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  • Uncategorized | First Edition Translations | Page 3
    are crammed with eager cyclists keen to ride the route oh hang on they re always here it is Cambridge after all Even First Edition have got into the act providing translations for a local hotel and we ve also been part of a rather lovely book on the history of the event see picture translating it into French some years ago Talking of which the origins of the Tour de France are all rather interesting It seems to have started with a soldier Alfred Dreyfus being convicted and later exonerated of selling military secrets to the Germans Things quickly became quite heated and it turned into quite the cause célèbre dividing France Demonstrations were staged by both sides with one at the Auteuil racecourse in Paris ending with businessman Jules Albert de Dion hitting the president of France over the head with a walking stick The sporting press jumped all over it and to cut a long story short some particularly biased reporting by mega sports newspaper Le Vélo resulted in de Dion opening a rival paper L Auto It was not however the success the backers hoped for so a crisis meeting was held in 1902 at which the most junior journalist and last to speak Géo Lefèvre suggested an unprecedented six day cycle race around France Et voilà the Tour de France was born and raced its first race in 1903 So there you go It all kicks off in Leeds on Saturday and will reach our lovely city on Monday morning The First Edition staff will be battling in despite road closures and shortened bus rides and are hoping to see some of the action at lunchtime the start being just around the corner from our office Alors bonne chance aux cyclistes Thanks for wikipedia com for the history lesson Posted on July 2 2014 Author Bridget Categories Uncategorized Leave a comment on Translation musings Tour de France coming this way soon Translation Musings Spring into spring Google the font of all knowledge let s be honest have today announced the first day of Spring with a rather lovely little flower based doodle This meant some discussion in the office because a number of us thought it was tomorrow But Google and Wikipedia do confirm that the exact date of the Spring Equinox does vary due to the drifting of calendars and so on and can be anywhere between the 20th and the 25th of March So that s okay Continue reading Translation Musings Spring into spring Posted on March 20 2014 May 13 2014 Author Bridget Categories Language Uncategorized Tags language Leave a comment on Translation Musings Spring into spring Translation Musings Word of the Day And the word for this rather changeable Tuesday is hyperbole This caused a group of us a long discussion and much googling last night over the pronunciation There were two schools of thought one right and one wrong One is that it is pronounced hy per bowl like Super

    Original URL path: http://www.firstedit.co.uk/blog/category/uncategorized/page/3/ (2016-02-08)
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  • Why use a professional translation agency? | First Edition Translations
    2013 February 2013 January 2013 December 2012 November 2012 October 2012 September 2012 August 2012 July 2012 June 2012 May 2012 April 2012 March 2012 February 2012 January 2012 December 2011 November 2011 October 2011 September 2011 August 2011 July 2011 June 2011 Categories Advent Calendar Business Case studies Export First Edition Translations Language Literature Miscellaneous Musings Primavera Translation Uncategorized World events Meta Log in Entries RSS Comments RSS WordPress org Why use a professional translation agency You have a document to be translated perhaps a legal contract patient information leaflet marketing material or even just a simple email You are confronted with a myriad of options You could find a qualified independent translator or maybe use someone you know who speaks the language or you could even resort to a quick and cheap web based solution Alternatively you could save yourself time stress and yes even money and use a well established reliable and professional translation agency Here at First Edition Translations we have a strong team of project managers who monitor the progress of assignments at all stages taking the hassle and stress away from you We adhere to a strict code of conduct by working with qualified

    Original URL path: http://www.firstedit.co.uk/blog/2013/07/why-use-a-professional-translation-agency/ (2016-02-08)
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  • What about machine translation? | First Edition Translations
    February 2013 January 2013 December 2012 November 2012 October 2012 September 2012 August 2012 July 2012 June 2012 May 2012 April 2012 March 2012 February 2012 January 2012 December 2011 November 2011 October 2011 September 2011 August 2011 July 2011 June 2011 Categories Advent Calendar Business Case studies Export First Edition Translations Language Literature Miscellaneous Musings Primavera Translation Uncategorized World events Meta Log in Entries RSS Comments RSS WordPress org What about machine translation There are certain programmes freely available that can give you an instant translation straight to your phone or computer Very handy But how do they work and can you trust them Well there is no doubt that they can be very useful if you re looking for a single word a common phrase or just the gist of meaning for example I myself used a well known web based translation service recently to name my kitten He was a little bit of a weed and I wanted an Italian name so in went runt and out came Nano voila A quick and dirty solution for my small and very cute request And the reason for the strange choice of piccie although who needs an excuse to have a Friday cute kitten pic But it is important to know how these programmes work They operate via a library of documents and patterns When a translation is generated the program looks for the pattern of words in documents that have already been translated by human translators It then makes an intelligent guess as to what an appropriate translation should be This process is called statistical machine translation So far so good But unsurprisingly this process is prone to enormous error and there is no shortage of examples of often hilarious mistranslations just put a foreign language news story

