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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    Steallair Dubh with the former public road between Balimore and Ellary Continuing in a north easterly direction from the seat the route ascends for about a mile to the Ellary Burn before reaching a height of about 170 metres Thereafter a wooded section of about 1 25 miles which passes several waterfalls the Steallair Dubh black cataract leads to a point at grid reference NR 761 777 where a track from Cove and St Columba s Cave is faintly discernible The track descends for a further 0 75 miles to the present road turning on itself to join the road in a south westerly direction This section is marked by two birch trees which have fallen onto the track but at both places the route is passable At the junction with the present road a ruined building is located within the surrounding woodland The surface of this route is bare and green in part and invariably wet OS Landranger 62 North Kintyre area Heritage Information This route is said to be an ancient track and certainly resembles one as it sticks to the high ground It is punctuated by embankments bridging and quarry holes evidence of the road s former

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=116 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    track that goes all the way to the top of Bennachie It is a surfaced track consisting mainly of gravel and rocks The Maiden Causeway largely follows the line of this route until well up the hill OS Landranger 38 Aberdeen surrounding area Heritage Information Maiden Causeway is a track averaging 3 5m wide reduced in places to a hollow way Only for a length of about 60m immediately outside the entrance to the fort is there any definite sign of paving Elsewhere this effect is created by the striated rock strata where the track has been weathered to bed rock There is nothing to date it by but several other tracks branch from it and it appears to be one of the main access roads to the Bennachie range and as such could be at least medieval if not an original route to the fort The Maiden Causeway is said to have run to Maiden Castle One branch seemingly the principal one leaves the camp on the west side another not quite so perfect leaves it on the east and both meet at the foot of a small rock called the Nether Maiden NJ 682 224 From this the road can be traced for a short distance when it disappears or nearly so It can again be distinctly traced where it crossed the head of Rushmill Burn NJ 680 229 and from thence is very perfect until it joins the present road up the hill From where it leaves this road at the top of Stay Knowe NJ 685 235 and at this place is the most perfect portion it is traceable to the woods of Pittodrie This prehistoric footpath leading up to the hillfort on the Mither Tap of Bennachie has an interesting story to its name A

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=118 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    for about 3 5km On leaving the forest the track is quite clear curving round the base of Hare Hill to join a forest road below Little Kerloch Leave it at about NO683868 by a path heading south east along a forest ride towards the Builg Burn Continue over rough ground to the col between Tipperweir and Kerloch where an old track leads into the forest This is followed south east then west for a short distance then south east again along the West Burn of Builg From the junction of the East and West Burns of Builg continue the descent south east to Corsebauld and Chapelton Farm from where a farm road going south west leads to the Stonehaven road Mains of Glenfarquhar and Auchenblae OS Landranger 45 Stonehaven Banchory Heritage Information This is an ancient right of way from Strachan in Feughside to Paldy Fair near Glenfarquhar Lodge 3km north of Auchenblae It was probably used principally as a drove road for drovers heading to Laurencekirk market It did not go quite as high as the nearby Cairn a Mounth road and so would have been snowbound less often It was also probably fairly busy with drovers and

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=119 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    at the end of the vehicle road at Raitshill Ahead is a good hard surfaced grassy road 8 10 ft wide which goes straight on to Tarves Tolquhon Castle can be seen after a while on the right As the track goes up a gentle slope a track appears on the right whih is signposted for Tolquhon The way continues as a sound grassy track with a hard foundation A wood is passed through after which the road goes downhill towards Tarves As one enters the outskirts there is a sign saying Old Aberdeen Road The road now becomes a good metalled road which leads up to the square at Tarves coming out by the Aberdeen Arms Head out of Tarves along Tree Road a minor surfaced road which leaves between houses on the north side of the square It is bounded by houses with gardens as far as the football park on the left in 0 4Km The route then quickly deteriorates to a farm track which continues ahead and is signed OrdhiU The side track to Ordhill leaves on the right in a farther 0 4Km The undulating track continues northwards and then descends to end at an unclassified road which runs east from the B999 Immediately opposite there is a tarmac road with a partly obliterated sign which reads Private Road to Mains of Haddo Estate Office OS Landranger sheet 30 Fraserburgh Peterhead District and sheet 38 Aberdeen surrounding area Heritage Information The Old Aberdeen Road was probably an important route into Aberdeen but is better known as having been a drove road The section signed Old Aberdeen Road is a grassy farm track bounded by overgrown stone dykes running across low lying farmland At GPS NJ869 306 the route crosses a small burn on a stone

