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  • Heritage Explorer - Images By Theme
    Barrow is a Neolithic chambered burial mound tomb It was built in around 3600 BC The mound is about 104 metres long 25 metres wide at the widest point and 3 2 metres at the highest point Inside it there is a 12 metre long central passage with five small chambers opening off it The chambers contained the bones of at least 36 people Many of the burials were incomplete

    Original URL path: http://www.heritage-explorer.co.uk/web/he/imagebythemedetail.aspx?crit=&ctid=121&id=11772 (2016-02-13)
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  • Heritage Explorer - Images By Theme
    s Coty House Aylesford Kent click here to return to images by theme Create Add to Student Gallery Add to My Favourites Kit s Coty House is the remains of a neolithic long barrow Long barrows were built during the early Neolithic period They were the burial places of the earliest farming communities in Britain and are among the oldest surviving prehistoric monuments These stones were originally buried at the eastern end of a long earthen mound of which only traces survive Long barrows appear to have been used for communal burial often with only parts of the human remains being selected for interment and it is probable that they acted as important ritual sites for local communities over a considerable period of time In the 1880s as concern mounted about damage to ancient monuments Kit s Coty House and Little Kit s Coty House were among the first to be protected by the state on the advice of General Augustus Henry Lane Fox Pitt Rivers the first Inspector of Ancient Monuments Railings were put around the stones to prevent vandalism This site is now in the care of English Heritage 2011 Find out more Copyright English Heritage Photo Library

    Original URL path: http://www.heritage-explorer.co.uk/web/he/imagebythemedetail.aspx?crit=&ctid=121&id=9832 (2016-02-13)
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  • Heritage Explorer - Images By Theme
    Knowlton Henge Woodlands Dorset click here to return to images by theme Create Add to Student Gallery Add to My Favourites A view of Knowlton Church and henge from the north The 12th century church stands within the earthworks of a prehistoric henge This site is now in the care of English Heritage 2010 Find out more Copyright Copyright Crown copyright NMR Reference nmr 4492 07 Location Dorset Woodlands Date

    Original URL path: http://www.heritage-explorer.co.uk/web/he/imagebythemedetail.aspx?crit=&ctid=121&id=1817 (2016-02-13)
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  • Heritage Explorer - Images By Theme
    Castlerigg Cumbria click here to return to images by theme Create Add to Student Gallery Add to My Favourites Castlerigg stone circle is possibly one of the earliest stone circles in the British Isles It may have been built c3000 BC There are 38 stones ranging in height from around 0 5m to over 2m originally there were 42 stones A wide gap at the exact north flanked by 2 tall stones probably indicates an entrance In the 1720s the antiquarian William Stukeley noted a second stone circle in the field immediately to the west However by the mid 19th century there was no trace of such a feature The only finds from within the circle are a stone club perhaps an axe rough out and a greenstone axe Both were referred to by Stukeley An excavation in 1882 only found a 1m deep pit with traces of charcoal near its base No pottery has been found to help date the circle However excavations of other stone circles would suggest it dates from the Middle Neolithic to the Middle Bronze Age c3000 1000 BC This site is now in the care of English Heritage 2010 Read detailed archaeological description Copyright

    Original URL path: http://www.heritage-explorer.co.uk/web/he/imagebythemedetail.aspx?crit=&ctid=121&id=9404 (2016-02-13)
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  • Heritage Explorer - Images By Theme
    PastScape NMR ViewFinder Stonehenge Wiltshire click here to return to images by theme Create Add to Student Gallery Add to My Favourites A general view of Stonehenge in the snow The henge is believed to have been built in circa 2 000 BC and undoubtedly had a religious or ceremonial significance This site is now in the care of English Heritage 2010 Copyright English Heritage Reference AA048233 Location Wiltshire Stonehenge

    Original URL path: http://www.heritage-explorer.co.uk/web/he/imagebythemedetail.aspx?crit=&ctid=121&id=11524 (2016-02-13)
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  • Heritage Explorer - Images By Theme
    is a few miles from Stonehenge and it is believed to be where the people who built Stonehenge lived It is made up of small squarish huts for people to live in and oval pens enclosures for animals to be kept in In the centre is Woodhenge The drawing is based on archaeological excavations Add to My Favourites English Heritage Neolithic New Stone Age Houses Stonehenge Wiltshire These two huts are reconstructions of Neolithic houses Their shape is based on excavations of Neolithic houses at Durrington Walls They are made from thin hazel rods woven around upright posts like a hazel hurdle fence The woven structure is then covered inside and out with a mixture of crushed chalk chopped straw and water This is called chalk daub Their roofs have been thatched with straw from wheat There are 5 houses in total outside the Visitor Centre at Stonehenge Each house has been thatched in a different way as although archaeology tells us about the walls there is no surviving evidence to prove exactly how the roofs would have looked Add to My Favourites English Heritage Interior of Reconstructed Neolithic New Stone Age House Stonehenge Wiltshire This photo shows the inside of one of the reconstructed Neolithic houses at Stonehenge In it you can see the central hearth or fireplace To the left is a bed made of two long pieces of split tree trunk with smaller branches laid across them like slats This is then covered with animal skins To the right is a set of wooden shelves used for storing objects such as pots knives axes wooded bowls pottery woven baskets and leather bags On the walls are an animal skin cloak a quiver of arrows and some pieces of fabric Add to My Favourites English Heritage Photo Library Windmill Hill Causewayed Enclosure Avebury Wiltshire Windmill Hill is a Neolithic causewayed enclosure It is part of a landscape that includes an early prehistoric field system and group of eight Early Bronze Age round barrows It is on a hill north west of Avebury Stone Circle It has 3 sets of banks and ditches The ditches are interrupted by causeways These are the gaps between each section of ditch Radio carbon dates tell us that the enclosure was in use from about 3000BC to around 2500BC The site was excavated by H G O Kendall in 1922 3 Alexander Keiller in 1925 9 I F Smith in 1957 and A Whittle in 1990 The finds uncovered included Neolithic flint artefacts such as arrowheads axe heads a sickle blade and scrapers Numerous animal bones and skulls as well as ceremonial chalk cups were also found A type of Neolithic pottery found on sites across Wessex was first identified here and has hence taken the name of the site Windmill Hill type pottery This site is now in the care of English Heritage 2010 Read detailed archaeological description Add to My Favourites English Heritage Photo Library West Kennet Long Barrow Avebury Wiltshire

    Original URL path: http://www.heritage-explorer.co.uk/web/he/imagebytheme.aspx?ctid=121&print=1 (2016-02-13)
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  • Heritage Explorer - Images By Theme
    tanged arrowheads on the top row a piercer on the left of the middle row side scrapers in the centre of the middle row a core on the right of the middle row edge trimmed knives on the left of the bottom row and thumbnail scrapers on the right of the bottom row Arrowheads were attached to wooden shafts to make arrows for hunting Piercers were used for making small

    Original URL path: http://www.heritage-explorer.co.uk/web/he/imagebythemedetail.aspx?crit=&ctid=122&id=11770 (2016-02-13)
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  • Heritage Explorer - Images By Theme
    as the Mesolithic and the New Stone Age known as the Neolithic The names all use the Latin for stone which is lithic and then palaeo means old meso means middle and neo means new The arrowheads on the top row date from the Early Neolithic and are often known as leaf shaped arrowheads Those on the middle row date from the Late Neolithic the time of Stonehenge The one

    Original URL path: http://www.heritage-explorer.co.uk/web/he/imagebythemedetail.aspx?crit=&ctid=122&id=11771 (2016-02-13)
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