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  • Translation musings: the quirks of language | First Edition Translations
    2013 September 2013 August 2013 July 2013 June 2013 May 2013 April 2013 March 2013 February 2013 January 2013 December 2012 November 2012 October 2012 September 2012 August 2012 July 2012 June 2012 May 2012 April 2012 March 2012 February 2012 January 2012 December 2011 November 2011 October 2011 September 2011 August 2011 July 2011 June 2011 Categories Advent Calendar Business Case studies Export First Edition Translations Language Literature Miscellaneous Musings Primavera Translation Uncategorized World events Meta Log in Entries RSS Comments RSS WordPress org Translation musings the quirks of language Welcome to a new series of mini blog posts looking at some of the rules and quirks of different languages We re taking a bite size look at Korean today thanks to the marvellous wisdom of translator Steven Bammel You can find out loads more about Korean on his blog here One thing to watch out for when translating into Korean says Steve is the colour red In particular names in red The only names to appear in red in Korean culture are those of the dead and it is therefore considered extremely unlucky for the names of the living This is not a common issue admittedly but one

    Original URL path: http://www.firstedit.co.uk/blog/2014/09/translation-musings-the-quirks-of-language/ (2016-02-09)
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  • Translation musings: new words for old | First Edition Translations
    August 2013 July 2013 June 2013 May 2013 April 2013 March 2013 February 2013 January 2013 December 2012 November 2012 October 2012 September 2012 August 2012 July 2012 June 2012 May 2012 April 2012 March 2012 February 2012 January 2012 December 2011 November 2011 October 2011 September 2011 August 2011 July 2011 June 2011 Categories Advent Calendar Business Case studies Export First Edition Translations Language Literature Miscellaneous Musings Primavera Translation Uncategorized World events Meta Log in Entries RSS Comments RSS WordPress org Translation musings new words for old Our wonderful language is forever evolving with new words and popular phrases going in and out of fashion all the time And every year a group of eminents decide which words should be allowed into the dictionary The first stage of acceptance for the word is online they ll make it to the paper copy if they hang around long enough So which words have made it into the Oxford online dictionary this year Well you ve got to love it haven t you what about Amazeballs Proving to be more popular in the UK than over the pond this appears to have captured our imagination I have a horrible feeling it may have started in Essex or Chelsea but hey ho Adorbs an abbreviation of adorable however is more popular in the US I think it can stay there Other newbies to join the gang are YOLO the horribly abused abbreviation for You Only Live Once and binge watch the activity of watching multiple episodes of a TV series one after another Popular in our house but only achieved successfully by the teenagers my husband and I are still only on Episode 6 of Breaking Bad fail Others worthy of note are acquihire I have no idea what that means click

    Original URL path: http://www.firstedit.co.uk/blog/2014/08/translation-musings-new-words-for-old/ (2016-02-09)
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  • Translation musings: the language of WW1 | First Edition Translations
    2012 January 2012 December 2011 November 2011 October 2011 September 2011 August 2011 July 2011 June 2011 Categories Advent Calendar Business Case studies Export First Edition Translations Language Literature Miscellaneous Musings Primavera Translation Uncategorized World events Meta Log in Entries RSS Comments RSS WordPress org Translation musings the language of WW1 I don t know if you did but my family sat in the dark last night with our one candle burning as a mark of respect and to commemorate the beginning of WW1 The letters and poems that were read out during the memorial service were moving and poignant and most of us still remember someone in our family who was involved in the Great War I am looking forward to some of the coming events although that seems an odd turn of phrase for the circumstances And new phrases and slang are one of the many things that have remained as reminders of that tumultuous time The Guardian Education pages recently put together a guide to some of the slang that came out of WW1 A very familiar phrase from that time is probably No Man s Land the space between lines of opposing trenches Although this was commonly in use before 1914 it has certainly become evocative of that time A number of the phrases listed by The Guardian derive from Hindi as many of our slang words do coming as they do from the large number of troops stationed in India at that time Dekko for example as in let s take a dekko or look comes from dekho the Hindi word for look Cushy also comes from Hindi khush meaning pleasure And surely the word most used usually in a posh British accent from a chap with a rather spiffy uniform and splendid moustache is

