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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    mapping it can be seen that this path originally started along the south bank of the Auchencat Burn shortly fording it This path follows the north bank of Auchencat Burn to 095 114 then follows the course of a tributary stream to the well From the kissing gate at the start of the route follow the side of the Auchencat Burn The path goes up through fields across a small but clear settlement Where the path leads onto hill land the old route via the river is now difficult to follow steps down to the river still exist but the 2 bridges to cross the river and back look very tricky The low level path is indistinct in places A better route is to follow a clear track heading up hill which then levels out and heads across the slope coming out a short distance below the spa The well head was empty when we were there OS Landranger 78 Nithsdale and Annandale Heritage Information The chalybeate iron rich spring of Hartfell Spa was discovered in 1748 by John Williamson who was leading a mining operation by Auchencat Burn This spring water had curative properties for debility and anaemia Unlike

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=285 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    on Spey to Forres It has been designated by Scottish Natural Heritage as one of Scotland s Great Trails a Dava Way leaflet is available The Dava Way also forms part of the Moray Way a 153km circular route OS Landranger 36 Grantown Aviemore Cairngorm area 27 Nairn Forres Heritage Information The Dava Way was the Highland Railway s original link from Inverness to the south enabling railway passengers to avoid changing at Aberdeen and saving almost 3 hours travel time It opened in 1863 and at its highest point crossing Dava Moor this route reached 1052ft above sea level Although the station at Dunphail was located in an area of low population its platforms were very long and it is said to have had the longest platform in Britain This is because it was an important station for the transportation of cattle to the markets of the south It is possible that the Loan Road which lies to the east of Dunphail was one of the feeder routes to the station Subsequently locomotive technology improved further and it became possible to climb the Slochd and Drumossie Muir from Inverness so a more direct line was built Upon that route

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=286 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    Society 24 Annandale Street Edinburgh EH7 4AN T 0131 558 7123 F 0131 558 1222 email facebook twitter flickr Join Us Donate SEARCH BY MAP ADVANCED SEARCH Coffin Road Bealach Eorabhat South Harris Site Design Hosting by Digital Routes Heritage Paths Coal roads from Ceres Start location Ceres NO 400 116 End location Ceres NO 400 116 Geographical area Path Type Path distance 11 3km Accessibility info Back to Search

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=287 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    gravel surface This continues to the B9103 where a steep ramp and steps lead up onto the public road The latter feature may restrict this section s accessibility On the south side of the B9103 there is a modern gate with a pedestrian access and this is followed by another gate blocked by large rocks with a small access gap at the side After this the track continues on a good surface until the next gate at the Easter Greens access road where there is a gate with rocks blocking access to the North section back to B9103 This section appears to be accessible to walkers and possibly cyclists only From Easter Greens to Maryfield the track is level wide with a good surface and could be used by all abilities It is also probably the most interesting section with Loch Spynie Spynie Canal and the Palace of Spynie all adjacent to the route and reasonably visible Although the old rail line continues south as a farm track it soon runs into a very wet area which has been used as a silage pit Our surveyor described this part as not easy or safe so it is not recommended Instead

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=288 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    leads to the Abhainn Ghaig opposite Gaick Lodge There has been a bridge here but it is washed away and a potentially dangerous ford must be made of the river to reach the lodge Once across the river a good track leads by the lodge and S to the Allt Gharbh Ghaig part of the Gaick Pass route Just before this river is forded a track heads left up the Allt Gharbh Ghaig This track crosses the first burn with footbridge and then crosses two outflows of the Allt Domhainn neither of which had visible water on the visit but appeared likely to be potentially difficult in wet weather Shortly after this the track runs into flood debris and 2 options are possible The first is to attempt to follow the track which can be found crossing the burn a couple of times on grassy flats before ending on the W side of the burn at a bridge This was easy to do on the visit as the burn was low and stepping stones plentiful but in wet weather it could be difficult The alternative is to follow a footpath through heather on the E side of the burn to the bridge at about NN774819 and cross to the W side A small track the old road then crosses the outflow of the Allt a Chapirnich which had very little water but a deep rough stony bed and again might be difficult in wet weather From this point Comyn s Road is picked up climbing a zig zag and traversing the steep slopes above the burn onto the plateau of Bac na Greige On this plateau it is thought that Walter Comyn met his terrible end falling from his horse which galloped away severing a leg and leaving his body by the road The old road can be followed with some care and has a number of cairns on it until on Bac na Greige a small upright stone appears to mark the crossing point on the plateau From here the road is less obvious for a stretch until it is picked up more clearly on the descent to Feith na Mad where it fords the burn and climbs the slope towards Sron a Chleirich The road is not really obvious on this stretch but skirts a small top at Carn an Fhiadhain before descending to another ford on Allt a Mhuillin on the W side of Sron a Chleirich The road can be found dropping to the ford and rising across the slopes of Sron a Chleirich The ford is at the top of a steep gully which has eroded over time and a slight detour upstream makes the crossing easier and safer From here the road can be followed W of the summit and starts to descend the S shoulder before disappearing The surveyor took a direct line from here to the old sheilings on the Allt a Choire Bhig down a steep initial slope and then across

