web-archive-uk.com


Web directory, archive
Search web-archive-uk.com:


Find domain in archive system:
web-archive-uk.com » UK » L » LITRO.CO.UK

Total: 1328

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • David Hargreaves, Author at Litro Magazine
    he can sleep on their couches He writes plays music wanders gets groceries drinks sleeps and wakes up to do it again hopefully in a different place hopefully on a different couch hoping a good story comes from it You can tell him what you think at jhargreaves231 gmail com Website Twitter Facebook Contact Us General 44 0 20 3371 9971 info litro co uk Sales Advertising enquiries 44 0 20 3371 9971 Email Sales Magazine Editorial editor litro co uk All Online Editorial online litro co uk Book Reviews Author Interviews reviews litro co uk Film Arts Editorial arts litro co uk Litro Lab Podcast litrolab litro co uk LitroTV litrotv litro co uk Litro Listings listings litro co uk Subscribe Stockists Submissions Advertising Our Team About Litro Litro Magazine is a free short stories and creative arts magazine in print and online Providing a place for readers writers and the broader creative community to discuss various aspects of literature arts and culture through features reviews non themed fiction interviews columns and more Perfect reading for those with busy lives When the first issue of Litro was published in April 2005 the main free paper for commuters and city dwellers was the morning Metro Since then many tabloid style free sheets have joined the field like the Metro these can be skim read and quickly discarded Litro is different our central aim has always been to provide commuters and city dwellers with an inspiring thought provoking alternative that takes you places you don t normally think about when travelling around the city We believe literary magazines should not just be targeted at writers themselves or even those with a particular interest in literature instead Litro believes in reaching the general reader whether they be a commuter someone browsing in

    Original URL path: http://www.litro.co.uk/author/jhargreaves231gmail-com/ (2016-02-15)
    Open archived version from archive

  • France Bans Excessively Thin Models. Will We?
    gaining weight through legislation may not necessarily be healthy for them We have to consider the repercussions of forcing models to become larger This could lead to depression or other mental illnesses Producing better resources and more support for people with eating disorders is essential It is unreasonable to assume that views on body image will adapt immediately While France is making progress it seems that others are still projecting an unhealthy body image Leading retailers regenerate the idea that skinny is beautiful their mannequins are half the size of a real human and their clothes are not consistent sizes Urban Outfitters have been boycotted and criticised for selling clothes that promote eating disorders One top that has engraved itself in my mind stated in bold print Eat Less Urban Outfitters have also been called up on editing pictures of their models to an excessive extent for example creating an unnatural thigh gap By forming unattainable goals for people who aspire to this body image trend retailers are in a way partly creating eating disorders This is not a new issue There have previously been movements showing the effects of eating disorders and admonishing their glorification Isabelle Caro was a French model and actress who campaigned against anorexia before dying of the illness at age 28 She worked with an Italian ad campaign pictured at 27kg under the headline No Anorexia Caro had wanted to display the horrific life threatening reality of battling with anorexia and to encourage women and girls not to strive for her weight not to admire her body The shocking photo of her protruding spine has I m sure inspired many other campaigns attempting to help promote healthy body image Australian author and TV host Ajay Rochester has begun an online campaign calling on the fashion industry to drop the plus size in order to encourage retailers to stop labelling different body types and instead stock all sizes The response to France s legislation has been mixed Haddad agrees with the measures I am with the legislation as it is part of a campaign against anorexia which is a serious mental health condition Many believe it is the right objective the right idea but the wrong action In the fashion industry some think it will create a disadvantage for France over the rest of the fashion world But surely health is more important than fashion Perhaps this should be a worldwide ruling for modelling agencies It has been debated that using BMI to measure whether a model is malnourished is a controversial measurement as it does not take into consideration muscle and body types For me personally my engagement is not with the BMI measurement it is with the fact that the French are taking a stand to eliminate this eat less nothing tastes as good as skinny feels culture we have bought in to Fashion is continuously progressing This year at New York Fashion week we saw Jamie Brewer walk down the catwalk the first

    Original URL path: http://www.litro.co.uk/2015/04/france-bans-excessively-thin-models-will-we/ (2016-02-15)
    Open archived version from archive

