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  • AMBRA BOOKS - Devon Antiquarian and Secondhand Books a selection from stock.
    near Ashbrittle Here they are lost and are apparently represented by the chert bands so intimately associated with the limestones of Westleigh and Holcombe Rogus The same beds crop out above the southern limestones and have been traced from the Cornish coast past Laun ceston round the northern edge of Dartmoor to the neighbourhood of Chudleigh When in 1893 Dr Teall and Mr Howard Fox discovered the Radiolarian origin of the chert at Mullion Island the idea suggested itself to many that the Coddon Hill and other chert beds might possibly have been formed in a similar way so that when in 1895 an exhaustive paper on these beds was read before the Geological Society by Mr Fox and Dr G J Hinde Devonshire geologists were not surprised to learn that it was proved that these basement beds of the Culm repeated the deep sea phenomenon of the earlier date We are now in a position to attempt a reconstruction We may regard the massive limestones of the Midlands as the solidified ooze of a moderately deep sea It will be remembered that while there was land where the Carboniferous Limestone was subsequently deposited there was open sea over Devon

    Original URL path: http://www.localhistory.co.uk/ambra/txtde/de0011.htm (2016-02-18)
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  • AMBRA BOOKS - Devon Antiquarian and Secondhand Books a selection from stock.
    hollowed out to within a few r ches of the top the upper edge being bevelled the surface n which the socket to receive the cross is cut is thus reduced to a square of fifteen inches All this however as well as the shaft of the cross itself is of comparatively modern date compared to the head which it is plainly to be seen is of some considerable antiquity and it is a matter for congratulate on that so much care has been taken to preserve this memorial of the old days The shaft is thirteen inches square it the bottom and of tapering form It is nearly six feet high and around the top is a fillet The head which has been carefully fixed rises twenty eight inches above this fillet and in addition to having been broken of from its original shaft it has also sustained other injuries Remains of much ornamentation in the angles of this cross prove it to have been a very handsome one The arms and top of the head are octagonal in shape Bickleigh Church was re built in 1838 by Sir Ralph Lopes of Maristowe the patron of the living In the old edifice was a monument to the memory of Nicholas Slanning who was milled in a duel with John afterwards Sir John Fitz in 1599 Portions of this monument which was in a very dilapidated condition were preserved at the time the church was rebuilt but previous to its demolition a drawing of it with a copy of the inscriptions it bore was made by the Rev W I Coppard of Plympton The tower is ancient and is surmounted by large crocketted pinnacles and possesses a corner turret From Bickleigh we shall take the road which leads into the

    Original URL path: http://www.localhistory.co.uk/ambra/txtde/de0005.htm (2016-02-18)
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  • AMBRA BOOKS - Devon Antiquarian and Secondhand Books a selection from stock.
    or combes some of which present peculiar features and reveal a curious history Two of these combes drain westward and opem into the Fleet valley one empties itself at the present time into Ansteys Cove and the last or Ilsham valley opens directly into Torbay The first of these vales is Ellacombe which is an oval basin shaped depression lying betweeii Plainmoor on the north Warberry Hill on the south and a spur of this hill on the east From the inward slopes of these hills the rainfall is directed into the hollow of Ellacowbe the eastern part of which has a retentive subsoil of ehaly slate There is also a strong spring at the bottom of the valley opposite the Ellacombe Brewery and all the water issuing from this is now conducted to the Brewery though formerly it ran freely down the valley Westward there is a tract of limestone see map Fig 9 and through this the watercourse passes along the depression which runs between Princes Road and Alexandra Road but at the present time the actual watercourse is a covered drain If you require this work and cannot find a copy on the site DEVON Selection of

    Original URL path: http://www.localhistory.co.uk/ambra/txtDE/de0002.htm (2016-02-18)
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  • AMBRA BOOKS - Devon Antiquarian and Secondhand Books a selection from stock.
    of the little meadow beyond and the groups of fern and wild flower which enrich this lovely spot Between the mill and Holy Street House we shall notice built into the wall on the left the remains of the cross which once stood under a tree in Chagford market place I have seen an octagonal basin under a pump at the back of a house in the town which I was told represented the base of this cross but Mr Ormerod states that this trough belonged to another market cross formerly a very handsome specimen and which may be now seen in a mutilated condition at Way Barton That at Holy Street has nothing remarkable about it except an incised cross between the arms Passing Holy Street House a handsome edifice in the Tudor style snugly placed under rising ground we soon again diverge to inspect a singular mass of rock or rather gigantic boulder known as the Puggie Stone probably the Pixy Stone Rowe tells us that there is a rock basin on the top but for this we cannot personally vouch as it is unscaleable except by means of a ladder This isolated stone is certainly the largest

