web-archive-uk.com


Web directory, archive
Search web-archive-uk.com:


Find domain in archive system:
web-archive-uk.com » UK » L » LOCALHISTORY.CO.UK

Total: 337

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • AMBRA BOOKS - Cornwall Antiquarian and Secondhand Books a selection from stock.
    near the coast opposite St Michael s Mount It seems probable that the site was at an early date occupied by an ecclesiastical edifice though there are few remains of an ancient character in the existing building Judging from the external appearance of the walls the oldest part is the transept which has the hagioscopie passage at the junction with the chancel resembling those in the churches of the Lizard district The oblique wall however forms a much Jess angle it is very rudely constructed and at the height of eighteen inches from the ground projects a little from the foundation One of the lower stones has marks of incised decoration of a very primitive character and probably formed part of a much earlier structure This oblique wall has no window as in the other examples but adjoining it in the eastern wall of the transept may be seen internally an obtusely pointed arch two feet in breadth and forming a recess which now extends only to the springing of the arch though there are traces that it once reached the floor and was either a Barrow aperture through or shallow recess 4 ft 8 in high in the wall

    Original URL path: http://www.localhistory.co.uk/ambra/txtco/co0002.htm (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive


  • AMBRA BOOKS - Cornwall Antiquarian and Secondhand Books a selection from stock.
    had property at Wishale in Yorkshire in which county his grandfather had founded and endowed the Priory of Halegh Park Owing to hostility to King John he was deprived of his land at Stratton in 1216 but on his return to his fealty King Henry III restored him his property in the following year Bartholomew Turet dying without issue his estates passed to his sister Lucy Turet and remained in her right in her widowhood and in a Halegh Park charter dated 1254 Sir Ralph de Albo Monasterio is stated to be Lucy Turet s son artd heir Accordingly in another Feoffee charter also undated it is Sir Ralph who grants the acre of Hele to Gilbert de Limaton the same Gilbert we may suppose as in Lucy Turet s charter It must then have been through his father s marriage with Lucy Turet that the original Sir Ralph Blanchminster came into possession of his knight s fee in Stratton We have thus succeeded in finding the Blanchminsters first as a Norman family of distinction in the Shropshire town of Album Monasterium coming by marriage with the Yorkshire heiress into possession of her manor in Stratton Beginning with Lucy Turet s son and heir four Blanchminster knights followed one another in the Stratton and Yorkshire estates The first Sir Ralph of whom we have cognizance comes on the scene in 1254 the date of the Halegh Park charter He showed his interest in Stratton by the unsuccessful attempt which he made by a suit at Launceston in the year 1263 to possess himself of the advowson of the church at Stratton This Sir Ralph is shown by an entry in the Episcopal Register at Exeter to have died previous to 1277 and the same entry shows that his son Sir Reginald had also died in early life previous to the date of the entry Sir Reginald s son and successor a second Sir Ralph lived to a considerable age and held an important place in the county In 1314 he was returned as Member for the county and in the same year he was summoned to the muster at Newcastle on Tyne to perform military service against the Scots The Blanchminsters had also acquired the lordship of Scilly possibly through the first Sir Ralph s marriage with his wife Isabella His grandson now built his castle on the island in 1302 but it is hardly likely that he would have made his residence off the mainland Some interesting stories are told of affairs on the island in the extracts from the records collected by Mr W B Goulding in his Blanch minster Charity Records from which we gather that the relations of the lords of the island with the King s officials were not always harmonious The lords of Binhamy must have had painful experience of the sea voyage from Efford to Land s End when from time to time their presence was required in Scilly The second Sir Ralph