  • 10 Women’s Books in Translation you should be reading
    prose Aidt lights up the dark corners of human obsessions Baboon dazzles with rage and passion Unforgettable collection 7 A True Novel by Minae Mizumura 2014 Translated from Japanese by Juliet Winters Carpenter In a world where everybody is obsessed with Haruki Murakami Minae Mizumura s A True Novel is Japan s best kept secret Set in the 1960s Mizumura cleverly retells the story of Emily Brontë s Wuthering Heights in post war Japan but the novel goes beyond Brontë s masterpiece The sheer brilliance of Mizumura s storytelling is truly remarkable A True Novel is not only a timeless story of doomed lovers but with its large scale a meditation of the changes in the Japanese society under the influence of the Western world from the 50s to the 90s This is also one of the most beautifully produced books I have encountered in a long time included in the text are black and white photos A book that delights with its content and design 8 Happy Are the Happy by Yasmina Reza 2014 Translated from French by Sarah Ardizzone Yasmina Reza the French author is widely known for her formidable plays Art and God of Carnage recently adapted to the silver screen by the director Roman Polanski I had the pleasure of watching Reza speak during a book event in London where she read Happy Are the Happy in the original French version This cleverly structured novel is a look on marriages and families happiness and loneliness Reza captures the essence of life through a wonderful array of details and comical situations but always with great tenderness towards the people she s describing 9 Europe in Sepia by Dubravka Ugrešić 2014 Translated from Croatian by David Williams In this passionate collection of essays Ugrešić with ferocious precision dissects our modern lives The subjects among others include materialism nationalism global patriarchy and mass marketed culture Europe in Sepia is an honest unapologetic and often funny critique of the global age 10 What Lot s Wife Saw by Ioanna Bourazopoulou 2013 Translated from Greek by Yiannis Panas Winner of the 2008 Athens Prize for Literature What Lot s Wife Saw is an intriguing crime thriller novel set in the post apocalyptic world where large parts of Southern Europe are flooded The governor of the Colony which controls highly addictive violet salt from the Dead Sea Rift is found dead In comes Phileas Book a crossword compiler for a newspaper asked to read six confessions and find out the truth An incredibly imaginative and entertaining read We pick the most exciting new titles out there for the Litro Book Club and you ll get them sent to you before they hit the shops You ll get access to live author Q As and the chance to see your reviews published on the site It s a great way of meeting like minded book lovers too Join the Club About A M Bakalar A M Bakalar was born and raised in Poland

    Original URL path: http://www.litro.co.uk/2015/04/10-womens-books-in-translation-you-should-be-reading/ (2016-02-15)
    Open archived version from archive

  • A. M. Bakalar, Author at Litro Magazine
    Litro 126 Poland Letter from the Editor by A M Bakalar A poet s confession gruesome crime the perseverance of human spirit illicit sex family history and a glimpse at the underworld of cannabis production a collection of texts that will surprise and I hope delight you from a land of astonishing contradictions Read more Literature My Top Ten Nigerian Books by A M Bakalar I ve always been a huge fan of Nigerian literature A few years back I even went on a course to learn Igbo I started seriously reading Nigerian literature during my PhD studies on Nigerian and Zimbabwean contemporary fiction a course incidentally which I never finished because I wrote my own novel instead The brevity freshness and unique story telling style of Nigerian authors made me fall in love with the country s literature and taught me in turn to believe in myself and my own writing style Read more A M Bakalar The author has 7 posts published in Litro Magazine A M Bakalar was born and raised in Poland She lived in Germany France Sicily and Canada before she moved to the UK in 2004 Her first novel Madame Mephisto was among readers recommendations for the Guardian First Book Award She is the first Polish woman to publish a novel in English since Poland joined the EU in 2004 A M Bakalar lives with her partner a drum and bass musician in London She is currently at work on her second novel Website Twitter Facebook Contact Us General 44 0 20 3371 9971 info litro co uk Sales Advertising enquiries 44 0 20 3371 9971 Email Sales Magazine Editorial editor litro co uk All Online Editorial online litro co uk Book Reviews Author Interviews reviews litro co uk Film Arts Editorial arts litro

