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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    until it joins a main track onto which a right turn is made at a sign This is followed with signs until a left turn at another sign to cross the Cowie Burn on a concrete bridge The road rises and passes the Lady Leys ruin continuing uphill with disc signs until the Forestry Commission sign is reached Follow the right hand track to the car park at Quithel OS Landranger 45 Stonehaven Banchory Heritage Information This old path over the Mounth has been used for many centuries as an alternative crossing of the Mounth to the nearby Slug Road It said to have been used by Edward I in 1296 and also William Wallace Long after the Wars of Independence it was by the Cryne Corse Mounth that the Marquis of Montrose reached Aberdeen in September 1644 following his victory against another Covenanter force at the Battle of Tippermuir The Cryne Corse Mounth was used by drovers to get to St Palladius Fair Paldy Fair on Herscha Hill north of Auchenblae by Fordoun According to ARB Haldane s The Drove Roads of Scotland it was a tryst of some importance In 1795 it was said that up to 3000 cattle were sold at this Fordoun cattle fair each July and that most of them had come from the north The site of Paldy Fair can be seen clearly marked on Ordnance Survey 6 second edition mappping 1892 1905 and also on the OS 1 mapping until at least the 1950s Cryne Corse is also known as Cryne Cross although the origin of either name is not known In Grampian Ways Robert Smith gives a number of theories such as that the pass may have been named after a local Aberdeen Family called Cryne The route passes Red Beard s

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=125 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    by Bridge o Ess From Braeloine Bridge go upstream to Knockie Bridge then up past Knockie Viewpoint In about 2km cross the Burn of Skinna and climb the ridge between it and the Water of Allachy to Craigmahandle 574m After a slight drop the path rises again to St Colm s Well and goes just west of the summit of Gannoch 731m and south over Tampie 723m 1 5km further south the path is joined by the Fungle Road and descends by Shinfur and the Water of Tarf to Tarfside village in Glen Esk OS Landranger 44 Ballater Glen Clova Heritage Information This old road is generally known as an old drove road and was certainly used a great deal for taking cattle probably for the nearest big cattle market in Laurencekirk but also to the big Tryst at Crieff and then later at Falkirk It is worth noting that the road has been in existence for a lot longer than the droving trade though Curiously there is a carved stone on the route near Belrorie noting that Edward I and the Marquis of Montrose crossed via the Firmounth in 1296 and 1303 and in 1645 respectively This stone was commissioned by Sir William Cunliffe Brooks who bought the Glen Tanar estate in the mid 19th century Most historians regard this statement to be inaccurate in that Edward I never travelled along the Firmounth and Montrose was very unlikely to have done so either This road was used in the 19th century by itinerant agricultural workers who came from the North East to work the harvest in the Lothians and Strathmore Women were the preferred labour source for some time and large groups of women numbering 30 50 would descend from the Highland and live communally in bothies while they

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=126 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    Description From the bridge over the River Dee go south up The Fungle by a steep road between Birsemore Hill and Craigendinnie to a cottage The Guard From there a track continues through woodland and across the Allt Dinnie to join a track which goes south over the col south west of Carnferg to Birse Castle Leave this track before reaching the castle and turn south at a Scottish Rights of Way SRWS signpost to follow a path to another SRWS signpost at NO521900 From there the route continues SSW up a path on the west side of the stream to the col between Mudlee Bracks and Tampie 800 metres beyond the col the path joins the Firmounth and descends by Shinfur and the Water of Tarf to Tarfside village in Glen Esk OS Landranger 44 Ballater Glen Clova Heritage Information Sir James Balfour of Denmilne 1600 1651 prepared a list of Mounth passes which is printed in the Spalding Club Collections on the Shires of Aberdeen and Banff printed in 1843 He calls this route the Forest of Birse Mounth from Cairn Corse to Birse on Deeside Cairncross is at Tarfside The route is shown on Roy s map

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=127 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    Routes Heritage Paths The Old String Road Start location Access road to Monyquil from B880 NR 938 348 End location B880 3km west of Brodick NR 977 358 Geographical area Arran and Ayrshire Path Type Civil Road Path distance 4 5km Accessibility info Suitable for pedestrians Back to Search Route Description Easily seen from the B880 String road as it cuts through the bracken on the opposite slope of Gleann an t Suidhe The path leaves the north side of the road very close to the summit heading WSW down the glen above the right or north bank of the burn The path is grassy and easily followed for most of the way on a generally downward slope but contouring the hillside rather pleasantly before descending a spur into Gleann Easbuig below Cnoc a Chlochair Fort to reach another burn close to a ruined building The burn is crossed and the route runs parallel to but still on the right or north bank of the Machrie Water for about 900m to the site of the Monyquil Standing Stone and chambered Tomb Thereafter the route is traversing arable land and it is necessary to ford the Allt Mhic Gillegregish to gain

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=128 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    Bealach Eorabhat South Harris Site Design Hosting by Digital Routes Heritage Paths The Wrack Road Start location A719 Craig Tara Holiday Park NS 301 179 End location Beach east side of Heads of Ayr NS 298 186 Geographical area Arran and Ayrshire Path Type Rural Path Path distance 0 8km Accessibility info Suitable for pedestrians Back to Search Route Description The route starts at the top car park to Craig Tara Holiday Park and follows the outside of the holiday park boundary fence It then crosses the old railway line and then runs inside the holiday park boundary fence after crossing a stile Towards the foreshore the route passes through a large gate which is often closed but which must remain unlocked as it is used by West of Scotland Water for access to sewage works OS Landranger sheet 70 Ayr Kilmarnock Troon Heritage Information A Wrack Road is a trak that was used by people collecting seaweed by the coast and taking them inland to be spread on the fields to act as fertiliser For some reason this was a particularly popular practice along the Ayrshire coast and was supposed to be a very effective way of fertilising fields

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=129 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    Ayrshire Path Type Civil Road Drove Road Path distance 18 8km Accessibility info Suitable for pedestrians Back to Search Route Description Today much of this route goes through developed forests so we would welcome an updated description We are informed that part of the route is to be used by the Carrick Way so their waymarkers and posts may help with route finding OS Landranger 76 Girvan surrounding area and

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=130 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    West Loch Tarbert NR 759 580 End location Quinhill NR 765 566 Geographical area Argyll and Bute Path Type Rural Path Path distance 1 6km Accessibility info Suitable for pedestrians Back to Search Route Description We have no survey of this route yet and would be very grateful to receive one OS Landranger sheet 62 North Kintyre area Heritage Information A ferry used to cross West Loch Tarbert from the

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=131 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    Geographical area Argyll and Bute Path Type Rural Path Path distance 7km Accessibility info Suitable for pedestrians Back to Search Route Description From the telephone box at the end of the public road the original route goes at first beside the loch However this line is reportedly overgrown and wet so it may be preferable to take the estate road past the lodge and then turn left to reach and follow the shore road The route continues higher up on the hillside above the loch through attractive oak and birch woods where pleasant stretches of grassy path alternate with some very wet and boggy sections Waymarkers show the route at several points A fingerpost marks the north end of the right of way on the B836 The path is not always clear and at some points can be overgrown with bracken so careful navigation is required to avoid getting lost Explore Cowal walked this old route south to north and back again in February 2015 then helpfully blogged about the experience it s a great read with an interactive map and loads of photos OS Landranger 56 Loch Lomond Inveraray area and 63 Firth of Clyde area Heritage Information This

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=132 (2016-02-09)
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web-archive-uk.com, 2017-12-18