web-archive-uk.com


Web directory, archive
Search web-archive-uk.com:


Find domain in archive system:
web-archive-uk.com » UK » L » LOCALHISTORY.CO.UK

Total: 337

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • AMBRA BOOKS - WILTSHIRE Antiquarian and Secondhand Books a selection from stock.
    Stevens Phelps c names not yet forgotten in the town bear ample testimony to the success that in the latter portion of the last century attended the spirit and industry of the clothiers of Bradford Other names of interest or which still occur in the town may be found in the lists of jurymen at the local courts or of the manorial officers thus in 1747 Daniel Clutterbuck steward of the manor Thos Saunders bailiff in 1765 Edward Orpin coroner of the market the subject of Gainsborough s famous picture of The Parish Clerk also Deverell Timbrell Dory Gingell Moore Spencer Gaisford Eudman Gerrish Renison Sartain Spender Pitman In 1747 the tithingman for Holt was Thomas Tartanweaver was this a new surname coined for a Scotch immigrant and was tartan popular here while forbidden in the Highlands In the same year we find also the following still extant names on the Roll of the Borough viz Batchelor Batten Bendal Blanchard Baily Beverstock Bull Burgess Burcombe Coles Crook Edwards Ellet Elliot Ferris Huntley Kemp Kite Miles Milsom Morris Price Pearce Porch Siiby Skrine Sparks Stillman Tucker Then came the introduction of machinery and with it the Factory System Then the weavers and others employed in the manufacture of cloth instead of plying their craft as heretofore in their own cottages were collected into large buildings many of them erected for the special purpose of receiving them At the commencement of this century no less than thirty two of these were at work in our town every building in fact which could be converted to the purpose being made one of these hives of industry Even the Chapel of our Lady on Tory could not escape such a doom in an age when utility so far as money making was concerned was

    Original URL path: http://www.localhistory.co.uk/ambra/txtwi/wi0001.htm (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive


  • AMBRA BOOKS - WILTSHIRE Antiquarian and Secondhand Books a selection from stock.
    amid a tumult of excitement Two men entered the ring stripped to the waist and commenced a most fearful onslaught on each other Blood soon commenced to flow and egged on to revenge by the partizans each poor wretch became maddened with rage The sight drove me from the spot in terror to my home This was no uncommon occurrence in those days Wroughton Feast AT Wroughton Feast an annual festivity that lasted a whole week it was the custom for many years for the champion gip to fight the best man who could be produced for a purse of gold The venue was the paddock at the back of the Three Tuns tavern where the usual paraphernalia of fairs used to congregate in full force The Feast always took place in the summer at a time which included a week of our school holidays I was not more than seven or eight years of age when without my parents consent I wandered over to Wroughton and at the Feast witnessed another encounter similar to that I had seen in Swindon This annual event always commenced on a Sunday evening by friends and neighbours from Swindon Wroughton and neighbouring villages

    Original URL path: http://www.localhistory.co.uk/ambra/txtwi/wi0005.htm (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • AMBRA BOOKS - WILTSHIRE Antiquarian and Secondhand Books a selection from stock.
    Chapel of St Katherine in the same burying ground to hold as part of his Manor of Ludgershall This grant included a number of tenements within the City one called The Hermitage in Church Street three houses near the Poultry Cross and twenty seven gardens in various parts Prom the grant were excepted the parish Churches of St Edmund and St Martin but it included the advowsons of St Edmund St Martin and several churches outside Salisbury The Chapel of St Katherine later came into the possession of St Edmund s parish and was converted into a Vestry In after years a room was built above the vestry and used as a school until 1860 when the present parochial schools were erected In many old deeds relating to ancient property in the City including those of the Shoemakers Hall they are described as part of St Barbe s lands In 1549 the whole estate with the advowsons of St Edmund s and St Martin s was transferred by William and Thomas St Barbe to John Beckingham a merchant of Salisbury who was holder of a lease in possession granted by the last provost For some years disputes arose between the owners of the College and the Vestry of St Edmund s respecting the ownership of the trees and herbage in the Churchyard The 1551 Churchwarden s book has the following entry Item delyvered to Mr Hopper our atorny in the lawe XXs agenste John Beckynghame for takeyng down ye tres in ye Chyrchyerd by ye sayd Beckynghame A later entry shows that the action of the Churchwardens failed In 1562 John Lowe was presented with the living of St Edmund s John Beckenham Patron In 1575 Henry Beckingham son of John Beckenham sold the College house and the property connected

    Original URL path: http://www.localhistory.co.uk/ambra/txtwi/wi0004.htm (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive


  • AMBRA BOOKS - LOCAL HISTORY - Antiquarian and Secondhand Books a selection from stock.
    neighbourhood so inviting that though our stream will not water these spots we must consider Lyme Charmouth Uplyme and Monkton Wylde as belonging to the region of the Axe Neither are the various parishes through which our river and its branches and streamlets flow devoid of great beauty The fine open bay of Seaton with Haven cliff on the one side and the perpendicular white chalk rocks of Beer on the other are points of great attraction As we advance onward the view of Colyton Church with its noble tower raising its head in a lovely vale arrest the eye and charm the beholder As the stream winds its bending course further still the rich luxuriant meadows near Axminster with the prospect of Cloak ham house and the Dalwood and Stockland hills seem to tell the traveller a tale that he is treading on enchanted ground Two miles to the east is Trinity hill whence we behold the clear blue waters of the sea the river gliding through the vale a diversified prospect of hills and dales with a distant and sometimes clear view of Heytor in the forest of Dartmoor As we reach nearer the source of the Axe

