Safes Security Cash Safes Hose Reels Fire and Safety Centre Fire hose reels are used to provide a controlled supply of water to combat any potential fire risk involving combustible solids Class A and require connection to a pressurised source of water either from the mains supply or a storage tank The length of a fully extended fire hose is typically 30 meters with a hose diameter of 19mm or 25mm outside diameter These appliances are designed to deliver as a minimum 0 33L of water per second A control nozzle attached to the end of the hose enables the operator to control the direction and rate of flow of water to the fire All our fire hose reels come with a unique ball valve shut off device a nylon plastic or solid brass hose reel nozzle jubilee clip and a mounting bracket Hose reels should be securely fixed approx 1m from the floor and care taken not to place obstructions adjacent the hose that my prevent deployment in the case of a fire emergency Swivel bracket units allow the reel to be folded back into a recess or cabinet Water is a conductor and hose reels should not be used to control electrical fires unless it is possible to

    Original URL path: http://www.fireandsafetycentre.co.uk/Fire-Extinguisher-Advice/11/Hose_Reels.html (2016-02-17)
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  • Safety in the Home - Smoke Alarms - Fire and Safety Centre
    are very sensitive to flaming fires such as chip pan fires and will detect this type of fire before smoke gets too thick Optical alarms also known as Photoelectric Smoke alarms are more expensive but can be more effective at detecting slow burning fires such as smouldering foam filled furniture or overheated wiring earlier than ionisation alarms They are also less prone to go off accidentally and so are best for ground floor hallways and for single storey homes and apartments When purchasing a smoke alarm ensure it complies with British Standard 5446 Part 1 BS 5446 1 and preferably carries the British Standard Kitemark The popular types operate from a battery usually 9V and are provided with a test button to check the alarm is in working order 10 year long life battery units and mains powered versions are also available although the latter must be installed by a qualified electrician Installing and Maintaining your alarm Fit smoke alarms on each level in your home ideally on the ceiling in hallways and landings and where you are most likely to hear the alarm Position centrally on the ceiling if possible and away from electrical lights as these give off heat If you have a TV or other large electrical appliance in any of the bedrooms or use a bedroom as a computer study fit a smoke alarm in the bedroom Don t fit a smoke alarm near cooking appliances as the cooking fumes will activate the alarm Battery powered alarms are not difficult to install and can be fitted in minutes Follow the instructions in the pack and ensure the battery ies are fitted Press the test button to check the alarm is working Keep free from dust and test them once a week by pressing the test button

    Original URL path: http://www.fireandsafetycentre.co.uk/Fire-Extinguisher-Advice/14/Safety_in_the_Home_-_Smoke_Alarms.html (2016-02-17)
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  • Portable Site Alarms - Fire and Safety Centre
    Cabinets Fire Resistant Cabinets Fireproof Data Safes Security Cash Safes Portable Site Alarms Fire and Safety Centre Alerting employees to a fire incident and ensuring safe evacuation is a paramount responsibility of the Fire Marshall and Safety Officer On Construction sites industrial premises and open air events it is not always possible to provide automatic wired alarms and even if provided automatic sirens cannot provide staff with urgent information in an emergency situation This is where manual alarms and hailers play their part Fire and Safety Centre recommend several new product solutions to tackle this problem A compact and cost effective Emergency Gas Horn powered by a pressurised non toxic gas canister is small enough to be carried in an emergency kit bag It produces a high decibel siren with an audible range up to 1500metres Replacement gas canisters are also available A battery powered Mini Megaphone offers a convenient compact design with press to talk trigger and integral siren to alert staff and ensure essential information is communicated For larger sites a high powered Megaphone is available with anti howl microphone press to talk trigger volume control and shoulder strap Stand alone portable fire alarms are particularly useful for construction sites outdoor applications and where wired alarms are impractical The market leading Howler site alarms offer the ideal solution Battery powered with fast push button activation they can be installed in minutes and are completely portable The Fire Marshall should be easily identifable to the people on site It also gives clear authority to the wearer making it easier to command attention A monogrammed high visibility vest is highly effective and lightweight Its advisable to select at least one size larger than your standard fit so that it can be worn over existing work clothing with ease To ensure