    Original URL path: http://www.firstedit.co.uk/blog/2014/08/translation-musings-the-language-of-ww1/ (2016-02-09)
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  • Translation musings: the joys of English pronunciation | First Edition Translations
    September 2014 August 2014 July 2014 June 2014 May 2014 April 2014 March 2014 February 2014 January 2014 December 2013 November 2013 October 2013 September 2013 August 2013 July 2013 June 2013 May 2013 April 2013 March 2013 February 2013 January 2013 December 2012 November 2012 October 2012 September 2012 August 2012 July 2012 June 2012 May 2012 April 2012 March 2012 February 2012 January 2012 December 2011 November 2011 October 2011 September 2011 August 2011 July 2011 June 2011 Categories Advent Calendar Business Case studies Export First Edition Translations Language Literature Miscellaneous Musings Primavera Translation Uncategorized World events Meta Log in Entries RSS Comments RSS WordPress org Translation musings the joys of English pronunciation Popping into our in boxes this week was a whole poem on the vagaries of English language pronunciation It s all good fun but makes you realise how difficult English is to learn as your first language let alone second third etc Let s just take two little letters e and a and put them together How do you pronounce ea Well you could pronounce it ee as in tea Or ai as in break Or maybe er as in hearse Then again it could

    Original URL path: http://www.firstedit.co.uk/blog/2014/06/translation-musings-the-joys-of-english-pronunciation/ (2016-02-09)
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  • Translation Musings: Okey Dokey Mikey! | First Edition Translations
    Export First Edition Translations Language Literature Miscellaneous Musings Primavera Translation Uncategorized World events Meta Log in Entries RSS Comments RSS WordPress org Translation Musings Okey Dokey Mikey Today we re going to look at the origins of okay How old is it and where did it come from And what on earth has Mikey got to do with it Extra house points if you know the answer to the last one Well the easy answer is there is no easy answer As with so much in the world of etymology no one is absolutely sure According to Oxford Dictionaries there are loads of places it could have come from although all equally unproved and unlikely Could it have come from the Scottish och aye yes or the Greek ola kala it is good Or maybe it s French it has been suggested it comes from aux Cayes Cayes being a port in Haiti with a reputation for good rum or au quai to the quay as said by French speaking dockers It certainly became popular in the mid 19th century USA so maybe the theory that it comes from the Choctaw Indian oke or okeh it is so could hold some water Or maybe the initials of a railway freight agent called Obediah Kelly More plausible but equally without hard historic evidence is that it perhaps came over with the slaves being similar to a word meaning all right yes indeed in various West African languages But probably none of the above The most popular explanation is that comes from orl korrekt a jokey misspelling of all correct used in the US in the 1830s It became more popular when used in the 1840 presidential campaign for the Democrat Martin Van Buren nicknamed Old Kinderhook after his birthplace in New

    Original URL path: http://www.firstedit.co.uk/blog/2014/05/translation-musings-okey-dokey-mikey/ (2016-02-09)
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  • Translation musings: bed and board | First Edition Translations
    2014 July 2014 June 2014 May 2014 April 2014 March 2014 February 2014 January 2014 December 2013 November 2013 October 2013 September 2013 August 2013 July 2013 June 2013 May 2013 April 2013 March 2013 February 2013 January 2013 December 2012 November 2012 October 2012 September 2012 August 2012 July 2012 June 2012 May 2012 April 2012 March 2012 February 2012 January 2012 December 2011 November 2011 October 2011 September 2011 August 2011 July 2011 June 2011 Categories Advent Calendar Business Case studies Export First Edition Translations Language Literature Miscellaneous Musings Primavera Translation Uncategorized World events Meta Log in Entries RSS Comments RSS WordPress org Translation musings bed and board So the inspiration for today s offering is two fold coming from the book I am reading and the fact that I m getting a bit excited about a couple of days away in a nice hotel The book is At Home A short history of private life by the incomparable Bill Bryson and is one of those how interesting books with a fascinating fact on every page Today s how interesting for me was about tables and chairs and the linguistic origins of the dining experience According to Bill and I have no reason to doubt him back in the middle ages the dining table was literally a board which hung on the wall until needed at which time it was placed on the knees of the diners to aid the eating experience Eventually the board came to represent the meal rather than just the bit of wood hence the term bed and board In case you were wondering that s where the hotel bit comes in The term banquet comes from the chairs or the French bench bancs to be exact Back in the day the chair was

