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  • Application Process – for new membership – National Society of Master Thatchers
    Climate Thatching techniques are designed to keep water out Location Quality Pitch and Aspect Algae Moss and Lichen Premature decay by white rot organisms What is being done Gallery Latest News Publications Become A Member How to apply for membership Subscription Fees Application Process Apply Members News Membership Application Process for new membership All applicants must complete and sign the membership application forms All application forms must be accompanied by cheque payment of 125 annual subscription plus 25 administration fee 150 All applications must be accompanied by details photographs and description of work undertaken of at least 4 properties including name and telephone number of the property owner The property owner must have given permission and be aware that their property has been put forward for inspection All applicants must have carried out at least 25 of the work Sponsors of new applicants must be full members of at least two years not associate corporate or apprentice members A sponsor will have to know the applicant and be confident that the applicant s work is of acceptable standard If an applicant is sponsored by a member of the exec their work may not necessarily be inspected If the applicant is

    Original URL path: https://www.nsmtltd.co.uk/become-a-member/process/ (2016-04-29)
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  • Apply – National Society of Master Thatchers
    organisms What is being done Gallery Latest News Publications Members News Contact Us National Society of Master Thatchers National Society of Master Thatchers Home What We Do Find a Thatcher Become A Member Members Area Latest News Publications Members News Contact Us Home Become A Member Apply Find A Thatcher Home Find a Thatcher What We Do Guide to Considerate Site Practice Fire Risk Management Fire Prevention Advice How Long Will A Thatched Roof Last Climate Thatching techniques are designed to keep water out Location Quality Pitch and Aspect Algae Moss and Lichen Premature decay by white rot organisms What is being done Gallery Latest News Publications Become A Member How to apply for membership Subscription Fees Application Process Apply Members News Membership Apply Applying for membership is a simple three step process Download the application form and fill out completely with your details Submit to the committee with your membership and application fee Your application will be reviewed by the committee and if successful we will contact you with your membership details Membership Application Form Connect on Twitter My Tweets Recent Posts The botanical relationship of wheat Triticum and Triticale in the production of thatching straw Comparison of lifespans

    Original URL path: https://www.nsmtltd.co.uk/become-a-member/apply/ (2016-04-29)
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  • How Long Will A Thatched Roof Last? – National Society of Master Thatchers
    Fire Prevention Advice How Long Will A Thatched Roof Last Climate Thatching techniques are designed to keep water out Location Quality Pitch and Aspect Algae Moss and Lichen Premature decay by white rot organisms What is being done Gallery Latest News Publications How Long Will A Thatched Roof Last From an historical perspective dwellings with thatched roofs in Britain were used to house the poorest families it was the cheapest form of roofing and was often substandard By comparing early photographs of thatch with those of today the differences between the condition of the thatch becomes immediately obvious With social changes during the last 100 year thatch ownership has changed too with many discerning owners wishing only that their thatch looks as good as the day it was finished this is an unrealistic and expensive aspiration Many roofs are re thatched while they still have a useful life remaining the tendency is to apply a spar coat when the roof starts to look untidy the reality is that a scruffy roof that is keeping the property warm and dry is fulfilling its intended function A thatched roof will wear and lose some of the original chocolate box charm but for

    Original URL path: https://www.nsmtltd.co.uk/how-long-will-a-thatched-roof-last/ (2016-04-29)
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  • Climate – National Society of Master Thatchers
    Climate Thatching techniques are designed to keep water out Location Quality Pitch and Aspect Algae Moss and Lichen Premature decay by white rot organisms What is being done Gallery Latest News Publications Climate A thatched roof constitutes a very hostile environment for micro organisms to grow in the past hot dry summers and frosty snowy winters controlled the speed of decay by keeping thatch relatively dry and controlling fungal growth Periods of prolonged heavy rain in the recent past have encouraged the growth of moss and algae not just on thatch but on tiled roofs trees and garden furniture with warmer winters further contributing to expanding colonisation on thatch The present climatic conditions will shorten the life expectancy of many thatched roofs Research carried out by Kirby and Rayner 1989 suggested that under normal conditions 2cm of a thatch surface is worn away annual by weathering It can be expected that a thatch wearing normally will be wet after rain at the surface to a depth of 2cm but even after continuous heavy rain the moisture content below the surface will be less than 17 deeper inside the thatch It is believed that many of the current problems associated with

    Original URL path: https://www.nsmtltd.co.uk/how-long-will-a-thatched-roof-last/climate/ (2016-04-29)
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  • Thatching techniques are designed to keep water out – National Society of Master Thatchers
    a thatched roof is the interaction between material qualities and thatching technique the skill of the thatcher roof design and material quality combine to keep a thatched roof dry on the inside Under favourable conditions water can evaporate but air movement temperature and relative humidity will influence its movement Air movement is temperature dependent roofs tend to dry out when the wind is blowing extreme weather conditions will drive water into thatch the speed at which thatch absorbs water and then dries out is an important factor in controlling the rate that thatch may decay The easiest and most important test is moisture measurements any reading above 17 moisture taken at more that 100mm depth is an indication that water may be penetrating the thatch which has the potential to support fungal growth below the surface Changes in weather patterns in the first decade of the twenty first century to wet summers and warmer wet winters means that thatch is not getting periods of hot sun necessary to dry the thatch and to desiccate and kill microorganisms Scanning electron micrograph of the node joint of the stem of thatching wheat Maris Widgeon at harvest Scanning electron micrograph of the node joint of the stem of thatching wheat Maris Wigeon which has been wetted when the yealm is formed This had been on the roof for only three years The joint is failing and the thatch stems will now no longer be secured by spars and sways allowing moisture penetration into the thatch An early indication of the potential for straw thatch degradation is fungal breakdown of the nodes Nodes are the strengthening points in a growing stem and are the point from which leaf sheaths develop In thatching straw nodes keep the stem straight and form a restriction point which