    Original URL path: http://www.fireandsafetycentre.co.uk/Fire-Extinguisher-Advice/17/Portable_Site_Alarms.html (2016-02-17)
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  • Spill Control Guidelines - Fire and Safety Centre
    Detectors Escape Ladders First Aid Products Fireproof Storage Other Safety Products Fire Brigade Equipment Fire Safety Signs and Notices Personal Protection Equipment and Clothing Fire Log Books and Safety Manuals Emergency Evacuation Devices Spill Control Products Winter Safety Products Water Mist Information About Us Advice Blog Service Maintenance FAQ Contact Us Login Register 0 Item s 0 00 ex VAT 0 00 inc VAT Tweet Document Holders Fireproof Filing Cabinets Fire Resistant Cabinets Fireproof Data Safes Security Cash Safes Spill Control Guidelines Fire and Safety Centre Abstract from the Environment Agency Pollution Prevention Guideline PPG26 Spill kits containing materials such as leak sealing putty overdrums drain seals oil or chemical absorbents and personal protective equipment PPE should be located both within or near the storage area and also remote from it Consider providing a quarantine area where leaking containers can be placed safely It is advisable to have a leak sealing kit available at delivery and handling areas or other high risk locations to temporarily seal leaking drums It is also recommended that vehicles transporting drums and IBCs carry a spill kit Do not flush away spilt material or use dispersants Contain any spillage for proper off site disposal by a registered waste carrier and in high risk areas consider the use of cut off or isolation valves in the drainage system A detailed site drainage plan should be kept available to assist in the event of a spillage or fire A site incident response plan PPG21 Reference 11 should be drawn up to deal with leaking containers and spillages and all staff should be trained in its application in the use of related equipment and in the relevant health and safety issues Report any significant spillage to the Environment Agency on the Emergency Hotline 0800 80 70 60 The

    Original URL path: http://www.fireandsafetycentre.co.uk/Fire-Extinguisher-Advice/19/Spill_Control_Guidelines.html (2016-02-17)
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  • Guide to Evac Chairs
    when lifts are out of action Developed in America in the early 80s evac chairs have evolved considerably and a number of models are now available The themes which run through them are they can generally be operated by one individual they remove any requirement for manual handling they do not require great physical strength on the part of the operator they allow the individual riding in them to travel smoothly up or down stairs under the control of just one trained individual At their most basic level evac chairs such as the Evac Chair MK4 consist of a robustly constructed metal tubing frame and a canvas seat They fold for ease of storage and can be deployed in seconds More sophisticated models incorporate electric motors and tracks to grip any kind of stair surface and there is even a model capable of evacuating an individual still in their own wheelchair These powered evacuation chairs are sufficiently large to carry virtually any wheelchair including powered models and mobility scooters An alternative to the chair is ski pad evacuation The evac chair ski pad is for individuals unable to sit but this requires two people to operate it Extra value for investment in an evac chair can be delivered by the Goods Mate Powered Evacuation Chair which doubles up as a stock handling device capable of moving 120kg of goods up or down stairs as well as its emergency evacuation function When selecting an evac chair it is wise to consider the area in which you will need to move it For example are narrow corridors involved what is the weight of the individual in need of assistance do we need a powered evacuation chair or not will we need only to come down stairs or will we need to climb

    Original URL path: http://www.fireandsafetycentre.co.uk/Fire-Extinguisher-Advice/35/Guide_to_Evac_Chairs.html (2016-02-17)
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  • Smoke Alarm Legislation for Landlords | Fire and Safety Centre
    be exempt from the regulations These are the ones in which amenities such as a toilet personal washing facilities a kitchen or living room are shared between tenants and the landlord or members of the landlord s family Others which are excluded are Tenancies on a long lease granting rights of occupation for seven years or more Social housing owned by landlords who are registered providers Student halls of residence Hostels Care Homes Hospitals Any accommodation relating to health care provision If the building is rented under a licence agreement that doesn t have requirements for smoke and carbon monoxide detectors then from October 1st became the role of the licence holder to make sure they are fitted If the property is registered as a house of multiple occupation known as an HMO then its licence should already have that requirement written into it Smoke alarms and their locations The law says a smoke alarm must be fitted on every storey where at least one room is used wholey or partly as living accommodation of any kind For the purposes of this definition halls and landings are included On any floor sub divided into separate units occupied by multiple tenants an alarm should be fitted either in each unit but a communal one on a landing outside the flats on the same floor is also acceptable If a flat itself is on more than one storey alarms should be fitted on all floors The rules point out that it is crucial to position the alarm where it can be heard by everyone on that particular storey Although the regulations don t specify what type of alarm should be fitted it s suggested that the best option would be for a hard wired type so that the batteries can t be removed rendering the alarms useless Stand alone types are acceptable but it s recommended that models with a 10 year battery life should be chosen Placement tips If there is one alarm per floor best practice suggests that the downstairs hallway should have an optical smoke alarm and that the other floors should have ionisation smoke alarms Make sure the alarm can be heard from all bedrooms Put alarms at least 30cms from walls Put alarms at least 30cms away form light fittings or other ceiling fittings Carbon Monoxide alarms From October 1st 2015 every property occupied under licence or tenancy with an appliance that burns solid fuel must have a carbon monoxide detector in the same room as the appliance This covers Open fires Wood burners Agas Before October 1st it was a requirement of Building Regulations that Carbon Monoxide detectors had to be fitted whenever new appliances like this were installed Crucially the new law has been extended to cover rooms that already have solid fuel burning appliances all of which are required have detectors installed Placement tips Carbon Monoxide detectors should be placed Between two and four metres away from the appliance About 1 5 metres from

    Original URL path: http://www.fireandsafetycentre.co.uk/Fire-Extinguisher-Advice/38/Smoke_Alarm_Legislation_for_Landlords.html (2016-02-17)
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