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  • Heritage Explorer - Help
    Pages for this website are currently under construction However if you require any assistance in using this site please Contact Us and we will do our best to assist you

    Original URL path: http://www.heritage-explorer.co.uk/web/he/help.aspx?print=1 (2016-02-13)
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  • Heritage Explorer - Glossary
    side tower or projection from the main walls of a defensive work structure From it a garrison of soldiers could defend the ground in front or to the side Bastle Bastle Bastles A fortified house of two or three storeys The lower floor was used to house animals and the upper floor s were for living in The entrance was on the first floor Battlement Battlement Battlements Crenellation Crenellations A defensive wall built around the top of a castle with regular gaps for firing arrows or later guns through These are also called crenellations Beaux Arts Beaux Arts Another word for fine art It relates to a classical decorative style as was taught at the École des Beaux Arts in Paris Bede Bede A monk and saint known as the Venerable Bede c673 735AD He was also a scholar historian and theologian He wrote the first book on English history Ecclesiastical History of the English People It was written in Latin He was a monk at the Northumbrian monastery of Saint Peter at Monkwearmouth today in Sunderland and at its companion monastery Saint Paul s in modern Jarrow Both were in the Kingdom of Northumbria Belvedere Belvedere Belvederes A turret tower or look out in a prominent position to provide a view It can be either a separate building or the upper floor of a building Benedictine Benedictine Benedictines A religious group or person who follow the rules of St Benedict c480 547AD The three vows of poverty chastity and obedience were the basis of the rule of St Benedict St Benedict sought to draw a sharp line between the monastic life and that of the outside world Hence he required that as far as possible each monastery should form an independent self supporting community whose members never left the

    Original URL path: http://www.heritage-explorer.co.uk/web/he/glossary.aspx?letter=B (2016-02-13)
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  • Heritage Explorer - Glossary
    reform between 1838 and 1850 Its name comes from the People s Charter of 1838 This set out the movements 6 main aims They were a vote for every man over 21 a secret ballot to freely elect MPs payment for MPs so that they could be working class people not just the rich equal votes for each political constituency annual elections of MPs It was possibly the first working class labour movement in the world Choir Choir Quire The part of a church between the Nave and the Chancel where the choir sits Cholera Cholera A disease of the intestines that causes severe diarrhoea vomitting and stomach cramps It is caused by bacteria in water It often leads to death by dehydration In the summer of 1849 over 13 000 people in just three months died of cholera in London Since imrovments have been made to make drinking water cleaner cholera has almost disappeared in Europe Cistercian Cistercian Cistercians A Christian order of monks and nuns founded in 1098 They follow the rules of St Benedict obedience poverty and chastity in a very strict way They are often referred to as the White Monks because of the robes they wore As opposed to the Benedictines who wore black robes Citadel Citadel Citadels A citadel is a fortress for protecting a town sometimes incorporating a castle Classical Classical A type of architecture that is influenced by the architecture of ancient Greece or Rome Clerestory Clerestory Clerestories An architectural term denoting an upper level of a Romanesque or Gothic church the walls of which rise above the rooflines of the lower aisles and are pierced with windows The purpose of the clerestory is to give light to the inner space of a large building Cloister cloisters A cloister is an open space surrounded by covered walkways It comes from the Latin word claustrum which means enclosure They were an important feature of medieval monasteries Clothier Clothier Clothiers A person who makes sells or deals in clothes or cloth Cluniac Cluniac Cluniacs The Cluniac order is Benedictine in that its monks live according to the Rule of St Benedict The monks also wear black clothes and are known as Black Monks The order was formed after Cluny Abbey was founded in the 10th century The Cluniac way of life emphasizes the celebration of Mass and other services in the most elaborate manner possible The order is known for its splendor its richly decorated churches and its great wealth Cob Cob Cobb Cob or cobb is a building material consisting of clay sand straw water and earth similar to adobe Collegiate church Collegiate church A church served by a body of canons or prebendaries not housing the throne of a bishop and therefore not a cathedral served by secular canons rather than monks Colonnade Colonnade Colonnades Colonnaded A row of evenly spaced columns pillars Usually supporting a horizontal piece of stone or other material across the top of them Commemorate Commemorative Commemoration Commemorate

    Original URL path: http://www.heritage-explorer.co.uk/web/he/glossary.aspx?letter=C (2016-02-13)
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  • Heritage Explorer - Glossary
    past events by comparing the successive annual growth rings of trees It is usually used to date old timbers that are part of a house ship or other objects Dispensary Dispensary Dispensaries A place where medicine and medical supplies are dispensed Many dispensaries later grew to become hospitals Dissolution Dissolution The Dissolution was the legal process that took place between 1536 and 1541 by which Henry VIII disbanded monasteries nunneries and friaries in England Wales and Ireland Their income and property were taken by the king and in some cases given to other people Dominican Dominican Dominicans A Catholic religious order dedicated to Saint Dominic and founded in France in 1216 They are also known as the Black Friars because of the black cloak they wore over their white clothes habits They believed in learning teaching and charity to others They often carried and used Rosary Beads prayer beads Doric Doric The simplest and plainest of the three main classical orders of architcture Doric Ionic and Corinthian It is characterised by large undecorated columns Dormitory Dormitory Dormitories Dorter The communal sleeping area of a monastery It is also known as the dorter Dower Dower Part of a husband s property