    Original URL path: http://www.firstedit.co.uk/blog/2014/04/translation-musings-bed-and-board/ (2016-02-09)
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  • Translation musings: knock on wood… | First Edition Translations
    June 2014 May 2014 April 2014 March 2014 February 2014 January 2014 December 2013 November 2013 October 2013 September 2013 August 2013 July 2013 June 2013 May 2013 April 2013 March 2013 February 2013 January 2013 December 2012 November 2012 October 2012 September 2012 August 2012 July 2012 June 2012 May 2012 April 2012 March 2012 February 2012 January 2012 December 2011 November 2011 October 2011 September 2011 August 2011 July 2011 June 2011 Categories Advent Calendar Business Case studies Export First Edition Translations Language Literature Miscellaneous Musings Primavera Translation Uncategorized World events Meta Log in Entries RSS Comments RSS WordPress org Translation musings knock on wood Do you ever knock on wood You say something stupid like oh it s always sunny on my birthday then hurriedly search for a plank to touch in case you jinx it It is a custom known across the Western world and is generally used to avoid tempting fate But different countries have slightly different customs In Hungary well at least where Anikó lives you need to touch the bottom of the wood so the underside of a table will do nicely Here in the UK I think any old bit of wood will do and many people myself included will tap on their own heads if there is nothing else around In Italy they touch iron tocco ferro particularly if seeing something related to death In Bulgaria чукам на дърво is used as protection against evil but tables aren t allowed As here knocking on one s head however seems to be okay often followed by the tugging of an earlobe It s not altogether clear where this custom comes from but seems to go back to times when the spirits dwelt all over the place and often in the trees It

    Original URL path: http://www.firstedit.co.uk/blog/2014/04/translation-musings-knock-on-wood/ (2016-02-09)
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  • Translation Musings: Spring into spring! | First Edition Translations
    September 2013 August 2013 July 2013 June 2013 May 2013 April 2013 March 2013 February 2013 January 2013 December 2012 November 2012 October 2012 September 2012 August 2012 July 2012 June 2012 May 2012 April 2012 March 2012 February 2012 January 2012 December 2011 November 2011 October 2011 September 2011 August 2011 July 2011 June 2011 Categories Advent Calendar Business Case studies Export First Edition Translations Language Literature Miscellaneous Musings Primavera Translation Uncategorized World events Meta Log in Entries RSS Comments RSS WordPress org Translation Musings Spring into spring Google the font of all knowledge let s be honest have today announced the first day of Spring with a rather lovely little flower based doodle This meant some discussion in the office because a number of us thought it was tomorrow But Google and Wikipedia do confirm that the exact date of the Spring Equinox does vary due to the drifting of calendars and so on and can be anywhere between the 20th and the 25th of March So that s okay There are many cultural events and customs across the world associated with the March or Vernal Equinox here s the language bit from the Latin vernal meaning of or pertaining to spring and equinox meaning equal night Easter of course is coming along soon according to the Bible Jesus death and resurrection occurred around the time of the Jewish Passover which was celebrated on the first full moon following the vernal equinox In Japan both the March and September equinoxes are celebrated with a week of Buddhist services know as Higan or Higan e Meaning the other shore Higan refers to dead spirits who reach Nirvana after crossing the river of existence and celebrates the spiritual move from suffering to enlightenment Other celebrations include the Iranian New Year

    Original URL path: http://www.firstedit.co.uk/blog/2014/03/translation-musings-spring-into-spring/ (2016-02-09)
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