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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    Cowdenbeath Rail Station 165 918 and from there walk to 171 907 along the A908 busy road and road junctions where much care is needed Then follow the path through Moss Morran occassional flooding in wood at 166 904 with dangerous slippy wooden board and also at 167 898 Continue to follow the path to B925 via 155 895 and then cross the road and follow path to Fordell Then walk south on unclassified road for a short distance past houses Access to the path is at the standing stone on the left hand side and proceed to 156 885 Continue on the path through 155 878 and 154 876 This paved section probably follows line of railway At 152 871 there is a problem with a new Muirdean open cast mine and the path is now lost A detour for walkers is available to the west Return to the line of the path and from 149 865 to 150 858 is a section of what seems to be a cutting of the railway line Continue past Vantage House and take the path on the right hand side to see the bridge across the railway at 151 852 Sadly from here on the line of the railway track is very difficult to access but a possible diversion is available through the woods to 145 844 and using the recently constructed path beside the B916 to Hillend OS Landranger 65 Falkirk West Lothian Heritage Information This route was originally a Waggonway coming from Cowdenbeath and Crossgates to St David s Harbour in Inverkeithing Bay It was used to export coal and minerals from the mines around Cowdenbeath and Crossgates for shipping from Inverkeithing The Fordell Railways was still in use in 1939 Interestingly there was an explosion along its route in

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=13 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    Suitable for pedestrians Suitable for horses Back to Search Route Description The start at the Kilmany end is on the west side of the axed railway bridge at Grid Ref 387 217 where a narrow earthy path leads up from the road onto the trackbed of the old North Fife line Hoofprints indicate regular equestrian use and there is some suggestion that the route is strimmed Heading westwards there is a children s playpark on the right north initially followed by a small group of houses which are passed on their south side The railway track narrows into a wooded cutting and passes under the A92 The onward route is never in doubt the line being either in cuttings or on embankments all vegetated Despite the worn line of hoofprints the encroaching vegetation needs mechanised action the whole length of the route being too much for manual remedies The one time bridge over the minor road at Grid Ref 372 220 is now gone and the route dips down to the road and up again The going is as before with some clear stretches some encroaching vegetation but never any serious impediment Circa Grid Ref 364 218 a fence climbable crosses the route At the next minor road Grid Ref 360 214 the bridge over the road is still in place though the route ends just a few steps beyond the bridge and a short steep path descends the left south side of the embankment to the public road From this spot the A92 and Rathillet are about a kilometre away OS Landranger sheet 59 Perth Alloa Auchterader or sheet 54 Dundee Montrose Heritage Information This path is a small part of what was the Newburgh and North Fife Line which formed a link between Newburgh and Dundee The railway

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=14 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    to follow the field boundary while the surface of the old road gives way to tree cover After another kilometre the course of the old road disappears into a very dense plantation and it is necessary to continue straight through a fire road where after a couple of hundred metres you meet a well built access track Here there is a signpost directing walkers to the left Follow this track to the end where it meets a fence and skirts around to the left there should be a gate at this point You meet the old road again at roughly NT857688 This is the hardest part of the walk to navigate as the only clue as to the existence of the old road is the heavy gorse on the left and a slight line through deep heather off to the right Follow the slight line for a couple of hundred metres which is quite heavy going and is a noticable terrace in places Follow this till you meet a field boundary fence and then follow the fence to the Dowlaw Road We don t have a recent survey but understand that the route has recently been thoroughly cleared and so should now be easier to walk and navigate OS Landranger 67 Duns Dunbar Eyemouth Heritage Information While possibly not as significant or as busy as its westerly neighbour The Old Post Road this old road was undoubtedly important It is likely to be the road marked Road to Eymouth in Roy s Military Survey of 1747 1755 and as Roy only marked roads that were of some significance this must have been important in the 18th century Its main use was probably as an alternative route for those travelling north or south by way of Coldingham The Old Post Road

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=15 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    to receive updated reports as to the route s accessibility From Bonchester Bridge go south along the road by Braidhaugh to Cleuch Head where a track climbs southeast to the east side of Wolfelee Hill and goes south over Wardmoor Hill The Wheel Causeway enters Wauchope Forest where the trees form a right angled corner From there take the middle of the three rides which is wider than usual and can become overgrown before being cleared periodically for 6km through the forest to a gate a little to the west of Wheelrig Head 447m From the gate go south southwest for 400m and follow a forest road down the east side of Wormscleuch Burn to Myredykes To follow the actual line of the Wheel Causeway south of Wheelrig Head is now quite difficult being overgrown with only a narrow path From Myredykes it is 4km to Sauchtree and 6km to Kielder by minor roads OS Landranger 80 Cheviot Hills Kielder Water Heritage Information In medieval times the Wheel Causeway was the road from Roxburgh then the largest town in the Borders to Annandale Edward I travelled along this route in 1296 On Roy s map 1755 it is named Road

