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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    original route starting at a signpost beside the hotel in Kirkmichael is up a sunken muddy track for 400 metres and then continues NE across open fields following faint paths that are waymarked to Ashintully Castle and past there towards two small lochs Beyond these descend E to cross the Ennoch Burn and climb over the south ridge of Lamh Dearg to reach Lair in Glen Shee OS Landranger 43 Braemar Blair Atholl Heritage Information This old route linking Kirkmichael with Glen Shee appears on various old maps including the OS 6 of the 1860s and was possibly before the B950 was constructed the main road between the two According to local information this track from Kirkmichael once led to the Market Muir behind the village The Old Statistical Account 1791 1799 refers to Kirkmichael s annual fair in the middle of the eighteenth century this was one of Scotland s principal cattle markets lasting for several days and sometimes a week It has also been reported that the village had for many years a weekly market for the local population and Kirkmichael was licensed as a burgh of barony in 1511 which would have given the landowner the right

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=53 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    forest on the left west and Scone Aerodrome on the right east Beyond the forest a short slightly vegetatious stretch leads over a burn and onto a well defined tractor track coming from the north This leads between cropped fields for a further kilometre all the way to St Martins joining a minor road at Bauchland NO154300 From the west side of the car park at St Martin s church a stony vehicular track leads NNE giving access to scattered houses along the route and to adjacent fields It is strongly defined and in good condition for an untarred track until after Kingswell when it becomes muddy and grassy It improves again on approaching the driveway of Dunsinnan House crosses the driveway and shortly becomes grassy and water logged for the final kilometre through forest to a cross roads of routes at NO179333 OS Landranger 53 Blairgowrie Forest of Alyth and 58 Perth Alloa Auchterarder Heritage Information This old road is depicted very clearly in John Adair s map of 1683 Maps tended to show only the very important roads in the 17th and 18th century so it must have been of great significance Indeed according to Adair it was the only route running north out of Perth on the east side of the Tay and as such would have seen a great deal of traffic Turnpike roads were the first attempt by the Government to make the road users pay for the upkeep of roads so they are characterised by having toll points Direct road taxation continued to be levied on motorists until 1937 when road tax was abolished Motorists now pay Vehicle Excise Duty which is arguably a pollution tax wear and tear on the roads has long been funded out of general revenue A Post House was

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=54 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    route follows field edges NNE and NNW to reach the Golland Bum at GR 050 042 Although this section of some 800m is virtually unmarked on the ground the first edition of the 1 50000 map 1976 does show it At the Golland Burn there is very clear evidence of a sunken cart road down to and beyond the burn then up the side of the next field joining a currently used rough tractor track at GR 048 044 This track is followed downhill east for some 400m to a T junction at GR 052 044 A grassy but very clear depression runs NE along the line of a dyke and leads conclusively to a barrel brig at GR 053 047 The next 300m NE along the burnside have recently been interrupted by two new fences having been clear for at least the past 25 years At the next modern track GR 054 050 the old line crosses over the track and ascends the gorse covered slope beyond the ruts of the old line can readily be followed and after short initial zig zags the route steadies to a NE line along fences rising steadily Another modern track is met at GR 058 053 where the true line possibly switches from the S to the N side of the fence line and continues steadily NE and rising Approaching the corner of the forest at GR 063 057 faint lines lead over the short grazing turf to a forest gate circa GR 064 059 A faint path can be discerned running just inside the forest fence still NE and rising At GR 066 062 a rough grassy earthy vehicular track is joined and this undulates onwards to join a more prominent stony forest road at GR 069 069 This leads gently

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=55 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    157 329 Geographical area Perth Kinross and Stirling part Path Type Rural Path Path distance 1 5km Accessibility info Suitable for pedestrians Back to Search Route Description This old path starts just south of Kingswell and runs north east to the corner of a plantation before turning directly north and entering Wolfhill from the south The original track was a lot straighter between St Martins and Wolfhill but it seems

