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  • AMBRA BOOKS - DORSET Antiquarian and Secondhand Books a selection from stock.
    later but who married her or what became of her was not found The family appear to have had property including Bower Chalke on the southern borders of Wilts and Heralds Visitations in the time of Edward III seem to have found them there Hutchins s History of Dorset considers we are on more solid ground in John Bower in Henry VI s reign and this John s grandson held lands in Lower Donhead to which the first Thomas Bower in the reign of James I added land in East Orchard where he was buried This said Thomas married four times and left an enormous family and one of his wives possessed the unusual name of Worbarrow It is quaintly recorded that he was a man of great means but was ruled by his wives and became weak in his estate a sort of thing that has happened before and since One of the sons is thus described Being a famous boy at Oxford and greatly learned in Greek and Hebrew he died young so it seems to be darkly insinuated that he died of too much Greek and Hebrew which was probably an unusual cause of mortality among country

    Original URL path: http://www.localhistory.co.uk/ambra/txtdo/do0006.htm (2016-02-18)
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  • AMBRA BOOKS - DORSET Antiquarian and Secondhand Books a selection from stock.
    beach and downs their summer resort This is Lulworth s sole point of contact with a place not otherwise to be mentioned in the same breath with it Brighton In all other respects no two places could be so unlike but in their treeless shadeless condition they are fellows There is scarce a tree nearer than a mile away and no considerable number closer than Lulworth Castle The immense semicircle of grassed chalk downs in whose lap the village of West Lulworth lies grows nothing not very nutritious sheep bite the road by wind swept hedges the country folk call the great which shuts the sea pool of Lulworth on the east while as Bindon it is known to the maps Bindon Hill obtains its name from the hollow beneath it having been the original site of Bindon Abbey before it waxed rich and migrated to the more fertile country inland by the green pastures and still waters of the river Frome and the old Gothic buildings of the so called Little Bindon Abbey now put to secular farming use are still to be seen on that original foothold It is from this point that one obtains one of the less hackneyed and most impressive views of the Cove with the Gibraltar like mass of the western headland Further sample text PORTLAND CASTLE FORTUNE S WELL CHESIL VILLAGE The railway to Portland ends at Chesilton at the very foot and margin of the craggy Isle just beyond the muddy shallow called the Mere inside the point where Portland Castle stands The Mere is some day to be a torpedo boat harbour a kind of hornet s nest for that foreign foe who may seek at any time to put his hand in here The castle itself is the picturesque survival of a range of low buildings built by Henry the Eighth for the protection of the harbour against an invader a part in which it was to be aided by Sandsfoot Castle on the mainland Henry coming back from France where on the famous Field of the Cloth of Gold he had embraced his dear cousin and trusty ally the King of France on both cheeks and the two had vowed friendship immedi ately busied himself in protecting the whole southern coast of England with forts lest his dear friend should seek to surprise him Kings who should be the best judges of kingly protestations of good faith do not trust one another and when alliances are made prepare to fight or defend themselves against their allies King Henry s castles were in the reign of his daughter Queen Elizabeth hurriedly garrisoned against the Spanish Armada but had no occasion to prove their worth but in the troubled times of King Charles they were taken and retaken by foes whom the builder of them had certainly never contemplated Civil war did not come within King Henry s calculations In the beginning of that struggle in 1643 the Parliament men seized

    Original URL path: http://www.localhistory.co.uk/ambra/txtdo/do0002.htm (2016-02-18)
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  • AMBRA BOOKS - DORSET Antiquarian and Secondhand Books a selection from stock.
    and cover and silver salver being only a small common waiter the cup also too small for the sacred purpose and exceedingly old were disposed of towards the purchase of the following articles presented to the Parish Church of Bradford Peverell by Robert Pattison Esqr i Large Flagon i Large Salver 2 Chalices Middleton Onslow Rector A Chalice Paten and Flagon a thank offering to the Church bearing the sacred monogram and inscribed D D Hastings B Middleton A S 1885 The two pewter plates mentioned above no longer in use are inscribed In usum Ecclesiae Bradford Peverel 1707 and 1713 BROADMAYNE with WEST KNIGHTON A plated service consisting of Chalice Paten and Flagon all inscribed with the sacred monogram WEST KNIGHTON An Elizabethan Chalice and Paten cover bearing the usual four hall marks the date year being 1572 Maker s mark H W with a pellet above and below all within a quatrefoil On the cover is inscribed the date 1573 The bowl of the cup is ornamented with a single band of intersecting foliated strap work on the base is the egg and tongue moulding Paten inscribed with the sacred monogram and Parish of West Knighton A D

    Original URL path: http://www.localhistory.co.uk/ambra/txtdo/do0007.htm (2016-02-18)
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  • AMBRA BOOKS - GLOUCESTERSHIRE Antiquarian and Secondhand Books a selection from stock.
    not remarkable for its beauty at least it is remarkable for its bells containing as it does three mediaeval specimens each with the Gothic letter ORA PRO NOBIS preceded by the name of a saint Mary the Virgin Mary Magdalene and John the Baptist respectively These bells are considered to originate from the foundry of Robert Hendly of Gloucester early fifteenth century maker of considerable repute whose bells are found also at Farmington Lower Slaughter and Sevenhampton That extensive Perpendicular alterations were made to the or Norman building is evident from the late and uninteresting features en south side of the nave while in comparatively modern times the chancel was completely rebuilt and a vestry added The point of interest externally is the highly decorative north aisle erected towards the end of the fiftee century when the church was still attached to Osney as indicated by Abbey arms azure two bends or which appear on one of the shields detail is exceedingly rich especially as regards the number and variety of the gargoyles and bosses while the north east buttress contains an elaborate niche capped by a pinnacle of elaborate design The entrance to the porch was rebuilt in 1636 but internally the porch has good Perpendicular groining though this must be a replacement for vaulting shafts are early Decorated with characteristic bell shaped capit There is a stoup behind the entrance and in the east wall a niche has a unique projecting ledge pierced with holes which Mr Keyser thinks were for insertion of candles the hot air being carried away by a kind of flue in back of the niche The doorway to the nave is Transitional Norman and the door it retains a pair of mediaeval C shaped hinges also a closing ring a lock pk and