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=16 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    trending south past Knockelly to Auchenhessnane where our surveying commences Here a farm track initially follows the north side of the Auchenhessnane burn then crosses over it by a ford Once through the first gate after the ford it is important to cross to the dyke on the south side of the field since the track is not well marked at this point and the correct exit gate is in the south west corner of the field A faint track is now followed which leads to a gate and ford across a small burn Vehicle tracks now largely disappear but old tracks can be followed through a narrow pass Duddiestone Hass As the highest ground is passed Bennan farm becomes visible and after crossing into pasture from hill ground a muddy farm track is followed down to Bennan from where a farm road runs directly down to the unclassified road at Mounthoolie Bridge Passing through a gate from the unclassified road 0 5km south of Mounthoolie Bridge the route rises directly up a hillside between double dykes At the junction with a plantation follow the dyke south eastwards to the sheep pens at NX785931 Here the fences are crossed to go on a wide south west trending break through the forest This section unlike the rest is rough tussock sedge underfoot At the south side of the forest the route stays just west of Bardennoch hill and a track is picked up adjacent to the abandoned farm of Upper Bardennoch The track here is double dyked and drops down to Moniaive crossing the Dalwhat Water at Hall Bridge The going underfoot generally is quite good except through the forest break There are no major obstructions though wire fences dykes and non opening gates have to be negotiated in places OS

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=17 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    Bealach Eorabhat South Harris Site Design Hosting by Digital Routes Heritage Paths Haxalgate Start location B6359 Dingleton south of Melrose NT 543 332 End location Bourjo Eildon Hills NT 548 327 Geographical area Lothian and Borders Path Type Industrial Path Path distance 0 8km Accessibility info Suitable for pedestrians Back to Search Route Description This is a short path starting at the access road to Dingleton Mains but quickly branching off to the right and heading southwest towards the pass where the Bourjo is located just before reaching St Cuthbert s Way OS Landranger 73 Peebles Galashiels surrounding area Heritage Information This is an old path to a very mysterious feature called the Bourjo Over the centuries there have been quite a few theories as to what this place was In 1760 R Pococke believed the path led to a grove of oaks where druids made sacrifices and it has been suggested that Haxa would indicate a high priestess of the Druids Romantic antiquarians like Sir Walter Scott also felt that it had connotations of witchcraft Others thought it might be a fortified place although there is no evidence of relevant structures However the reality is generally now considered to

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=18 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    continue up over the hill descending to Upper and Nether Stewarton Go east to the Lyne road the Old Post Road and south along it for about 0 5km then turn left on the road to Upper Kidston There take a left to cross the stream and go round north and east of Hamilton Hill to a broad track leading to Peebles This route is almost entirely accessible to horse riders and cyclists as most of it forms part of the South of Scotland Countryside Trails SoSCT network The fence in the middle of the Cauldstane Slap marks a local authority boundary and although there is a gate from that point north the route is less accessible However improvements have been made to this section s accessibility so for the latest information visit the SoSCT website The Cross Borders Drove Road continues as an SoSCT promoted trail using parts of the Gypsy Glen Drove Road and the Minchmoor Track It is now feasible to reach the start of the walk at Little Vantage from Kirknewton Head south from Kirknewton along the Leyden Road under the railway bridge and past Latch Farm After about a mile and a half there is a small car park on right for Selm Muir Wood A prominent fingerpost indicates the way to the Thieves Road and West Linton Taking the track into the forest for 500m turn left at a fingerpost leaving the edge of wood and into a field The farm track first drops down and then rises to Leyden Farm where you will see the Hilly Coo Wigwams Bear right around the farm complex turn right NT100633 up the waymarked track past a modern house and into a large field Take track up and across a field to a gate with guide post NT101638 Follow waymarked route around small disused quarry and across rough grassland to the Little Vantage car park OS Landranger 65 Falkirk West Lothian 72 Upper Clyde Valley and 73 Peebles Galashiels surrounding area Heritage Information Roy s map of 1755 calls the Cauldstane Slap route the Road to Queensferry It is an old drove road cattle were driven from Falkirk and north of there down through West Linton continuing to Peebles and St Mary s Loch eventually to England It is likely that James IV travelled this path in November of 1490 after buying a horse at Linlithgow In The Drove Roads of Scotland Haldane shows it as being the only route cattle were taken from north of the central belt south While it is unlikely to be the sole route it must have been of considerably importance and surely must have had tens of thousands of cattle travelling across it every year In the reverse direction sheep from the Linton markets were driven to the Highlands probably about 30 000 annually It is also known as many drove roads are as the Thief s Road as it must have been used by a fair number of cattle thieves

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=19 (2016-02-09)
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  • Heritage Paths - Search for Paths by Map
    of Coldingham NT 910 666 Geographical area Lothian and Borders Path Type Trade Route Path distance 1 1km Accessibility info Suitable for pedestrians Back to Search Route Description This is a well defined footpath linking Coldingham to St Abbs It starts just north of Coldingham along the B6438 and is signposted so should be easy to follow OS Landranger 67 Duns Dunbar Eyemouth area Heritage Information St Abbs harbour was

    Original URL path: http://www.heritagepaths.co.uk/pathdetails.php?path=20 (2016-02-09)
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web-archive-uk.com, 2017-12-15