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=120 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    to the ScotWays sign above Glenskinnan An older track goes from there to the entry to forest SW of Shillofad A clear footpath goes through forest to emerge on good forest road on descent to Sheeoch Burn The footpath is clear from there to the ScotWays sign at Cowie Burn junction From there to S end of route is on good forest and farm roads Some of the tracks on S side may be suitable for less able users as they are forest roads but there is a locked gate which may be a problem The track on N side has 2 gates which have side gates for pedestrians A further 2 gates are locked with no side gates requiring either the gates or an adjacent fence to be climbed Many of the footpaths in the middle would not be suitable other than for ambulant users or cyclists There is also the ford of Sheeoch Burn which although it is not wide 0 5m or deep 30cm it has no bridge nor any stepping stones At the locked gate on the S side there is access around the gate as no fence links with it but both sides are choked with broom and gorse 1 1 5m high making access somewhat difficult OS Landranger 45 Stonehaven Banchory Heritage Information The Stock Mounth was also known as The Foggy Road among locals in Durris This is for the same reason as some are called green roads or velvet roads as the path is overgrown with turf and moss and so is soft It was probably used mainly as a drove road by drovers avoiding the toll at the Bridge of Dye on the better known Cairn a Mounth road of course the other way travellers avoided this toll was to ford

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=121 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    of south it crosses two modern forest tracks and eventually emerges at the edge of the forest at an old gate at NO810921 An open grassy section of some 300m leads down to join a modem landrover track at NO813917 the route then going south over a spur to Easter Auquhollie and from there southeast past Nether Auquhollie to join the Slug Road A957 at Mowtie 5km from Stonehaven OS Landranger 45 Stonehaven Banchory Heritage Information This road dates from at least the Roman period although it could well be older than that The route would have been an access road between Stonehaven and the north side of the Dee Other nearby old routes are the Causey Mounth which would occassionally have been covered with coastal haar and the much higher Cairn a Mounth which would have been difficult to cross for much of the year Therefore it seems that the Elsick Mounth must have seen a lot of travel and as Raedykes and Normandykes Roman Forts are located at each end it is likely that this was either a pre Roman route that the Romans exploited or a road built by the Romans Sir James Balfour of Denmilne 1600 1651 prepared a list of Mounth passes which appeared in the Spalding Club Collections on the Shires of Aberdeen and Banff printed in 1843 He describes the Elsick Mounth as going from Stonehaven to Drum This route by Auquhollie is the only route from Stonehaven to Deeside shown on Garden s map of Kincardine in 1776 One branch by Denside went to the old ford on the River Dee at Tilbouries 1km south of Drum It is also shown on Roy s map of 1755 so it was clearly still in heavy use in the 18th century A fascinating standing

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=122 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    A97 near Logie Coldstone We don t yet have a full survey but a lot of work has been done on the route recently so it should be signposted and very accessible OS Landranger 37 Strathdon Alford Heritage Information The granite lined mineral springs of Poldhu Wells were believed to have curative properties so were once a popular attraction The wells are mentioned in the First Statistical Account of Scotland

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=123 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    of Auchinhove near Lumphanan NJ 557 035 Geographical area Grampian Path Type Rural Path Path distance 1 3km Accessibility info Suitable for pedestrians Suitable for horses Back to Search Route Description From the cross roads at the old schoolhouse NJ570037 a rough gravel track leads westwards and gives access to a few houses After the last house a swathe the width of a road but extremely vegetatious leads on in the same direction and can be seen stretching all the way to Marywell a kilometre ahead The vegetation can be trodden down though much of it is chest high fortunately few of the plants are thorny The first 400m or so leads downhill and the vegetation eases after the burn at the foot of the dip The western half of the route is along faint wheel tracks lightly grass grown and easier to walk Approaching the first houses at Marywell there is an openable gate the track progressively strengthens and eventually becomes a narrow tarred road before reaching the public road at the T junction at NJ560036 OS Landranger 37 Strathdon Alford Heritage Information Known locally as The Comply the origin of this name is so far unknown It was

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=124 (2016-02-09)
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web-archive-uk.com, 2017-12-17