web-archive-uk.com


Web directory, archive
Search web-archive-uk.com:


Find domain in archive system:
web-archive-uk.com » UK » H » HERITAGEPATHS.CO.UK

Total: 444

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    shoulder of Green Humbleton St Cuthbert s Way heads east at NT850272 but instead stay on the Pennine Way until the border at NT853268 leaving the Way to strike south east between White Law and Madam Law to go east to Trowupburn There turn north for the Hetha Burn which can be followed to its meeting with the Elsdon Burn where the St Cuthbert s Way is regained Westward along the Way is the return route to Kirk Yetholm via Elsdonburn OS Landranger 74 Heritage Information Kirk Yetholm has a long association with the Gypsy Travellers who made the surrounding area their home well before the settlement of the valley in the 1700s The local laird build cottages for his tenants and tradition tells more than one story of the landowner s gratitude to the local traveller community resulting in their settling in the village Kirk Yetholm became their capital of sorts and as a result they erected the Gypsy Palace where the self styled King of the Gypsies lived through to the end of the 19th century This walk takes you right past the Gypsy Palace now self catering holiday accomodation though perhaps not quite as elegant as you

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=229 (2016-02-09)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    This route generally follows the Low Level Pennine Way to Cheviot Burnhead is reached by heading ESE from Kirk Yetholm then turning south along the Halter Burn From Burnhead go SE up the slope of Latchley Hill to the col between The Curr and Black Hag then SE to the Border Follow the Border ridge south over The Schil 601m and round the head of the College Burn to Auchope

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=230 (2016-02-09)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    during construction of the Blackwater dam one from Kinlochleven in the east and the other from Altnafeadh in the south They meet at the dam NN246599 That from Kinlochleven is the more straightforward as it initially follows the West Highland Way WHW then branches away from it in order to follow closely the line of the conduit on the south side of the River Leven The route to Altnafeadh is now trackless so is more challenging These two routes can be combined with a section of the WHW Devil s Staircase to form a loop trail Heritage Information The Blackwater Dam was constructed between 1905 and 1909 to power an aluminium smelter in downstream Kinlochleven It was the last major construction project in Scotland to be built without the aid of machinery As such it required the labour of some 3 000 workers mostly navvies from Ireland The navvies lived in a self constructed village below the dam the remains of which can be easily seen today by the piles of rubbish There is also a small graveyard for the navvies who died in the dam s construction either from accidents or sickness Several also died while attempting to cross

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=231 (2016-02-09)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    by the east of East Knock and the west of Cowie Hill The direct path to Tarfside is via the Buskhead Bridge but unfortunately this bridge is in a poor and deteriorating condition 2011 As the adjacent ford at Buskhead is not advised for the time being it may be better to follow other rights of way to Dalbrack in order to cross the river there instead then head to Tarfside along the road ii Southeast of Stonyford the path is a lot less distinct and harder to find We have no recent survey of this southernmost section of the path and would be grateful for an update Heritage Information This route is said to have been used by distillers trying to avoid attention it is a remote and rough track The route links directly with the ancient Firmounth and Fungle roads so it likely to have been an important part of the old network of routes through the hills from Deeside to Strathmore The placename of Stonyford indicates that most traffic probably crossed the West Water there and continued along what is now a public road to Bridgend and thence onwards between the ancient Caterhuns Perhaps it was mainly

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=232 (2016-02-09)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    Description Via Barrel Brig over River Ore and Wemyss Estate Woodlands A good well bottomed path throughout except section between bings between railway lines OS Landranger 59 St Andrews Kirkcaldy Glenrothes Heritage Information This route is said to have been used by Mary Queen of Scots when travelling between Wemyss Castle and Falkland Palace In 1565 at Wemyss Castle Mary met her future husband Lord Darnley they had met 5 years earlier when she was in mourning for her first husband this second meeting resulted in marriage within six months Although the route does not appear in particularly old maps it was perhaps considered old and out of use by the time Roy was making his survey in the mid eighteenth century This route goes in a very straight line from West Wemyss to Coaltown of Balgonie where it probably continued but is obscured by the railway line It likely met with the current road network again in Markinch where it joined the A92 There is an old bridge on this route called Barrel Brig so named because of its barrel vaulting We are informed that in 1725 it was called the New Bridge and it is this name that