    Original URL path: http://www.localhistory.co.uk/ambra/txtGE/ge0001.htm (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • AMBRA BOOKS - LOCAL HISTORY - Antiquarian and Secondhand Books a selection from stock.
    in winter the sea bursts over the rock in such a manner as to render all attempts to carry on mining operations unavailing Such were the difficulties which a poor individual had to surmount whose whole capital perhaps was not 10 As the work could be prosecuted only during the short period of time when the rock appeared above water a period which was still further abridged by the necessity of previously emptying the excavation three summers were consumed in sinking the pump shaft a work of mere bodily labour The use of machinery then became practicable and a frame of boards being applied to the mouth of the shaft it was cemented to the rock by pitch and oakum made water tight in the same way and carried up to a sufficient height above the highest spring tide To support this boarded turret which was 20 feet high above the rock and 2 feet i inch square against the violence of the surge eight stout bars of iron were applied in an inclined direction to its sides four of them below and four of an extraordinary length and thickness above A platform of boards was then lashed round the top of the turret supported by four poles which were firmly connected with these rods Lastly upon this platform was fixed a winze for four men It was thought that the miners would thus be enabled to pursue their operations at all times even during the winter months whenever the weather was not particularly unfavourable but as soon as the excavation was carried to some extent in a lateral direction this was found to be impossible for the sea water penetrated through the fissures of the rock and in proportion as the workings became enlarged the labour of raising the

    Original URL path: http://www.localhistory.co.uk/ambra/txtGE/ge0010.htm (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • AMBRA BOOKS - LOCAL HISTORY - Antiquarian and Secondhand Books a selection from stock.
    which Lord Strafford played excellently well to a dandy frequenting the bull fights and to the Grand Vizier of the King of Dahomey Regarded however as an English family is most frequently met with in the south and weft of this island and few parish registers in the counties of Hereford Gloucester Wilts and Dorset can be without presenting us with examples It is spelt in many ways varying from the extended form of Mayhowe to that of Mao and often as it will presently appear down and reduced to May by the loss of its concluding syllable One lesson however is taught by this variety and diversity viz the identity of Mayhew and Mayo and from this from this consideration a ray of light is thrown upon the derivation name The common supposition that the name takes its origin from the Irish town must be laid aside And indeed the name appears to be as rare in Ireland as it is in England for to take a single illustration while thirty four persons of the name of Mayo and eight or more of Mayhew graduated at Oxford between 1659 and 1868 no person so called is to be found

    Original URL path: http://www.localhistory.co.uk/ambra/txtge/ge0003.htm (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • AMBRA BOOKS - LOCAL HISTORY - Antiquarian and Secondhand Books a selection from stock.
    the south eastern extremity of the parish may be seen the famous reservoirs of the Bristol Water Works Company These miniature lakes of which there are three with their glittering surfaces lying in the hollow and encompassed by picturesque surroundings form a pleasant variety to the scene The first reservoir was constructed in 1868 and the third and largest in 1897 and when full are capable of containing 850 millions of gallons of water The first authentic account relating to Barrow Gurney appears to be derived from Domesday in which it is described as Berve and included in the property of the Bishop of Coutances who held a life interest in numerous other estates in the neighbourhood Nigel holds of the Bishop of Coutances Berve Edric held it in the time of King Edward and gelded for 10 hides Upon the death of the Bishop the manor reverted to the Crown and was granted by Rufus to Robert Fitz Harding the progenitor of the Lords of Berkeley Robert Fitz Harding died in 1170 He left five sons and two daughters Robert the fourth son was Lord of Beverstone Kingsweston English combe and Barrow He married first Hawisia daughter of Robert de Gournay by whom he had a daughter Eva His second wife was Alice daughter of Robert de Gaunt by whom he had a son who took his mother s name of Gaunt He founded the Hospital of St Mark s and the Gaunts Chapel now the Lord Mayor s Chapel Bristol Upon his death the manor of Barrow reverted to his half sister Eva who became a great heiress and married Thomas de Harp tree Lord of Farrington and Harptree Thomas de Harptree left a son Robert who took the name of Gournay He died in 1269 leaving two

    Original URL path: http://www.localhistory.co.uk/ambra/txtge/ge0008.htm (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • AMBRA BOOKS - LOCAL HISTORY - Antiquarian and Secondhand Books a selection from stock.
    Lord Breherval who had estates in Yvery in Normandy with his three sons came to England with the Conqueror After the Battle of Hastings Lord Breherval probably on account of his age returned to his home where he entered the Abbey of Bee and ended his days there His three sons Aselin Gouel and William remained in England Aselin who in consequence of his fierce disposition was surnamed Lupus the Wolf held the manor of East Harptree until 1120 and John his youngest son subsequently became Lord of Harptree He it was probably who erected the famous Castle of Richmont the remains of which are to be seen on the side of the hill not far from the village The powerful Barons de Harptree made it their home for generations and in the year 1138 Sir William de Harptree who had vigorously espoused the cause of the Empress Maud garrisoned his castle in her defence King Stephen who at that time was hurrying hither and thither endeavouring to quell the disturbances throughout the country after having paid a visit to Bristol marched to East Harptree for the purpose of subduing the Baron of Harptree The garrison hoping to surprise the King s forces made a rash sally in order to attack the rear of the enemy Anticipating this the King sent his cavalry to the gates of the castle thereby cutting off the retreat of its defenders The gates were then burned down by the Royal forces and the King became master of Richmont Castle The building was saved and as late as the reign of Henry VIII when Leland wrote his itinerary it was partly in existence The ancient historian says There is a goodly Castelle at this Eastwoods called Richmonte wher noble Gurney lay much Yt is now

    Original URL path: http://www.localhistory.co.uk/ambra/txtge/ge0009.htm (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive



  •  


web-archive-uk.com, 2017-12-15