    Original URL path: http://www.firstedit.co.uk/blog/2013/07/what-about-machine-translation/ (2016-02-08)
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  • Top Translation Tip #3 | First Edition Translations
    December 2013 November 2013 October 2013 September 2013 August 2013 July 2013 June 2013 May 2013 April 2013 March 2013 February 2013 January 2013 December 2012 November 2012 October 2012 September 2012 August 2012 July 2012 June 2012 May 2012 April 2012 March 2012 February 2012 January 2012 December 2011 November 2011 October 2011 September 2011 August 2011 July 2011 June 2011 Categories Advent Calendar Business Case studies Export First Edition Translations Language Literature Miscellaneous Musings Primavera Translation Uncategorized World events Meta Log in Entries RSS Comments RSS WordPress org Top Translation Tip 3 What languages do you need This sounds like a simple question and most of the time the answer is pretty simple too We need to know what language the original is in the source and what language s it needs to be translated into the target But sometimes we might need a bit of extra information to ensure the right translator is used For example is it Traditional Cantonese or Simplified Mandarin Chinese European or Brazilian Portuguese South American or European Spanish The more information you are able to give at the very beginning of the project the easier it is to find the right translator

    Original URL path: http://www.firstedit.co.uk/blog/2013/02/top-translation-tip-3/ (2016-02-08)
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  • Happy Easter! | First Edition Translations
    2013 October 2013 September 2013 August 2013 July 2013 June 2013 May 2013 April 2013 March 2013 February 2013 January 2013 December 2012 November 2012 October 2012 September 2012 August 2012 July 2012 June 2012 May 2012 April 2012 March 2012 February 2012 January 2012 December 2011 November 2011 October 2011 September 2011 August 2011 July 2011 June 2011 Categories Advent Calendar Business Case studies Export First Edition Translations Language Literature Miscellaneous Musings Primavera Translation Uncategorized World events Meta Log in Entries RSS Comments RSS WordPress org Happy Easter Many people across the world will be celebrating this most important Christian festival It is linked to the Jewish Passover with its position in the calendar symbolism and even in many languages etymologically The word Easter has its roots in the Old English word Ēastre or Ēostre referring to the Eostur monath Ēostre month in Old English from the Germanic calendar The English monk scholar and translator Saint Bede wrote that the month was named after the Anglo Saxon pagan goddess Ēostre and that Ēostur monath was the equivalent to the month of April It is believed that many of our current Easter customs including hares and eggs were originally Germanic Although modern German uses the term Ostern Germanic Semitic Romance and Celtic languages generally use words deriving from the Latin Pascha which in turn derived from the Hebrew Pesach the festival of Passover In Spanish Easter is Pascua in Italian and Catalan Pasqua in Portuguese Páscoa and in Romanian Paşti The French Pâques also derives from the Latin word Likewise in modern Celtic languages in Welsh Pasg and in Cornish and Breton Pask In Irish Gaelic and Manx the initial p sound was subsequently redeveloped so the p was replaced with k giving us An Cháisc A Chàisg and Y

