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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    Back to Search Route Description The Greenock Cut is a former aqueduct with embankment serving as a walkway It follows the contours of the hillside mainly overlooking the town and the magnificent scenery of the Firth of Clyde and beyond to the Argyll hills and the Arrochar Alps It is best walked upstream to enjoy the scenery and can be combined with an adjoining path to form a circular walk of 11 5km There are toilets café picnic facilities at the Greenock Cut Visitor Centre at Cornalees Bridge The surface is basically grass grown hardcore wide enough for two to walk abreast Recently there has been cutting of gorse rebuilding of revetments and laying of fine gravel to a width of 1m for most of its length This work continues From the steep Overton Road car park a fine gravel ramp leads up to the aqueduct The embankment eastwards can be followed here via a metal kissing gate At Cornalees Bridge over the unclassified road a gap in the wall has the usual fine gravel leading towards the aqueduct but a notice indicates the pathway is under construction and entry is via a gate 15m southwards Here a pedestrian tubular metal gate warns of restoration work in progress From here flag steps lead down the embankment and it is obvious a former bridge linking to the other side of the rather wider than otherwise aqueduct is now missing No indication as to whether it will be replaced There has been a lot of work done on the Greenock Cut recently It is reportedly now accessible to wheelchairs mobility scooters are available to hire free from the visitor centre if booked ahead OS Landranger 63 Firth of Clyde area Heritage Information The Greenock Cut is an aqueduct built between 1825 and

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=61 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    373817 where there is another wooden signpost FP to Cardross 6 5km A pleasant green stony path leads uphill to a plantation Darleith Muir The track continues through the plantation and on down through rough pasture to Blackthird Farm Parts of this section of the track are very muddy after wet weather due to cattle including feeding stations and farm vehicles Bulls with cattle have been encountered on the track either side of Darleith Muir From here a metalled road is followed to Auchensail Kirkton and thence on to Cardross The Stoneymollan Road is used in part by Scotland s newest long distance route officially launched in April 2014 the John Muir Way runs from Helensburgh to Dunbar Weaving its way through lowland Scotland this 215km trail also takes in parts of the G owk Stane Road the Strathkelvin Railway Path the Forth Clyde Canal the Antonine Wall and the Union Canal OS Landranger 63 Firth of Clyde area Heritage Information This is an old coffin road that people would have used to carry their dead to be buried in the consecrated ground of the church at Cardross At nearly 7km long it is quite a distance to carry a

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=62 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    Edinburgh from the Falkirk Wheel by following the Union Canal towpath OS Landranger 64 Glasgow Heritage Information The Forth and Clyde Canal was built between 1768 and 1790 and was designed by engineer John Smeaton It runs for 35 miles from Bowling basin to Grangemouth and as its name suggests it linked the Forth and the Clyde in order to provide for sea going vessels an alternative to the long and dangerous journey around the north of Scotland Bear in mind that another valuable shortcut the Caledonian Canal didn t open until 1822 Even so although an east west cross country canal had been long mooted work stalled for a number of years due to a lack of funds Construction restarted when money was made available from forfeited Jacobite estates and this enabled completion of the canal to Bowling To cater for the size of the traffic it was intended to carry the canal s 39 locks are 60ft long and 20ft wide The highest section of the canal lies between Maryhill and the Wyndford locks at Banknock and is 156ft above sea level To serve Glasgow a branch ran to Port Dundas This canal was a vital arterial route and not just for the purposes of trade Passenger boats could travel the 24 miles between Glasgow and Camelon in five and a half hours and an intercity link to Edinburgh was later created by the opening of the Union Canal in 1822 The canal is fed along its length by various reservoirs East of Kilsyth Banton Loch collects water from the surrounding hills and keeps the canal topped up A visit to the loch makes for an interesting diversion from the canal to reach it follow the Avenue Before the advent of steam power the traffic along the canal

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=63 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    pedestrians Back to Search Route Description This route runs along the south side of the railway from Croy Station to the next public road to the west a kilometre away at the railway viaduct south of Drumglass A sign posted tarred path leads away from the B802 between the upper and lower station car parks it shortly gives way to an unmade grassy path sufficiently trodden to be clearly apparent This runs parallel to the railway embankment rising and falling with the lie of the land and with open fields to the south At the halfway point NS 726 753 a prominent cart road approaches the railway from the south and turns west parallel to the railway For the next 200m this cart road forms a clear shelf at the side of the field before descending to a low lying area which is wet and much poached by cattle trampling this section is defined by a line of hawthorn on its south side The final few metres to the public road are interrupted by a new looking fence line easily ducked through or climbed another DIY slip through beside the field gate leads onto a plank bridge and so to the public road just alongside the viaduct OS Landranger 64 Glasgow Heritage Information The Corduroy Path gets its name from the clothing issued by the railway company to their staff As durable a substance as was available at the time has turned into an enduring name for a local path The path was created in the 1840s when the railway line opened and was used extensively when the old Edinburgh Glasgow railway cottages known locally as Corduroy Row were lived in The railway workers used this path to access the junction at the eastern end The cottages have since been