    Original URL path: https://www.nsmtltd.co.uk/how-long-will-a-thatched-roof-last/thatching-techniques/ (2016-04-29)
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  • Location, Quality, Pitch and Aspect – National Society of Master Thatchers
    Will A Thatched Roof Last Location Quality Pitch and Aspect Find A Thatcher Home Find a Thatcher What We Do Guide to Considerate Site Practice Fire Risk Management Fire Prevention Advice How Long Will A Thatched Roof Last Climate Thatching techniques are designed to keep water out Location Quality Pitch and Aspect Algae Moss and Lichen Premature decay by white rot organisms What is being done Gallery Latest News Publications Location Quality Pitch and Aspect Geographical location will influence the life of a roof thatch tends to have a shorter life expectancy in the wetter Southwest of the UK than in East Anglia Wooded areas overhanging trees valley bottoms and proximity of a river or ponds will also adversely affect the life of a thatched roof The minimum pitch for a thatched roof is 45o old properties with multi layers of thatch can lose pitch with the consequence that water is not easily shed and the roof remains wet and may deteriorate more rapidly Some new build properties are designed by architects who are not familiar with the special roof construction requirements for thatch often problems in this type of property are exacerbated by a conventional design of house with thatch on top almost as an afterthought leading to difficult slack pitched dormers Under trees and by the River Test A harsh environment for thatch Aspect It is a well established fact that the north side of a thatched roof will outlast a south or west facing aspect It is the effects of the movement of moisture and frost triggered by early sunlight that reduces the life of a south facing roof In seasons of normal rainfall and prevailing weather patterns the north side is not subjected to such environmental extremes but because sunlight is often restricted may support the

    Original URL path: https://www.nsmtltd.co.uk/how-long-will-a-thatched-roof-last/location-quality-pitch-and-aspect/ (2016-04-29)
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  • Algae, Moss and Lichen – National Society of Master Thatchers
    in Devon The algae form a mass of cells embedded in a mucilaginous gel This holds moisture and inhibits the drying of the roof and when it does dry out it forms a crust which becomes brittle and cracks appear in the thatch Algae are a large and diverse group of simple plants ranging from single celled to multicellular forms Algae will colonise thatch in wet conditions they do no harm but demonstrate that the area is wet In windy conditions and spells of hot dry weather will destroy colonies of algae Algae forming a biofilm on the north face of a roof in Devon The algae form a mass of cells embedded in a mucilaginous gel This holds moisture and inhibits the drying of the roof and when it does dry out it forms a crust which becomes brittle and cracks appear in the thatch by drying them out as this dry material cracks it may flake from the surface sometimes taking with it fragments of thatch to which it has adhered Lichens and moss growing on water reed Lichens are slow growing and indicate that this roof is not wearing quickly at the surface Identifying mosses and lichens can often be confusing in fact the two organisms are radically different Lichens are now considered to be fungi especially adapted to obtain food from algae living within their tissues Lichens form a fascinating example of cooperative relationships in nature with the fungus using the algae or bacteria to produce energy while the algae or bacteria enjoys the protection the fungus provides Lichens most likely to be found on thatch are leafy or stringy foliose these can also be found growing on the ground or around trees Moss on north facing roof surface There is also bird damage on this

    Original URL path: https://www.nsmtltd.co.uk/how-long-will-a-thatched-roof-last/algae-moss-and-lichen/ (2016-04-29)
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  • Premature decay by white rot organisms – National Society of Master Thatchers
    that dry out in sunny conditions and cause the surface to physically degrade in windy conditions This surface colonisation and physical Prolonged periods of rain encourage the colonisation of the straw thatch surface with algae and mosses These hold moisture and prevent the thatch from drying out interaction with the thatch allows the ingress of water into underlying thatch layers providing conditions suitable for further degradation of the reed by fungi and a subsequent reduced life expectancy for the roof The main body of research on decay of lignin rich materials has been carried out on wood and wood products However there are only a limited number of organisms that form symbiotic functions in the decay process many of these organisms appear to naturally colonise both wood and other decaying vegetation such as thatch In this particular form of attack decay is not homogenous across the whole surface of the coat work but can be seen as bleached areas in either zones or patches this type of decay is not necessarily associated with high wear areas of a roof such as the junctions of dormers valleys or gullies Stems taken from within these patches have often lost both tensile and compression strength causing them to collapse and fragment Scanning electron micrograph of basidiomycete gill structures hanging from a length of reed in an advanced state of decay The gills hang vertically from the underside of the straw and produce large numbers of spores Most have been shed from these gills leaving pimples where they grew In nature old plant material is composed of tough woody tissue lignin with a small level of carbohydrate present to initiate the process Many authors on the subject describe a cycle initiated and maintained by groups of organisms each with a specific role at different

    Original URL path: https://www.nsmtltd.co.uk/how-long-will-a-thatched-roof-last/premature-decay/ (2016-04-29)
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web-archive-uk.com, 2016-10-01