    Original URL path: http://www.firstedit.co.uk/blog/2012/04/happy-easter/ (2016-02-08)
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  • etymology | First Edition Translations
    World events Meta Log in Entries RSS Comments RSS WordPress org Tag etymology On the road or the wagon I had a great plan for the blog today Having spent a bit of time in Bodmin Jail last week as a visitor not an inmate I had some lovely jail based phrases to etymologise might ve made that word up So I was led to believe that the phrases o ne more for the road and on the wagon both came from the long journey from prison to hangman s noose It has often been claimed that one more for the road came from the habit of the local Inns offering prisoners a final drink on their way to the gallows Similarly if the prisoner refused or were refused this final drink they remained on the wagon Unfortunately this appears to be bunkum It seems we were just not that nice to the condemned much preferring to jeer and leer than refresh Continue reading On the road or the wagon Posted on November 6 2012 Author Bridget Categories Language Tags etymology language on the wagon one for the road Leave a comment on On the road or the wagon Happy Easter Many people across the world will be celebrating this most important Christian festival It is linked to the Jewish Passover with its position in the calendar symbolism and even in many languages etymologically The word Easter has its roots in the Old English word Ēastre or Ēostre referring to the Eostur monath Ēostre month in Old English from the Germanic calendar The English monk scholar and translator Saint Bede wrote that the month was named after the Anglo Saxon pagan goddess Ēostre and that Ēostur monath was the equivalent to the month of April It is believed that many

    Original URL path: http://www.firstedit.co.uk/blog/tag/etymology/ (2016-02-08)
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  • Fools around the world | First Edition Translations
    RSS WordPress org Fools around the world In Poland it is called Prima Aprilis and in Hungary Bolondok napja In Germany they send someone into April with a prank on ersten April and in France and Italy the day is called Poisson D Avril and Pesce d aprile respectively literally translating to April April s Fish where people try to unobtrusively attach paper fish to others backs The Scots have Hunt the Gowk Day with a Gowk being a cuckoo or fool Victims are sent from house to house with the message Dinna laugh an dinna smile but hunt the gowk another mile The day moves to December in many Spanish speaking countries with Día de los Santos Inocentes Day of the Holy Innocents Originally a sad remembrance of the slaughter of the innocent children by King Herod it has evolved into a much lighter day with pranks and trickery Here we have plain old April Fool s Day and it s a funny old tradition isn t it Although it is celebrated in many countries across the world no one is entirely sure where it came from It is known to date back to at least the 16th century but April tom foollery may have also been referred to by Chaucer in his Canterbury Tales as far back as 1392 One of the most popular theories however seems to be that it was first celebrated soon after the adoption of the Gregorian Calendar Before that most of Europe celebrated the beginning of the new year during the Christian Feast of Annunciation starting on 25th March and finishing with a bang on 1 st April with parties and celebrations going on through the night When the Gregorian Calendar was introduced in 1582 New Year s Day was moved to January

    Original URL path: http://www.firstedit.co.uk/blog/2012/03/fools-around-the-world/ (2016-02-08)
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  • international festivals | First Edition Translations
    Export First Edition Translations Language Literature Miscellaneous Musings Primavera Translation Uncategorized World events Meta Log in Entries RSS Comments RSS WordPress org Tag international festivals Fools around the world In Poland it is called Prima Aprilis and in Hungary Bolondok napja In Germany they send someone into April with a prank on ersten April and in France and Italy the day is called Poisson D Avril and Pesce d aprile respectively literally translating to April April s Fish where people try to unobtrusively attach paper fish to others backs The Scots have Hunt the Gowk Day with a Gowk being a cuckoo or fool Victims are sent from house to house with the message Dinna laugh an dinna smile but hunt the gowk another mile The day moves to December in many Spanish speaking countries with Día de los Santos Inocentes Day of the Holy Innocents Originally a sad remembrance of the slaughter of the innocent children by King Herod it has evolved into a much lighter day with pranks and trickery Here we have plain old April Fool s Day and it s a funny old tradition isn t it Although it is celebrated in many countries across the world no one is entirely sure where it came from It is known to date back to at least the 16th century but April tom foollery may have also been referred to by Chaucer in his Canterbury Tales as far back as 1392 One of the most popular theories however seems to be that it was first celebrated soon after the adoption of the Gregorian Calendar Before that most of Europe celebrated the beginning of the new year during the Christian Feast of Annunciation starting on 25th March and finishing with a bang on 1 st April with parties and

    Original URL path: http://www.firstedit.co.uk/blog/tag/international-festivals/ (2016-02-08)
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