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=64 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    Antonine Wall where there is a Historic Scotland explanatory plaque Follow the landrover track which continues uphill for a short distance The route levels off near Westerwood where there is another gate which opens easily After Westerwood another route goes south to Cumbernauld from here the path deteriorates and crosses the Wall ditch to a gate at NS764774 After this path the route has can be difficult underfoot due to trampling by cattle and poor drainage There is an obvious way between what were Hawthorn hedges now overgrown but conditions underfoot have required others to deviate round them The Wall ditch is now to the north and drainage problems persist until a gate reportedly very difficult to open is reached NS769776 At this point the Wall ditch is re crossed and a Historic Scotland plaque describes the Antonine Wall The route continues through woodland on the south side of the Wall At NS770777 the right of way turns north and then east to reach Wyndford Road Our surveyor continued along the line of the Wall crossing the first of three fences the first and last have step over stiles the middle two do not The route reaches a field margin where a Historic Scotland sign has been removed Access to Wyndford Road is by a difficult to open gate 3 5km Cameron Black has recently published his book An Antonine Trail which includes mapping by Heritage Paths favourite cartographer David Langworth It s recommended reading if you d like to follow the line of the Antonine Wall and for a short while is available via ScotWays Cameron has generously offered to donate 3 for each copy the ScotWays office sells directly so buying the book benefits Heritage Paths too Please contact the ScotWays office for more details OS Landranger 64

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=65 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    pedestrians Suitable for Bikes Back to Search Route Description The Bogie Line path starts at Croy Station and follows the south side of the railway line in an easterly direction After about 1 5km either continue straight ahead to reach the Wester Dullatur railway bridge which enables access to Croy Hill or turn right to follow a path around the top of an old quarry into Dullatur village The route

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=66 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    Back to Search Route Description The Heritage Paths project has received reports that the section of the route between Myres Hill and High Overmuir is unclear in part because of the windfarm infrastructure en route We are in touch with the Councils access teams and it is our understanding that it is intended that the route be improved and sign posted However landowner negotiations and forestry operations can result in a time consuming process Nevertheless it remains our hope that work will commence on the Trail this year In the meantime we would be very grateful for a survey from anyone who walks the route East Renfrewshire Council s map of Whitelee Windfarm may assist with route planning OS Landranger 64 Glasgow 71 Lanark Upper Nithsdale Heritage Information The Irvine Valley towns of Darvel and Newmilns were until recently world famous in the manufacture of lace products Darvel s last lace factory closed as recently as 2008 while there are still two factories operating in Newmilns Before the factory system was introduced with the advent of the power loom in 1872 lace was produced on handlooms in hundreds of cottages in the Valley The handloom weavers in the days of

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=67 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    approaching Ewe Hill runs along a shelf and is very clear indeed The forest noted on the Landranger OS map has been recently felled c 2011 and replaced by an extensive windfarm There is now a wide hardcore track which follows the ridge to Hardrig Head and over the Deil s Barn Door Our surveyor requires a return visit to try to ascertain the relationship of the old track to the more recent introductions as the weather was atrocious last time around The onward route to the area between Pinnacle and The Seat is as yet unsurveyed It too is likely to have been affected by the Clyde Windfarm but we would welcome information as to the current condition of this most southerly section of the old route OS Landranger 72 Upper Clyde Valley Heritage Information This path is marked on some of the old Ordnance Survey maps as Peat Road and then later as Old Peat Track The path must have been very important to the locals to be named in maps It is a very long path to be walking to cut and then carry peat back Peat cutting is often seen as specifically a Highlands Islands activity so it is interesting to see evidence that peat cutting was important to other parts of Scotland However the Old Statistical Account 1791 99 for Lamington parish reported that The fuel is mostly coal there being little use made of peat here except in the drying of corn and for the kiln and making of malt And although the New Statistical Account 1834 45 reports that The minister has a right to peat fuel turf and divot which i exercise as often as i have occasion to use all or either of them it goes on to state that Peats

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=68 (2016-02-09)
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web-archive-uk.com, 2017-12-13