web-archive-uk.com


Web directory, archive
Search web-archive-uk.com:


Find domain in archive system:
web-archive-uk.com » UK » H » HERITAGEPATHS.CO.UK

Total: 444

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    0 7km Accessibility info Suitable for pedestrians Back to Search Route Description The path starts at a small car park at the end of an unclassified road from Bigton and makes its way down to the beach and across to St Ninian s Isle by a tombolo defined as a bar of sand or gravel connecting an island to the mainland This means there is tidal action on both sides of the bar unlike a normal sandspit and lagoon The sand bar consists of white sand and it is almost always possible to cross dry shod except in big storms The island and sand bar is known as one of Shetland s most famous beauty spots OS Landranger 4 Shetland South Mainland Heritage Information The path rises steeply through loose sand to reach the ruins of St Ninian s Church which was the scene of a famous archaeological discovery in July 1958 A schoolboy volunteer working with an Aberdeen University archaeological dig discovered a hoard of Pictish silverware which had been there since approximately the 9th century when it is thought they were hidden underneath the church to avoid them falling into the hands of Viking raiders The church was

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=141 (2016-02-09)
    Open archived version from archive


  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    fishing was taking place The term haaf refers to cod ling and tusk long line fishing in the pre steam era i e up to about the end of the 19th century The fishing took place about 15 40 miles out from the north west coast of Shetland and the boats used were sixerns or sixereens six oared boats with auxiliary sail Since the fish needed to be cured salted and dried as quickly as possible shore stations were built close to the fishing grounds mostly in the remote sparsely inhabited north west of the islands At these stations an all male workforce lived for the duration of the season June to August their time occupied by preparation of lines for fishing rowing out to the fishing grounds catching their haul and then rowing back to preserve what they had caught by salting and drying Twenty or so roofless buildings can still be seen at Fethaland However the roofs of these houses were generally temporary contemporary photographs of haaf fishing stations show much use of old spars masts and sailcloth About 60 boats used this area at the height of operations Since these were open boats the fishing was highly dangerous in bad weather After the Gloup Disaster in 1881 a move over to larger boats operating from bigger population centres took place and by 1900 the Fethaland fishing station was abandoned The day of 20th July 1881 began as what is referred to as a day atween wadders There had been strong winds for days and the boats had been kept ashore but that morning dawned clear with light winds and although there was still a heavy sea running the men were keen to get to sea Going up to 40 miles to the fishing grounds using simple landmarks

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=142 (2016-02-09)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    runs for 1 75 kilometres between the croft of Vementry and the small community of Clousta to the south The terrain between is undulating moorland with numerous lochs and is uninhabited and roadless A well marked path much of which has been recently restored runs between the two places and was used on a very regular basis in the earlier part of the 20th century by two different types of

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=143 (2016-02-09)
    Open archived version from archive


  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    of Kinlochewe Take the left hand track which goes N up Gleann na Muice and beyond its end continue along a path up the glen to the south east end of Lochan Fada From there bear NE towards Loch Meallan an Fhudair and beyond there continue N on a level traverse to the Bealach na Croise There is a path of sorts on the north west side of the stream flowing NE from the bealach and lower down cross to join the path on its east side Go N along the east side of Loch an Nid and down the path beside the Abhainn Loch an Nid until it joins a track near Achnegie Follow this track uphill and across high moorland to Loch Coire Chaorachain beyond which the track drops down through birch woods to reach the A832 road at Corrie Hallie 4km from Dundonnell Hotel OS Landranger 19 Gairloch Heritage Information These old crosscountry routes were probably used for a variety of different purposes They were used for droving at times and would certainly have been used by traders and other people travelling from community to community Roy s Military Survey of Scotland 1747 55 shows a road