    Original URL path: http://www.localhistory.co.uk/ambra/txtde/de0009.htm (2016-02-18)
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  • AMBRA BOOKS - DORSET Antiquarian and Secondhand Books a selection from stock.
    unlike any other The downs at Swanage had a fragrance which came somewhere near it but breezes from the neighbouring places on the coast outside Purbeck Ringstead Osmington or Weymouth resembled it not at all What was the essence of that delectable air peculiar to the valley at all seasons of the year The scents of beans in flower of sea weed haygrass clover burning couch of storm bruised leaves and new turned earth of gorse in blossom sun dried grass and many other ingredients came and departed with the changing year but the underlying redolence of Tyneham remained the same throughout the months familiar to the valley dweller as the basic smell of smoke and petrol is to the townsman It did in fact intensify the scent of Tyneham flowers as Tyneham soil or air intensified the brilliance of their colours How often have I hopefully set plants or seeds from Tyneham in my urban garden only to meet with disappointment when the poor pale travesties of their Purbeck kinsfolk came into flower The traveller along the ridge as far as Steeple Cross looked out to the north across the dark expanse of Hardy s Egdon Heath from the creeks and islets of Poole Harbour to the monument on Blagdon and past the highlands of North Dorset to where Alfred s Tower stands sentinel at the meeting place of Dorset Somerset and Wiltshire The view of this great sweep of open country has become well known and popular and it is beautiful in its changing aspects at each season of the year But we returning home had eyes for the valley only the valley sea and landlocked with its unsymmetric pattern of green fields inlaid with grey stone walls and quick set hedges its hanging woods and belts and coppices its little groups of trees encircling cottages and farms each neatly fitting piece of the intricate design familiar to us as the patterns of the carpets in our rooms Eastwards the double line of hills swept back in parallel curves to Corfe the southern ridge between valley and sea crowned five miles away by the tower of Street s tall church at Kingston A dip in the ridge showed Smedmore s grey facade clear cut against shadowy woods and in the nearer valley the sturdy tower of Steeple Church lay girdled by its trees When I was young the downland still possessed a thriving populace of sheep and all day long the sheep bells chimed and echoed to and fro between the hills The House was out of sight from the Wareham road lying beyond a grassy ridge of the valley floor and sheltered by its plantings but the Great Wood and the West Plantation close behind the House were plain to view as they climbed the hillside almost to the jagged and tilted edge of Gadcliff Not until travellers were halfway down the Cowleaze Knap with only a couple of hundred yards to go did a glimpse of

    Original URL path: http://www.localhistory.co.uk/ambra/txtdo/do0004.htm (2016-02-18)
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  • AMBRA BOOKS - DORSET Antiquarian and Secondhand Books a selection from stock.
    simplicity and we may suppose that not a few in the parish shared the convictions of the sufferers for conscience sake The house of James Madgwick at Lytchett Minster was licensed for Presbyterian worship July 1719 He was probably the brother of William Madgwick of Poole by whom several of his children were baptized but whether he officiated as minister we have no evidence to show A building belonging to the dwelling house of Elizabeth Gage was certified for religious worship 3rd April 1733 and the dwelling house of John Stanley i5th July 1735 ut we know not by whom the services were conducted In the early part of the last century certain parents at Lytchett named Taylor Reeves and Cellar had their children baptized by Mr Madgwick of Poole and later on 1740 82 other parents named Brewer H and J Coward R T and A Knapp Reeks Tailor J and H Best Smith Glover and Cole availed themselves of the services of Mr Simon Reader of Wareham In the year 1769 the Rev E Ashburner M A of Poole came out to preach the gospel in the house of Ann Frankland which was licensed 10th January 1769 and continued to conduct a service on Monday evenings for 20 years When the house previously in use was no longer available Mr Crue a member of the Poole congregation bought Frankland s farm and erected a small building near the farm house for dissenting worship which was opened 1819 Here the Rev T Durant of Poole preached in the evening once a week and friends from Poole took the Sunday services About this time a congregation met at Organford in a building now converted into a cottage Mr Swaffield and others preaching on the Sunday and the ministers of Wareham