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=56 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    to Search Route Description From the B958 at NO327290 the route describes a loop first north to Pilmore Farm then east and south to the western edge of the Scottish Crop Research Institute s ground From there a rough stony tractor track leads east to a cross roads of similar tracks at NO338298 marked by a new sign From one field before the Institute s buildings broad tarred roads lead through and past the buildings At the crossroads at NO343299 there are new signs and the pedestrian access lane to the Institute runs east to Errol Road New Society sign NO346300 and from there to the route s eastern terminus at a minor road beside the old cemetery at NO350301 This part of the route falls into three distinct sections i a short cut through from a gap in the wall at the side of Errol Road into an area of housing immediately beyond the wall ii a street running through these houses and parallel to the north edge of a small area of parkland and iii a pedestrian width path leading beside a burn to a minor street at the old cemetery near the eastern end of the village

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=57 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    paths going off of the main path to the housing estates Just keep going straight under a road bridge and an old bridge until you come to a crossroad If you went straight on you would arrive at Wellhall Rd NS693546 Instead take the left turn at the crossroads Pass another bridge on your left The path starts to narrow go uphill with a few steps and turn right onto Dalmellington Court The route is easy going It has been known for Roe deer and woodpeckers to be seen and heard Rabbits have also been seen early in the morning The miners may have been making their way to the Udston pit A housing estate now sits on the site To get there leave Dalmellington Court turn left onto Davington Drive then straight onto the main road Turn right After 200m at the bend in the road go through the gate with an emergency vehicle only sign Through the roundabout after the 2nd road on the right there s a small path which takes you past where the old bing used to be OS Landranger 64 Glasgow Heritage Information Locally this is said to have been a miners path but it is not certain where the miners were coming from and what mine they were going to Any further information would be very gratefully received The first section of the path follows a disused railway line that ran from Strathaven to Stonefield At one time there was a station at Meikle Earnock and the line also served the collieries On the 3rd edition 1 OS map 1905 a siding is shown to a colliery located just south of where the bridge crosses the disused railway line at Townhill Road Udston Colliery was developed after 1872 by James Dunn farmer at

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=58 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    Strathclyde and Lanarkshire Path Type Rural Path Path distance 2 5km Accessibility info Suitable for pedestrians Back to Search Route Description Initially there is a good tarmac surface as far as Blackhouse Farm Formerly the usual route was between a hayshed on the left and the farmhouse to a gate in a fence The way is now to the left of the buildings over a lawn and then over a stile From here the path is to the right of a stone wall and is very rough and wet in places A further stile replaces an old gate At North Moorhouse the route is very muddy the ground having been trampled by cows Thereafter the route is a hard bottomed farm road OS Landranger 64 Glasgow Heritage Information This route is said to have been a school path and can be seen clearly on the OS 1 popular edition map published in 1925 it also can be followed on the OS 6 first edition surveyed in 1856 On both these maps a school can be seen marked at the southwest corner of the the junction with the A77 T north of Loganswell Farm and it is likely that this was

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=59 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    Craigton Bleach House to work Bleach works were fields where cloth was spread out to be bleached by the sun or by water after having been treated with alkali and acid agents This is a process that took months and large areas of land until the invention of dry bleaching powder which reduced the time taken to bleach cloth and the need for bleach fields This process was developed in the early 19th century and so the path would not have been used for this purpose for much longer Ian R Mitchell s Walking Through Scotland s History gives a lot of detail about the later use of this route After the First World War Barns Graham a landowner at Carbeth north of Milngavie allowed an ex serviceman to build a holiday shack Other huts followed the hutters paying a nominal rent facilities were primitive and installed at the residents own expense Soon the place became a veritable holiday camp and a burn was dammed to make an outdoor swimming pool in this co operative version of a Butlins Most of the hutters came from the west side of the Glasgow conurbation from places like Scotstoun and Yoker but especially from Clydebank just outside the city boundary And many of the hutters walked to Carbeth there to spend the weekends or their summer holidays Although the suburban railway went to Milngavie this was a time consuming and expensive route for the Clydebankers so most simply walked over the Kilpatrick Hills to Carbeth An old right of way went from the Kilpatricks to Craigton on the Drymen road and thence they walked by Craigallian Loch see more below to Carbeth Some still walk even today from Clydebank to Carbeth When Clydebank was devastated by German bombs during the Second World War

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=60 (2016-02-09)
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