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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    South Harris Site Design Hosting by Digital Routes Heritage Paths Knapdale Drove Road Start location Kilmichael of Inverlussa Church NR 774 858 End location B841 at Daill NR 826 907 Geographical area Argyll and Bute Path Type Drove Road Path distance 7 5km Accessibility info Suitable for pedestrians Back to Search Route Description By track north east from Kilmichael of Inverlussa church via Barnagad by west side of Loch an

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=133 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    road passes above Corrymuckloch and goes directly to Amulree where fortunately for walkers and cyclists vehicular traffic now uses a new bridge bypassing the narrow Wade Bridge From Amulree Wade s Road continues north cutting the corner of the A826 by climbing over the hillside across Glen Fender and into Glen Cochill After crossing and recrossing the A826 the Old Military Road keeps straight up the west bank of the Cochill Burn for over 3km passing a little Wade bridge opposite Scotston The straight section continuing across the moorland after passing Scotston is on rather boggy ground and eventually is lost in forestry plantations about 800m south of Loch na Craige where the modern road is rejoined The Wade Road passes the loch 100m to its east On the descent towards Aberfeldy the Wade Road goes arrow straight down through trees towards Gatehouse where the two roads coincide They part for the final time at NN870485 and the old road goes straight to the heart of Aberfeldy down the old Crieff Road directly to The Square OS Landranger 52 Pitlochry and Aberfeldy or 58 Perth Alloa Auchterarder Heritage Information From 1730 one of the earliest military roads built under the auspices of General Wade linked Crieff with Dalnacardoch a distance of 44 miles Here the focus is solely on the part between Crieff and Aberfeldy as the remainder of the route north to Dalnacardoch remains almost entirely in use by the modern road network Frustratingly for General Wade there was delay in completion of Aberfeldy s Tay Bridge and it was not officially opened until 1735 JB Salmond sets the opening scene of his book Wade In Scotland 1934 on this stretch of military road with the General travelling to the great bridge s opening ceremony The first section of

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=134 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    just west of Kingisland turning more northerly and passing Kilmaveonaig before turning again to head straight for the Old Bridge of Tilt West of the bridge it follows an unclassified road for a bit before forking left along an estate road to pass St Bride s Church and then turn more southerly after Diana s Grove before going through a plantation and joining the B8079 before Woodend Any recent surveys would be very welcome OS Landranger 43 Braemar Blair Atholl Heritage Information This is a small section of the military road built between 1728 and 1730 under the orders of General Wade to link Dunkeld and Inverness 102 miles long this road was seen as critically important as there was a good quality road to Inver near Dunkeld but little going north from there This road then would have become an artery for soldiers patrolling the highlands Further sections of this lengthy Military Road which are described on this website are the stretch south west of Ruthven Barracks that via the Slochd and the Old Edinburgh Road from Moy to Inverness Both Kilmaveonaig and St Bride s Church which the road passes were built in the 16th century although Kilmaveonaig

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=135 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    for pedestrians Suitable for Bikes Suitable for horses Back to Search Route Description Our route survey is incomplete so if you walk any of it please do let us know what you find The following should be enough to get you started though This route runs to the north of Stormont Loch from the A923 to a track junction in the woods south of the two Rosemount golf courses thence on westwards to the A93 The eastern end is at first a rough gravel approach to a dwelling then a grassy muddy tractor track which ends at a gate NO 190 425 Beyond the gate a pedestrian width grassy path skirts the edge of a wood for some 400m and reaches a cross roads of tracks at NO 185 424 Remainder of route not surveyed on this occasion but thought to be clear No difficulties no signs OS Landranger 53 Blairgowrie Forest of Alyth Heritage Information This path is part of the military road built in the 1760s by Major Caulfeild It was built to link Coupar Angus to Dunkeld where a road had previously been built to connect Dunkeld to Amulree The completion of this road was the first

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=136 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    at the end of the left branch of the road There is an information board for the reserve and the track is clear Beyond the Burn of Winnaswarta Dale the way divides follow the posts up the slope and across the heather moorland to the top of Hermaness Hill The route is very boggy and the use of boots is strongly recommended However duckboards have been put in place over some of the worst sections 6km there and back A circular walk of about 9km can be made by continuing up the Burn of Winnaswarta Dale to the coast and following the marker posts along the cliffs north then up onto Hermaness Hill OS Landranger 1 Shetland Yell Unst Heritage Information This path originally related to the lighthouse which was engineered between 1854 57 by David and Thomas Stevenson uncle and father respectively of Robert Louis Stevenson The lighthouse is located on a 200 foot high skerry called Muckle Flugga lying about a kilometre north of the cliffs on the north and west of Hermaness Hill Supplies for the lighthouse had to be brought in from a shore station several kilometres away at the head of Burra Firth The shore

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=137 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    Path Path distance 1 5km Accessibility info Suitable for pedestrians Back to Search Route Description The track leaves the unclassified road and runs northwards along the shore of Semblister loch before descending towards the shore where the church is located The route is signposted by the council from the start point It is easily followed as it is used by farm vehicles but is usually pretty muddy in places so boots would be recommended OS Landranger 3 Shetland North Mainland Heritage Information In the late 18th century it was decided to relocate the church from its traditional location at St Mary s Chapel in Sand to a more central location The graveyard remained at the old chapel site A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland by Samuel Lewis 1846 says about this kirk in the parish of Sandsting and Aithsting The church was built in 1780 and reseated in 1824 and contains sittings for 437 persons Previously to its erection there was a church in each of the two districts and the present edifice was raised in a central situation for the more regular performance of divine service but it is found inconvenient for general attendance many of the inhabitants being separated

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=138 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    pedestrians Back to Search Route Description This path starts at Houss at the south end of the road on East Burra It follows a vehicle track down to Ayre Dyke a shingle bar joining the peninsula of Houss Ness to the rest of the island A path is signed to a viewpoint on the Ward of Symbister but the track continues almost due south to reach the abandoned croft of

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=139 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    in 1864 and the population was cleared in the early 1870s to create sheep farms Setter farm was established in 1872 and included the crofts at Aith and Aithness The 3 crofters Catherine Nelson nee Smith Thomas Smith and John Sinclair and their families together with the occupants of the other 6 houses had to leave However John Sinclair died at Aithness in 1879 so it is thought that he may have had a subtenancy he is described as a master shoemaker These changes in Bressay were brought about by the death in August 1871 of Mrs Margaret Cameron Mouat the sole owner of the island The following report appeared in The Saturday Herald Shetland Gazette on September 16th 1871 Last week the tenants in Bressay were given to understand distinctly the terms on which they will be allowed to remain in their present holdings The conditions are such that the island has been turned into a bochim All who are able to remove have resolved to do so at once but there are few in circumstances to rise and go to a country where the oppressor dare not touch them an hence the sighing and crying of the bewildered people are painful to hear They have been active both on land and sea and though toiling hard daily they have lived in some degree of comfort until now that the demise of the last Mouat to whom the property belonged has put them under a new regime and one which they believe must end in their destruction though attempts are made to persuade them that it is only for their benefit This is much like the boy who while pelting the young ducks kept saying It s all for your good little duckies it s all for your good

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=140 (2016-02-09)
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