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=233 (2016-02-09)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    accessing the cemetery at Fala signed Access to cemetery only After the gate to the cemetery signed Footpath to A7 5 1 4 miles follow green squares the track is metalled For the first 1km the track is within a plantation strip used for rearing pheasants On approaching the double line of electricity pylons there is a wooden vehicle gate with adjacent pedestrian gate signed Special Protection Area by Fala Estate Trust and SNH Peatland habitat The track continues beside a conifer plantation to a car parking area after the trees at a junction of tracks and another waymarker square Thereafter it is an obvious metalled track with Fala Flow Loch to the east and the ruins of Fala Luggie Tower to the west At NT 425 573 there is a track junction it is straight ahead to Upper Brotherstone but instead turn right for Brothershiels with another sign Footpath to the A68 31 4 miles and a green square at the next gate The rest of the route is a farm vehicle track to Brothershiels Farm and the boundary between East Lothian and the Borders The route has now been waymarked Heritage Information This old road was actually part

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=234 (2016-02-09)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    phone antennae can be seen to the NE beyond the M74 The surfaced track goes under the motorway then 100m after this under some large pylons After another 90m the track turns NNW for 500m still ascending the bottomed track Just after the next bend SE take the first track on the RHS which is grassed over This bypasses both antennae masts on the west side Continuing on the grassy track 50m beyond the antennae bear left ESE when after 110m the track leads to a comer of a fenced field on the LHS Continue on the grassy track ESE then E to the top of a gentle rise From this top head roughly SE soon regaining the L R T heading towards a stand of fir trees at Birshaw Rig Spot Height 332m About 50m before the stand of trees take the L R T on the left heading ESE and after passing close to the trees the track bears NE for 225m It then turns north for 100m where there is a sharp hairpin bend to the right Take this now heading SE and gently descending After 230m from the bend a corner of a field fence is reached Heading NE the track now aims towards Tinto Hill ahead in the distance From here the L R T is easily followed skirting the SE side of Bodinglee Law then crossing a burn 250m before Bodinglee Farm Leave the farm track at the burn to pass through a field to reach the surfaced road just before a shed at NS 902 304 The narrow road is then followed to Fallside and Newton Farms and Wiston Village Heritage Information This track is depicted as a road in quite old maps such as William Forrest s map of the County of

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=235 (2016-02-09)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    the north heading directly for the Three Brethren now in direct view This is at odds with the line on the map which runs more to the west by passing the summit by some 300m However the line as described is the stronger and more obvious the objective for the modern user undoubtedly being the three distinctive cairns The surroundings are open heather moorland and anyone wishing to follow the mapped line could easily do so Approaching the cairns there is a fence easily crossed by a stile The route westward is now part of the Southern Upland Way and is waymarked Alternatively start on the A708 at Yarrowford NT407300 Ascend northwest along the line of the Minchmoor Road joining the above route where it enters the forest just before Hare Law 9 8km This Yarrowford variant of the Minchmoor Track also forms part of the Cross Borders Drove Road promoted by South of Scotland Countryside Trails SoSCT along with part of the Gypsy Glen Drove Road and the route through the Cauldstane Slap which means this section at least should be accessible to horse riders Heritage Information The Minchmoor Track is one of the oldest paths in Scotland and one of the best candidates for a pre Roman route While firm evidence in support of the Minchmoor as a Pictish road has yet to be unearthed the sheer age of the road is demonstrated in particular by the defensive earthworks including the ancient Catrail and Wallace s Trench passed along the way At least three variants of the route have been claimed the oldest is said to have run over the shoulder of Peat Law and across Linglee Hill That route was replaced by that which runs up from Philiphaugh and is described here although it should be noted that the old route did not run directly by the Three Brethren In its turn the Philiphaugh route was replaced by that up from Yarrowford which is labelled as Minchmoor Road by the OS at least as far back as their 1st edition 6 mapping This last variant is the only one shown on Roy s mapping of Lowland Scotland 1752 1755 it is marked as road from Peebles to Selkirk What we know for sure is that the route across the Minch Moor was the main Borders highway between east and west via Peebles into the medieval era It was mentioned by Edward I in his Itinerary and referred to in the State Documents of 1505 when a man was hired to keep the road free from robbers for the eight days around the Roxburgh Fair on 5th August In 1645 the Marquess of Montrose is thought to have retreated along the Minchmoor track to Peebles after his defeat by the Covenanter army at the Battle of Philiphaugh Two extensive defensive barriers are passed along this route one called Wallace s Trench and the other the Catrail Wallace s Trench is an earthen breastwork from 4 to 6 feet

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=236 (2016-02-09)
    Open archived version from archive





web-archive-uk.com, 2018-01-19