    Original URL path: http://www.localhistory.co.uk/ambra/txtgl/gl0006.htm (2016-02-18)
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  • AMBRA BOOKS - GLOUCESTERSHIRE Antiquarian and Secondhand Books a selection from stock.
    scientific botanical names may be there is in them a fund of instruction and interest which will well repay the labour spent upon them That there must be such names joined or not with popular English names is an absolute necessity in botany as in every other science for the first necessity for science says Professor Earle was to know the objects and to know them by their names In botany these names are certainly very often long and cumbrous uncouth and unclassical and to many who use them they can convey no meaning at all and I have often listened with wonder to men and women with no classical education whatever and without the slightest knowledge of Greek or Latin using a multitude of these long words squipedalia verba using them accurately und in many cases with a real knowledge of their meaning though with no knowledge of their derivation in such cases their use of these words shows a wonderful power of memory which is no way helped by tracing the fitness of the name for the plant There is now and there always has been a desire to use for plants popular names only and the long scientific names have been mercilessly held up to ridicule and have given occasion for many harmless jokes Yet it is not easy to see why botany should have been so specially singled out for abuse and ridicule of its scientific names except that perhaps the study of gardening and botany is the most popular of the sciences and is followed up by a larger number of half educated people Rocks and stones butterflies and moths and especially birds are as much common objects of the country as trees and flowers and the different sciences of geology entomology and ornithology make

    Original URL path: http://www.localhistory.co.uk/ambra/txtgl/gl0005.htm (2016-02-18)
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  • AMBRA BOOKS - GLOUCESTERSHIRE Antiquarian and Secondhand Books a selection from stock.
    iconic in the year 1738 erected an adjoining pump room with a dome over the well ornamented with a pidgeon at each corner and planted the trees of the upper and lower parades that now form a towering shade against a vertical sun and one of the most beautiful walks in the kingdom This Spa soon attracted the attention of medical men who contributed by their writings to bring the water into notice but they differed considerably in their accounts of its impregnations Dr Short examining the different wells of Britain in the year 1740 praised it highly as an excellent purging chalybeate taken in doses from one to three pints and observed that soon after its establishment it had been recommended by Doctors Baird and Greville C H Senkenberg from his experiments made at London in the year 1741 denied that it had any chalybeate properties Dr Lucas remarked that it contained iron which invigorated the habit at the time it proved purgative and that old men drank it by the quart Dr Rutty obtained 528 grains of solid matter from a gallon of water and observed that it contained sulphur together with iron and that the dose was

    Original URL path: http://www.localhistory.co.uk/ambra/txtgl/gl0002.htm (2016-02-18)
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  • AMBRA BOOKS - GLOUCESTERSHIRE Antiquarian and Secondhand Books a selection from stock.
    metal very short and brittle To remedy this inconvenience they main u n of another material which they call cinder it being nothing else but the refuse the ore after the molting hath been extracted which being melted with the oilier in duo quantity gives it that excellent temper of toughness for which Ibis iron is preferred before any oilier that is brought from foreign parts After they have provided their ore their first work is to calcine it which is done in kilns much after the fashion of our ordinary lime kilns these they fill up to the top with coal and ore untill it be full and so putting fire to the bottom they let it burn till the coal be wasted and then renew the kilnes with fresh ore and coal This is done without any infusion of mettal and serves to consume the more drossy part of the ore and to make it fryable supplying the beating and washing which are to no other mettals from hence they curry it lo their furnaces which are built of brick and stone about 24 foot square on the outside and near 30 foot in hight within and not above 8 or 10 foot over where it is widest which is about tho middle the top and bottom having a narrow compass much like the form of an egg Behind the furnace are placed two high pair of bellows whose noses meet at a little hole near the bottom these are compressed together by certain buttons placed on the axis of a very large wheel which is turned round by water in the manner of an over shot mill As soon as these buttons are slid oil the bellows arc raised again by a counterpoise of weights whereby they

    Original URL path: http://www.localhistory.co.uk/ambra/txtgl/gl0001.htm (2016-02-18)
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  • AMBRA BOOKS - GLOUCESTERSHIRE Antiquarian and Secondhand Books a selection from stock.
    thousand years ago but I suspect that even under Rome he mined the iron measures as a free man His most extensive workings arc to be seen along the western edge of the forest most noticeably between Lyclney Park and Bream in the Scowles near Coleford and again in the north eastern corner of the forest on Wigpool It is significant that the most prominent feature of the small Roman settlement on the southernmost tip of the iron measure is the Roman temple erected not to a Latin god but to Nodens the river god of the Silurcs Apart from this there is little sign of Roman interference with the forest other than the paved road that ran from Newerne Lydney to Mitcheldean whose all weather causeway for the transport of mineral is still to be found in the forest This is one of the few original surfaces of Roman road north of the Appian Way but unfortunately though part of it remains some has recently lost its identity under a coat of tar and pebbles to the north of Blackpool Bridge This road passes the estiges of a camp in the village of Soudley overlooking the pond The only

    Original URL path: http://www.localhistory.co.uk/ambra/txtgl/gl0009.htm (2016-02-18)
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