    Original URL path: http://www.litro.co.uk/author/ambakalar/ (2016-02-15)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Literature's Echo Chambers
    a conversation with one of the other performers For some reason I found it impossible to make eye contact or answer any of her questions coherently Then when it came to introducing my piece I forgot to thank Litro s editor for the opportunity and started rambling about my story being inspired by Tom Cruise in Vanilla Sky and a book I d read on Howard Hughes For days afterwards I felt utterly ashamed I replayed the evening over and over in my head The other writers seemed so confident so self assured to me They had a presence I felt I lacked They were professional engaging Thinking about it this now I still feel an intense embarrassment and yet the emotions I felt in those days after the event was nothing compared to how I often felt after writing workshops For me these classes were marred by an oppressive competitiveness which clashed with the uniformed display of comradery and community There is nothing wrong with this sort of one upmanship rivalry in theory Think of the Modernists Think of Tolstoy Dostoyevsky and others in Russian literatures Golden Age These writers challenged each other to greatness They provided one another with the incentive to produce ever better pieces of work I ve seen this happen in the classroom small groups driving each other on I ve seen evidence of the opposite to though Good writers stripped of individuality their judgement clouded by academia Their work becoming blandly polished intellectually submissive All their fire all their guts gone Of course I m not dismissing readings and workshops or any of the ways writers choose to broaden their horizons What I m asking what I m trying to figure out is whether this kind of literary collectivism is now the only way to thrive If immersing yourself in local scenes in criticism performance and study is the best way for all fledgling writers to flourish to find and maintain their voices A few years ago I wrote a small article about German painter Caspar David Friedrich perhaps the most influential of all of Germany s Romantic painters When he died Friedrich was penniless his work mired in obscurity Often criticised and misunderstood for an artistic stance that went against the trends and fashions of his age of enlightenment he once said I am not so weak as to submit to the demands of the age when they go against my convictions I spin a cocoon around myself let others do the same I shall leave it to time to show what will come of it a brilliant butterfly or maggot For modern writers this kind of idea is becoming increasingly difficult A balancing act is required between trying to get your work noticed and not losing yourself among those chasing the same dreams using the same tools responding to that same creative spark For writers to remain relevant to avoid an era of identikits I believe we have to face up to

    Original URL path: http://www.litro.co.uk/2016/01/67472/ (2016-02-15)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Reece Choules, Author at Litro Magazine
    Writing Elements of Style by Reece Choules What if we re all just writing the same stories though What separates say Hemingway from Faulkner Style People remember their styles Read more On Writing More Writing About Writing His White Envelope by Reece Choules Reece Choules is handed a white envelope while passing through Waterstones and wonders whether it might be the future of publishing Read more On Writing More Writing About Writing Q A with Dostoevsky by Reece Choules In his latest column Reece Choules calls upon the spirit of a literary hero for advice and inspiration Read more On Writing More Writing About Writing Some Names Are Bigger Than Others by Reece Choules In his latest column Reece Choules considers what makes some writers bigger than others and whether success can be categorised Read more Fiction Litro 139 No Such Luck Seen and Not Seen by Reece Choules Enduring the pain of loss Read more On Writing More Writing About Writing Performance by Reece Choules Reece Choules recalls a recent reading at Listen Softly London and urges the next generation of writers to stand up and claim their brave new world Read more On Writing More Writing About Writing The Words The New by Reece Choules In his latest column Reece Choules examines our notions of success and failure and our desire for the new Read more On Writing More Writing About Writing I m Still Here by Reece Choules Why write Reece Choules attempts to answer the question while watching a game of football Read more On Writing More Writing About Writing Shadow Boxing by Reece Choules Reece Choules returns with his More Writing About Writing column and the familiar problem of trying to balance the desire to write against the need for a social life Read more Travel Lifestyle I Remember Knuckling Down by Reece Choules Reece Choules remembers a youth of sticker books dead end jobs and second chances Read more On Writing More Writing About Writing You Can Write So What by Reece Choules So what did other writers do What did other writers say Some of them said write what you know Some of them said write what you can imagine Some of them planned every piece of work Some of them liked to just write seeing where the story went as they went along Some of them liked to listen to music The first in Reece Choules series on writing Read more Fiction Litro 130 Dystopia Staircase by Reece Choules What would you be willing to sacrifice in order to survive Read more Reece Choules The author has 17 posts published in Litro Magazine Reece Choules is a regular contributor to both Litro and The Culture Trip He graduated in 2012 with a BA in Creative Writing from London Southbank University He currently lives in Brixton while working on his first novel and divides his time between writing and selling second hand books He has previously been long listed for the Fish Prize