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=144 (2016-02-09)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    gradual descent across very boggy ground in which only traces of the path are visible and reach the Allt Giubhais Beag just above Aultguish Inn This excellent Active Outdoors piece by John Davidson from February 2014 gives an idea of what to expect on the way OS Landranger 20 Beinn Dearg Heritage Information The British Fisheries Society built houses at Ullapool in summer 1788 establishing a successful base for a herring fishery The Old Statistical Account 1791 1799 reported that in Ullapool there was a red herring house where they cured last year 500 barrels fine red herring this was not the only fishing house others are mentoned at Isle Martin and Isle Tanera The cured herring was usually sent to markets in Leith and Greenock and sold at a high price Parliament and the British Fisheries Society subsequently supported the building of a road to carry fish from Ullapool to Dingwall it was completed in 1797 and is shown on Arrowsmith s map of 1807 The OSA refers to the route as excellent where lately nothing could be carried but in creels on horseback carts and carriages can now travel with the greatest ease and expedition This road consists of 38 miles and has cost government about 4500 including bridges of which there must be a good many in its course However this praise was premature as the road fell quickly into disrepair as only twelve years later there were demands for its renewal it appears that the road had been of poor quality and inadequately maintained By 1835 the New Statistical Account refers to the road as having been for many years not only useless but dangerous to foot passengers and riders on horseback and to wheel carriages almost impassable The old road was replaced by a new

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=145 (2016-02-09)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    very pleased to announce that we have a lovely new Campsies map leaflet showing this old route and other paths in the area To get your hands on one simply send us an SAE c o ScotWays see address top right and we ll post one out to you From a lay by west of Lairdshill Place a signed path goes up through woodland and onto a straight level path Follow this until Balmalloch Road and cross into Corrie Road At the south entrance to Kilsyth Academy the old railway track bed continues and goes east for 0 5km past Balmalloch Primary School to near its main entrance from Kingsway From Garrell Avenue 100m from its junction with Kingsway and Allanfauld Road a rough road called Neilston Walk passes in front of private houses before crossing the Garrel Burn by a pedestrian bridge The route crosses Hill Road and reaches Tak ma doon Road after 0 6km OS Landranger 64 Glasgow Heritage Information The High Line or Neilston Walk is the line of a former mineral railway between Neilston and Dumbreck Before 1860 coal and ironstone from the mines near Neilston had had to be carted away on rough roads The Bairds of Gartsherrie built the mineral railway to connect with the canal at Twechar it later connected with the Kelvin Valley Railway and Dumbreck Pit Muir and Wood used Baird s railway to send coal and coke to Gavell Station on the Kelvin Valley Railway line the minerals would have been carted in a train of tubs hauled by small locomotives called pugs The line may have also served the now disused quarries near Colzium House On OS mapping from the 1920s it can be seen that from Dumbreck Pit the mineral line used to run south under the

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=146 (2016-02-09)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    A832 at bridge over Dundonnell River NH 114 856 End location A835 bridge over River Broom east of Inverbroom Lodge NH 185 842 Geographical area Ross and Cromarty Path Type Rural Path Path distance 8 6km Accessibility info Suitable for pedestrians Back to Search Route Description From Dundonnell follow the farm track and cross the footbridge over the Dundonnell River Go past Eilean Darach to the minor public road and turn right along it up Strath Beag for 2km After passing Dundonnell House turn left off the road just before the bridge at Brae map ref 114 856 and take the path to the right away from the farmhouse home of Frank Fraser Darling in the early 1930s and leaving it soon climb steeply to join a well defined track This rises to 400m before passing the north end of Loch an Tiompain and crosses an old stone dam map ref 166 845 The descent to Croftown is less well defined gradual at first then steeply to a zig zag beside a wood and exits beside cottages to a minor road at Inverbroom 1km south of the head of Loch Broom and a few hundred metres from the A835 road

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=147 (2016-02-09)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    Eilgan Kenmore NG 754 579 Geographical area Ross and Cromarty Path Type Coffin Road Path distance 14 7km Accessibility info Suitable for pedestrians Back to Search Route Description From Applecross village go round the head of the bay and take the private road which is a right of way up the north west side of the River Applecross past Hartfield Follow the road past two plantations to its end and continue along the left hand path which turns N and goes in an almost straight line across the desolate interior of the Applecross peninsula to Kenmore An alternative finish to this walk which is 2km shorter is to take the right hand path from the road end and go NE to Inverbain OS Landranger 24 Raasay Applecross Loch Torridon Heritage Information Both these paths are old coffin routes which were used in time past by burial parties going to Clachan church at Applecross Bay There are various cairns along the route which indicate where the procession would have rested and possibly drank to the deceased They are both very long coffin roads and it is entirely understandable that people would need frequent rests along the way The Applecross Heritage Centre

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=148 (2016-02-09)
    Open archived version from archive





web-archive-uk.com, 2018-01-19