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  • Buy to let - HousePriceWiki
    of buy to let investors start off with one property then with the rise in house prices they have withdrawn equity from the property for as much as the bank will allow them This withdrawn equity also known by the term MEW then goes to putting down the minimum deposit for the next property Any rental income is then also ploughed back into the pot for the deposit on yet another property Most buy to let landlords do not have repayment mortgages but instead just pay the bare minimum Interest only mortgages so that they can free up as much capital as possible to expand their empire To minimise the amount of capital required they BTL landlords typically have mortgages with high loan to valuations thus in the event of falling house prices putting them at risk of negative equity Now the problem with this strategy is that while they may say that they own 25 houses in reality it s the banks that own the properties and the buy to let investors has a tiny amount of equity in each property but relies on the house price inflation to erode away the debt Buy to Let landlords have gained

    Original URL path: http://www.housepricecrash.co.uk/wiki/index.php?title=Buy_to_let&oldid=3834 (2016-02-09)
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  • Investment - HousePriceWiki
    pension fund companies then have no choice but to go out and find property projects in which to invest in This is also the case for property unit trusts OEIC s and investment trusts At the time of writing April 2006 most of the large property funds are currently running and high cash levels of around 20 which is much higher than the long term average simply because there is too much money flowing into this asset class If you move down the scale to the medium size companies then the range of property investment becomes more diverse with more of a reliance on turning projects around quickly for a profit Many of these companies are looking for short to medium term returns on their investment rather that medium to long term Private developers Buy to Let This covers all the buy to let investors who either do this as a full time job or do it in addition to having a full time job and fit in developing around evenings weekends and holidays This is the area which has seen the biggest growth with the number of buy to let mortgage increasing from 120 300 in 2001 to a staggering 701 900 in 2005 This is without doubt the biggest factor in the current housing bubble which has been fuelled by the availability of cheap credit and low interest rates Secondary property investment It is also possible to invest in the housing market without getting your hands dirty There are a range of Unit trusts OEIC s Investment Trusts and various other property investment schemes to choose from You can also invest directly in the shares of house builders mortgage lenders or commercial developers Cash savings Cash can be invested in a wide range of savings account ranging from

    Original URL path: http://www.housepricecrash.co.uk/wiki/Investors (2016-02-09)
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  • Bank - HousePriceWiki
    Page Recent changes Random page Help Views Page Discussion View source History Tools What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Bank A bank is a company that borrows and lends money Banks are usually listed on the stock market See also Building Society Bank of England Northern Rock Retrieved from http www housepricecrash co uk wiki index php title Bank oldid 3645 Category Keywords About us

    Original URL path: http://www.housepricecrash.co.uk/wiki/Bank (2016-02-09)
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  • Mortgage equity withdrawal - HousePriceWiki
    up equity in your home For example if you bought a house for 100 000 and over the years the market price of your property increased to 150 000 then you would have equity in your house of 50 000 This does not take into account any mortgage repayments and any deposit that you intially put down on the purchase With record low interest rates levels and booming house prices credit has become cheap and people have rushed in their masses to withdraw equity from their homes They have seen how little extra their mortgage payments are after they have withdrawn their equity and used their homes as cash machines Sometime not just once but twice or more as they have seen the value of their home increase What people fail to realise if that debt is debt and needs to be paid back It may seem cheap at todays low interest rates but interest rates can and do change therefore in times when interest rates are higher the increase in debt is going to be harder to service Instead of MEWing to for materialistic ends what people should have been doing in this period of low interest rates is

    Original URL path: http://www.housepricecrash.co.uk/wiki/MEW (2016-02-09)
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  • Deposit - HousePriceWiki
    forum boss Navigation Main Page Recent changes Random page Help Views Page Discussion View source History Tools What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Deposit A deposit can either mean money put in to a savings account or money used to buy a house Retrieved from http www housepricecrash co uk wiki index php title Deposit oldid 3661 Category Keywords About us Contact us Glossary Link

    Original URL path: http://www.housepricecrash.co.uk/wiki/Deposit (2016-02-09)
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  • Loan to valuation - HousePriceWiki
    house is valued at 100 000 and the saver can put down a deposit of 20 000 then the loan is for 80 000 and thus the loan to valuation is only 80 An 80 loan to valuation is considered a low risk mortgage as the house price could fall be 20 before the loan exceeds the house price This protects the lendor Thus the interest rate on such a mortgage may be lower than a high loan to valuation mortgage A mortgage with a high loan to valuation of 120 is considered high risk as the borrower immediatly starts with negative equity If the borrower fails to keep up with repayments then the lendor may loose money when they reposse the property Note The lender will always try and charge the borrower for any losses that they incur The loan to valuation ratio is a critical topic for Buy to let BTL mortgages BTL mortgages typically have high loan to valuation ratios and the mortgage contract often contains wording that allows the lendor to demand more capital payments from the borrower if the ratio exceeds the amount specified in the contract This clause can be triggered by falling house

    Original URL path: http://www.housepricecrash.co.uk/wiki/Loan_to_valuation (2016-02-09)
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  • Landlord - HousePriceWiki
    wiki forum boss Navigation Main Page Recent changes Random page Help Views Page Discussion View source History Tools What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Landlord A person or company who rents out a flat or home See also Buy to let Retrieved from http www housepricecrash co uk wiki index php title Landlord oldid 3658 Categories Keywords Renting About us Contact us Glossary Link to

    Original URL path: http://www.housepricecrash.co.uk/wiki/Landlord (2016-02-09)
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  • Social impact of Buy to Let - HousePriceWiki
    changes Random page Help Views Page Discussion View source History Tools What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Social impact of Buy to Let Young people unable to purchase a property as Buy to let mop up the supply to increase their portfolios Retrieved from http www housepricecrash co uk wiki index php title Social impact of Buy to Let oldid 3779 Category Buy to Let

    Original URL path: http://www.housepricecrash.co.uk/wiki/Social_impact_of_Buy_to_Let (2016-02-09)
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