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=289 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    at the end of the unclassified road at Loch More Cottage ND083461 Cross the bridge over the Thurso River Where the track divides at ND085454 take the right hand branch At ND084447 the track crosses the Allt nam Beist which once powered a watermill A millstone can be seen lying at the side of the track and about 200m east can be found the low mounds which are all that remain of the mill together with the mill lade fed by a dam further upstream The track now passes the former township of Achscoriclate and the supposed remains of St Bridget s Chapel A well preserved corn drying kiln can be seen at the end of one of the house ruins The track ends at the former township of Backlass ND080424 where a stone circle from a much earlier era can be found among the stone dykes of the farmstead with a recumbent standing stone a short distance away Return by retracing the outward route until 200m north of Achscoriclate where a track branches south east at ND083443 Follow this track to a ford where the remains of shieling huts can be seen Continue to the former township of Balavreed and its later farmstead From here a diversion no path can be made to the township of Buailemor 800m to the west where the remains of a corn drying kiln can be found South of Balavreed the path deteriorates but can be easily followed over wet ground to Thulachan ND110408 which soon comes into view at the south end of Lochan Thulachan Here again a later farmstead stands in place of the old township This house was later used as a shooting lodge Return the same way towards Balavreed A short diversion 200m east reveals the well preserved footings of

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=290 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    South Harris Site Design Hosting by Digital Routes Heritage Paths Craggie to Lutterbeg Start location Craggie NC 614 507 End location Lutterbeg NC 626 486 Geographical area Sutherland Path Type Rural Path Path distance 0km Accessibility info Suitable for pedestrians Back to Search Route Description The route follows a good path to the pre clearance settlement of Lutterbeg Start at the A836 at the south end of the enclosure known as Craggie Park NC614507 A vehicle may be parked here or beside a sheepfold just to the south Cross the bridge over the outflow Feith Ghaineamhach of Loch Loyal and follow the path which follows the shore of the loch After crossing a burn at NC623508 the path divides The left hand branch goes to the open bothy of Achnanclach Take the right hand branch which continues down the east shore After passing through a gate the path enters a strip of native woodland of birch and hazel After leaving the woodland the path soon enters an extensive grassy area where the dykes and house footings of the former settlement can still be seen This is Lutterbeg Heritage Information Both sides of Loch Loyal were well populated until the townships

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=291 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    merges with a forest road at ND006473 At ND001468 just west of the bridge crossing the Allt nam Breac the route divides The right hand branch goes directly to Cnoc na Gall the left branch goes by Rumsdale before rejoining the route Note that the junction can not be clearly seen Directions for both routes follow Direct Route by Cnoc na Gall Follow the forest road for 5 5km to NC969446 At this point the Ca na Catanach leaves the forest road and enters an area of conifers now felled before reaching a ride at ND965443 where it is clearly visible as a grassy channel After crossing a tributary of Allt a Clair Loch the path is obscured by short section of felled conifers before crossing a deer fence at NC960440 Navigation is now difficult through an area of peat hags and it is best to head for the railway bridge which crosses the Allt a Bhadain Dubh at NC952435 A walkway under the bridge enables the railway to be safely crossed The path becomes clear 100m southwest of the bridge and the route ahead can be seen climbing the shoulder of Cnoc na Gall After crossing a deer fence at NC943431 the junction with the Rumsdale branch is reached at the head of a small burn NC934425 Route by Rumsdale Leave the forest road at ND001468 and enter a curving ride through which the path is faintly visible before it merges with another forest road at ND000463 Follow the forest road over a level crossing and past Badnaheen until a gate is reached at Clach Seasaimh a small cairn NC997429 The path now enters the open hill and is obvious up to NC992425 but then intermittent until the Rumsdale pasture is reached at NC987413 After passing the old settlement of Rumsdale the route follows the north bank of the Rumsdale Water initially as a Landrover track After NC980407 the path fades but becomes clear at NC971412 and is easily followed up to NC963412 where it disappears for about 1km before becoming visible again at NC957415 After a deer fence at NC939424 the junction with the direct route is reached at NC934425 From this junction the route proceeds southwest to Baledigle forest where it enters a ride at NC932424 and continues to NC925419 The path becomes very uncertain for about 800m in a complex area of intersecting rides and it is best to navigate to NC920416 where it becomes visible again continuing through NC915414 crossing a burn at NC915414 and reaching the Halladale River at NC913413 After crossing the river the route crosses an unplanted area before entering the trees beside a small boulder at NC910412 then emerging into a ride at NC909411 The path is now clear crossing a forest road at NC906409 and continuing to the crossing of the Bealach Burn at NC901403 This is the location of the former junction with a branch to Forsinard which can be seen leading north as a forest road A deer

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=292 (2016-02-09)
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