    Original URL path: http://www.litro.co.uk/author/reecechoules/ (2016-02-15)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Story Totems: The Stuff That Litters Writers' Desks
    though I wasn t consciously aware of its influence while writing the book Professor Jane Rogers whose tenth novel Conrad and Eleanor comes out in June 2016 and whose work has won multiple awards over a very prestigious career has this to say I have a number of beloved objects which I keep on the windowsill above my writing desk a little wooden frog my son brought back from Madagascar two tiny bronze women made by my sister Helen a clay echidna sent by my Mum from Australia a wooden snail whose curly shell is made from a violin given to my daughter when she was three by a good friend who is a violin maker I often stare at them while I m concentrating on writing I don t think any of them specifically connect me to any one of my stories it is more that I think of them as part of the landscape while I m writing and in a way they are talismans I have a lot of pebbles too I love the shapes and feel of smooth pebbles and I do pick them up and fill my pockets wherever I go The pebbles are probably the most useful while I m writing because there are a few favourites which I like to hold and turn in my hand as I m thinking and trying to move on with a story I suppose they are rather like worry beads only bigger Rogers says that though her short stories are often inspired by a single event or image or something she has read it s more common for a physical object from her life to take up residence in a story and make the story real for her For example when I was commissioned to write a story about Alan Turing Morphogenesis which appears in my collection Hitting Trees With Sticks I needed a scene between the teenage Turing and the boy he loved Chris I found a way of anchoring that in reality by having him present Chris with a fircone from his pocket using it to demonstrate a mathematical point The real fircone was sitting on my windowsill at the time and looking at it carefully and focussing on it gave me the way into the scene Rogers suspects as do I that most writers collect and use totemic objects in this way and do it quite instinctually Whether a totem is the original seed of a story or simply a method of drawing what is still not manifest out into the real world probably doesn t matter all that much Any tool a writer can use to inspire and create work is worth exploring About Niyati Keni Niyati Keni s first novel Esperanza Street was released by indie literary press Andotherstories in February 2015 Described by Kirkus Reviews as a luminous revelatory study on the connection between person and place Esperanza Street is set in a small town community in pre EDSA revolution Philippines

    Original URL path: http://www.litro.co.uk/2016/01/story-totems-stuff-litters-writers-desks/ (2016-02-15)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Niyati Keni, Author at Litro Magazine
    posts published in Litro Magazine Niyati Keni s first novel Esperanza Street was released by indie literary press Andotherstories in February 2015 Described by Kirkus Reviews as a luminous revelatory study on the connection between person and place Esperanza Street is set in a small town community in pre EDSA revolution Philippines Keni studied medicine in London and still practices part time as a physician She has travelled extensively within Asia She graduated with distinction from the MA Writing at Sheffield Hallam University in 2007 She is now based in the south east of England where she is working on her second novel Website Twitter Facebook Contact Us General 44 0 20 3371 9971 info litro co uk Sales Advertising enquiries 44 0 20 3371 9971 Email Sales Magazine Editorial editor litro co uk All Online Editorial online litro co uk Book Reviews Author Interviews reviews litro co uk Film Arts Editorial arts litro co uk Litro Lab Podcast litrolab litro co uk LitroTV litrotv litro co uk Litro Listings listings litro co uk Subscribe Stockists Submissions Advertising Our Team About Litro Litro Magazine is a free short stories and creative arts magazine in print and online Providing a place for readers writers and the broader creative community to discuss various aspects of literature arts and culture through features reviews non themed fiction interviews columns and more Perfect reading for those with busy lives When the first issue of Litro was published in April 2005 the main free paper for commuters and city dwellers was the morning Metro Since then many tabloid style free sheets have joined the field like the Metro these can be skim read and quickly discarded Litro is different our central aim has always been to provide commuters and city dwellers with an inspiring thought provoking

    Original URL path: http://www.litro.co.uk/author/niyatikeni/ (2016-02-15)
    Open archived version from archive



  •  


web-archive-uk.com, 2017-12-15