    Original URL path: http://www.localhistory.co.uk/ambra/txtdo/do0003.htm (2016-02-18)
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  • AMBRA BOOKS - DORSET Antiquarian and Secondhand Books a selection from stock.
    more recent than the Chalk which occur nowhere else in Dorset It is a very beautiful piece of country with commons and heaths gorse and Scotch fir trees but it is in a sense alien to the scenery of the rest of the county and geologically it belongs to Hampshire rather than to Dorset From beneath this trough the Chalk rises with a steady lift to the northwest until between the south western corner of Salisbury Plain and Cheddington it terminates abruptly in a long crescent shaped escarpment The rocks which rise from beneath the foot of the Chalk hills belong to a different and older system altogether They lie in beds of alternating limestone clay or sand and form a broad belt of undulating country which extends north westward into Somerset to the foot of the Mendip and Polden Hills fragments of lands already immeasurably ancient long before these Dorset rocks had any existence The part of this borderland country I am describing lies between the Vale of Sparkford on the north the River Parret on the west and the Chalk Downs on the south and east Sherborne lies in a hollow of the hills very near the heart

    Original URL path: http://www.localhistory.co.uk/ambra/txtdo/do0010.htm (2016-02-18)
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  • AMBRA BOOKS - DORSET Antiquarian and Secondhand Books a selection from stock.
    dip slope of the Oolite into the valley of the River Yeo where Sherborne lies hidden under the lee of the hill side Before descending and being hemmed in by the valley sides the view southward from this high ground north of the town is for historical reasons well worthy of attention Though not so open or so striking as the other view northward over the Vale of Somerset this to the south is very fair to look upon and full of significance for it commands that north west corner of Dorset where lay the broad estates which formed the Hundred and Manor of the Bishops of Sherborne and afterwards of the mediaeval Bishops of Salisbury The furthest hills which line the southern horizon are the Dorset Downs part of the great chalk plateau of Southern England They may be known by their bare smooth contours and by the gleam of an open chalk quarry on the flank of High Stoy The nearer range in the middle distance with its harder outline its shaggy woods and its chevaux de frise of tall forest trees is the escarpment of the Forest Marble and Fuller s Earth Beds which forms the south side of the valley overlooking the left bank of the River Yeo Between these two ranges out of sight lies the broad vale of the Oxford Clay over which the western extension of Blackmore Forest spreads a mantle of virgin woodland and rough pasture where the roe deer still run wild within the screen of the thicker coverts It is in and around this forest area that many of the scattered hamlets and villages lie which owed suit to the bishop s Hundred Court in Sherborne Long Burton Holnest Wootton Purse and Bishops Caundle Alweston Haydon Lilling ton Lydlinch Down and Marsh And nearer Sherborne within the girdle of the Forest Marble hills lie six other members of the Out Hundred Bradford Abbas Thornford Oborne Pinford Over and Nether Compton Last and furthest of the eighteen tithings belonging to the bishop s Out Hundred Up Cerne and Alton Pancras each at the head of a chalk stream tributaries to the River Frome lie out of sight on the southern slopes of the Downs Besides these widely scattered country tithings there was the more compact unit of the Manor of Sherborne or as it is sometimes called the In Hundred1 It stood in somewhat closer personal relationship to the bishop and was confined to that portion of his estate that lay within the valley of the Yeo and had its centre in the town It consisted in 1405 the date of the earliest extant Court Roll of the Hundred in which these six tithings appear by name of Abbot s Fee Eastbury Westbury Houndstreet Over and Nether Combe These six tithings owed suit to the court of the manor but were not thereby freed from attendance at the superior court of the bishop s Hundred Castleton and Newland now integral parts

    Original URL path: http://www.localhistory.co.uk/ambra/txtdo/do0005.htm (2016-02-18)
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