    Original URL path: http://www.heritage-explorer.co.uk/web/he/glossary.aspx?letter=D (2016-02-13)
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  • Heritage Explorer - Glossary
    in it that is not connected to a sewer The toilet is usually a seat placed over a hole in the ground where the waste material is covered by soil ash or sawdust being thrown down it instead of flushing The waste or soil had to be dug out and taken away by night soil men Elizabethan Elizabethan Elizabethans Relating to the reign of Queen Elizabeth I 1558 1602 It

    Original URL path: http://www.heritage-explorer.co.uk/web/he/glossary.aspx?letter=E (2016-02-13)
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  • Heritage Explorer - Glossary
    to people or buildings Flax Flax The fibres of the flax plant can be made into thread This can then be woven into a type of fabric known as linen Fleur de lys Fleur de lys A pattern that looks like a lily with 3 distinct petals Florence Nightingale Florence Nightingale Florence Nightingale 1820 1910 was known as the Lady with the Lamp She was a nurse during the Crimean War She pioneered the concept of hygiene within hospitals She also set up the first training school for nurses at St Thomas s hospital Folly Folly Follies A building often found in 18th century landscape gardens They tend to be quirky and have no practical purpose They can take many forms ruins pretend castles towers hermits cells or grottoes Foreman Foreman Foremen An experienced person who supervises other workmen Forge Forge Forges Forged A place in which metal is worked by heating and hammering It is also known as a smithy Fortification Fortification Fortifications Fortify Fortified A usually permanent defense designed to strengthen and protect a place Fortlet fortlet fortlets A temporary Roman fort or camp As well as the permanent stone built forts near Hadrians Wall evidence of around 65 temporary camps or fortlets have been discoverd mainly from aerial photographs Some of these may have been used by the Roman soldiers who built the Wall Foundry Foundry Foundries Foundrymen A foundry is a factory that produces metal objects from castings Metals are cast into shapes by melting them into a liquid pouring the metal in a mould and then removing the mould material The most common metals processed are aluminum and cast iron Fox Talbot Fox Talbot William Henry Fox Talbot 1800 77 was a British physicist and a pioneer of photography Franciscan Franciscan Franciscans A religious group

    Original URL path: http://www.heritage-explorer.co.uk/web/he/glossary.aspx?letter=F (2016-02-13)
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  • Heritage Explorer - Glossary
    end of the reign of King George IV 1714 1836 It also refers to a style of architecture used in England at this time Georgian architecture is based on classical architecture It is characterized by proportion balance and symmetry with a regular pattern of windows and often centrally placed door Giles Gilbert Scott Giles Gilbert Scott Giles Gilbert Scott 1880 1960 was an architect who liked to mix traditional and modern styles He designed churches including Liverpool Anglican Cathedral industrial buildings such as Battersea and Bankside power stations in London and the red telephone kiosk Gothic Gothic A style of art and architecture usually associated with the Middle Ages 1150 1500 Many churches were built in the Gothic style The pointed arch is a common feature Granary Granary Granaries A storehouse for grain especially after it has been threshed or husked They were often raised off the ground to protect from damp and rats Grandmontine Grandmontine Grandmontines Grandmontines were the monks of the Order of Grandmont a religious order founded by Saint Stephen of Thiers towards the end of the 11th century They followed the Rule of St Stephen The early Grandmontines were noted for their extreme austerity They took vows of poverty and begging was only permitted when there was no food in the house The law of silence was also very severe as were the rules of fasting and abstinence Grange Grange Granges An outlying farm or estate usually belonging to a religious order or feudal lord Graving Dock Graving Dock Graving Docks Also known as a dry dock It is a large dock from which water can be pumped in and out It is used for building ships or for repairing a ship below its waterline Grotto Grotto Grottoes A shady cavern built as a garden feature

    Original URL path: http://www.heritage-explorer.co.uk/web/he/glossary.aspx?letter=G (2016-02-13)
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  • Heritage Explorer - Glossary
    the housing of aircraft Henge Henge henges A henge is a British prehistoric structure It is usually a ditch with a bank earth mound outside it The bank can have one two or four entrances cut through it Inside the bank there may be different features including timber circles stone circles standing stones pits burials and central mounds Hermit Hermit Hermits Somebody who lives a life of solitude for their

    Original URL path: http://www.heritage-explorer.co.uk/web/he/glossary.aspx?letter=H (2016-02-13)
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web-archive-uk.com, 2018-01-18