    Original URL path: http://www.localhistory.co.uk/ambra/txtco/co0025.htm (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • AMBRA BOOKS - Cornwall Antiquarian and Secondhand Books a selection from stock.
    immediate difference once you cross the Tamar whether by road or across Brunei s famous suspension bridge at Saltash Both Cornwall and Devon not to mention part of Somerset were all comprehended in the territory of the people whom the Romans called Dumnonii It must be in Cornwall that almost island that Dumnonian factors and influences have finally after succesive pressures economic racial religious political been massed together whereas further into England they have become thinned out However this may be the range of Tors is a defensive chain to this day the granite masses that crown the hills of Devon and Cornwall have rather the look of constructions than chance formations of nature In Cornwall the Cheesewring near Liskeard is perhaps the most striking of these though many others like Row Tor and Brown Willy are scattered over the Bodmin Moors Penwith too can show Trencrom and the moors above the coast from St Ives to Zennor not forgetting the sinister Kenijack inland from St Just Structures they once were but all that now remains are a few stumps the abraded foundations of a power house where Sarron and Samothes royal colonists from Atlantis stored their subtle force To the sensitive these truncated towers still emanate the residue of a powerful radiation A carrek sans or holy rock is one that was anciently magnetised and until a few years ago if not more recently many of these whether Tors or not were the scene of stone worshipping rites It may be that granite more than another rock retains for aeons such psychic forces Only recently Dartmoor s Kes Tor was used as an altar in a sacramental celebration designed to absorb this force and distribute it by Christian means But Rocks Wells and Trees were originally the animist s

    Original URL path: http://www.localhistory.co.uk/ambra/txtco/co0023.htm (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive


  • AMBRA BOOKS - Cornwall Antiquarian and Secondhand Books a selection from stock.
    must have been the lady who decoyed away the poor young man Not far from St Just is the solitary dreary cairn known as Cairn Kenidzhek pronounced Kenidjack which means the hooting cairn so called from the unearthly noises which proceed from it on dark nights It enjoys a bad reputation as the haunt of witches Close under it lies a barren stretch of moorland the Gump over it the devil hunts at night poor lost souls he rides on the half starved horses turned out here to graze and is sure to overtake them at a particular stile It is often the scene of demon fights when one holds the lanthorn to give the others light and is also a great resort Legends of Parishes etc of the pixies Woe to the unhappy person who may be there after night fall they will lead him round and round and he may be hours before he manages to get out of the place away from his tormentors Here more than once fortunate persons have seen the small people too at their revels and their eyes have been dazzled by the si ht of their wonderful jewels but if they have ever managed to secrete a few behold next morning they were nothing but withered leaves or perhaps snail shells Sennen Cove was much frequented by mermaids This place was also resorted to by a remarkable spirit called the Hooper from the hooping or hooting sounds it was accustomed to make In old times according to tradition a compact cloud of mist often came in from over the sea when the weather was tby no means foggy and rested on the rocks called Cowloc thence it spread itself like a curtain of cloud quite across Sennen Cove By night a dull

    Original URL path: http://www.localhistory.co.uk/ambra/txtco/co0019.htm (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • AMBRA BOOKS - Cornwall Antiquarian and Secondhand Books a selection from stock.
    occasionally as a luxury yet its daily and habitual use is entirely unknown to the greater part of this class of people in the district This naturally leads to the subject of drinking more particularly so called or the use and abuse of spirituous and other strong liquors And I am happy to say that in this respect I can make a most favourable report of the inhabitants of the Landsend although I am not sure that their temperance is not in a considerable degree constrained At least the report made of them in this particular only a few years back by one of their native historians is extremely different from the representation of their present temperance which my experience enables me to give There is another poison among us says Polwhele more deleterious than all the lead that ever existed in the cider vessels of Devonshire and Cornwall The ardent spirits to which the Cornish vulgar are habituated young men and maidens old men and children pueri innuptceque puellae are unquestionably prejudicial to health and are often attended with fatality And in another place Among miners and others spirituous liquors are equally in repute p 107 The same complaint

    Original URL path: http://www.localhistory.co.uk/ambra/txtco/co0005.htm (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • AMBRA BOOKS - Cornwall Antiquarian and Secondhand Books a selection from stock.
    by one who bore the surname Blanchminster or de Albo Monasterio There is however a singular absence of evidence in favour of this hypothesis and the name appears to have been applied to the Charity only in comparatively recent times The earliest allusion to a Blanchminster as founder of the Charity which has come under the notice of the present writer s a statement by William Borlase in his Observations on the Antiquities Historical and Monumental of the County of Cornwall 1754 rr 307 8 In Book IV Chapter V headed Of the Roman Ways the following passage occurs I return now to the Causeway which runs a mile and half West of Stratton passing away at the head of Bude Haven towards Camelforcl I shall not trouble the reader with my conjectures about the farther tendency of this Way at present This is sufficient to shew that the Romans had a Way in the North of Cornwall but the people hereabouts have done by this Way as the vulgar and ignorant have dealt with the four great Ways in the other parts of the kingdom they have attributed it to the most famous man that tradition records to have liv d in these parts they say the Causeway was first made by one of the name de Albo Monasterio in English Blankminster a knight Templar whose effigies lyes in their Church who liv d in the time of Edward the First and gave lands to this Parish as appears by a deed of confirmation granted by Queen Elizabeth It is unfortunate that Borlase did not here express himself more clearly for his language is susceptible of two interpretations it may imply that the tradition was twofold that is to say that in accordance with popular belief not only did

    Original URL path: http://www.localhistory.co.uk/ambra/txtco/co0006.htm (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • AMBRA BOOKS - Cornwall Antiquarian and Secondhand Books a selection from stock.
    is not familiar and his miracles are recounted among the wonders of departed days The parish of St Neot lies in the deanery and hundred of West It is about eight miles north east from Lostwithiel the same distance south east from Bodmin five miles west north west from Liskeard which is its post town With the exception of Alternun this is the largest parish in the county containing 12 739 acres It lies on a small stream called St Neot s River a branch of the Fowey The Church whose windows form the subject of the following sketch is a handsome and spacious fabric built with square blocks of granite adorned with sculpture and embattled walls The south side is in a much more elegant style than the north which perhaps may be considered of an earlier date The pinnacles of the buttress between the south windows are elegant and ascending considerably above the parapet of the roof give the exterior an airy appearance The interior consists of a spacious nave and chancel which divides two aisles of similar dimensions and extends from the west door of the tower to the east window of the chancel 116 feet the

    Original URL path: http://www.localhistory.co.uk/ambra/txtco/co0004.htm (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • AMBRA BOOKS - Cornwall Antiquarian and Secondhand Books a selection from stock.
    commendable pride in the manner in which its ceremonies are conducted and the leading townspeople here still take their proper part in the dance and in other ways lend to the proceedings that measure of support which is so sadly lacking at Padstow Despite this the crowds who now throng the pleasant old world streets of Helston on Furry day are for the most part alien crowds brought there in motor coaches from neighbouring Resorts and come only to gaze in wonder or amusement at a quaint old ceremony of whose significance they know little and probably care less Whilst therefore year by year the festival attracts onlookers in ever increasing numbers its underlying purpose the bringing in of the summer and the may O has faded more and more into the background just as the green boughs which once decked the doorways as a symbol of the approach of summer have given way to the flags and bunting with which the streets are now brightened up to please the money spending visitors The very name by which the festival is now known shows that this desire to improve upon the original is no new thing During the latter part of the eighteenth century the influence of certain classi calists who were seeking to endow almost every English custom with a Greek or Roman origin was instrumental in bringing about a change in the name Furry to that of Flora from the supposed connection of the festival itself with the Roman feast of Floralia By what means the Romans who so far as is known were never properly established in Cornwall and beyond a few milestones and one or two possible camps have left no trace of their invasion here should have so successfully imposed this single festival upon the

    Original URL path: http://www.localhistory.co.uk/ambra/txtco/co0026.htm (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive



  •  


web-archive-uk.com, 2017-12-15