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  • How to price craft work
    is based on personal experience the basic pricing method is from Richard Raffan s superb book turned bowl design and the more advanced branding and context advice comes from Alistair Hughes of Savoir Beds who gave us advice as part of the crafted mentorship program Two last titbits from personal experience if you make a piece that you think is just that bit better than the rest do not feel you have to put the same price on it as the others that took the same time it s OK to put the price up if someone else likes it too they will be happy to pay the bit extra and you can compliment them on their clearly excellent taste If you have something you like so much you don t really want to sell it then crank the price right up you may find someone that loves it and buys it and you will both be happy if it doesn t sell it s nice to have it around it elevates your other work If you make things in standard production runs and one of them just comes out as the best example of that type you have made so far pull it out and don t sell it Keep it as inspiration for the next batch until you can make them all that good or maybe even better You may also like to read welcome to my new blog and website new blog new website coming soon Prince s Craft Pavilion Ideal Home Show London Ideal Home Show and new craft awards 1000 year old trees and amazing woodlands in Majorca new bowls for sale in my gallery 20 Responses to How to price craft work business advice for craftspeople Ren A June 16 2013 at 1 53 pm Great article that makes so much sense Thank you for taking time to put it together Reply jarrod June 16 2013 at 2 15 pm Good stuff to think about Robin I ve been though this many times over and still learning or adjusting and I know you know this Another factor that has an effect is the demand for craft items and it s value within a certain market It s fine to set our price with the factors you talk about but let s say with splint basketry April my wife is competing with huge box stores or import retail shops that sell this handmade item for a few dollars This is the overall basket market She does sell her baskets within a different context and a sub market but it would be pretty hard to make a living just selling these baskets at the price she would want to make per hour There are just too few of people within the market she is selling in I believe and I know some would argue but the price does have a limit that is linked within the market you sell within and that market has a certain demand If she wanted to sell within the market that would pay her a wage like you suggest she would have to be within a huge national market that consists of collectors Which is possible but not something that one just gets into within a year This market takes years to get into to Often times getting featured in a home decor magazine or the like Beginning crafts folk sometimes try to start too high without taking in these factors you can set your price to whatever you want or need but it does not mean you will sell them or the quanity one needs to make a living That takes time and experience to learn how and to which market you need to be selling in to actually sell enough I think perhaps moving through different markets as we learn and fine tune our skills at creating our items and selling is fairly realistic and a common method this includes selling things cheap as you say Over time we learn and grow and in turn end up moving into a different markets for our hand made goods Another point I think about is historically craft folk were very low class but their lives were filled with hard work which helped make them healthy and happy Often eating food that was viewed as simple but actually was far healthier than the expensive processed foods I tend to value my family time and also my flexible schedule as worth something like 1000 per hour I carve spoons and sell them for 25 each so I m making 1025 per hour per spoon My bills get paid but their is more to life than the bottom line I know you know this as well I just had to say it I hope what I wrote makes sense It s a subject that deserves attention and discussion Reply privatepinstripe June 16 2013 at 2 36 pm I have always said that the experience of receiving a product is as important as the product itself http www hatchetandbear co uk product p p Reply Robin Wood June 16 2013 at 9 43 pm Thanks Ren and PP glad it was useful Hi Jarrod I for one would love one of April s gorgeous baskets if you have room in the pack when you come to the UK I will buy one There is of course a limit to the price that folk will pay within a certain market I was turning at a village show last weekend and I simply do not put work out for sale because I don t want to embarrass the folk asking how much it is or myself I know they are not going to pay what it is worth I personally am no fan of the collector market I dislike the ego driven art craft world and prefer to make work that will be used rather than treated as an art object There is in the UK and I am sure the US another world the luxury sector This is the world of handmade shoes bespoke suits vintage wine the people who buy these things want excellence and are not price sensitive They appreciate the work and use it and having paid serious money for it they value it Think how you feel when you save up for a wonderful craftsman made tool there will be people out there that feel that way about baskets you only need to find a few hundred of them a year from a population of 313 million Of course most folk can t afford or choose not to pay properly for April s work not many folk can afford to have a hand made suit either but as David Hieatt said to us at the HCA conference If you are making gold make sure that you are not selling it as silver Most people are not in the gold market but that is no reason to sell gold to them at silver prices Our job is to find the people who are looking for excellence and make sure that our work is correctly presented Reply Will Simpson June 17 2013 at 3 19 am Great stuff to consider Robin you and Jarrod bring up some great points particularly around buyers being price sensitive or not It has always surprised me that even craftsmen can be inconsiderate when considering a craftsmen s work in different media Sad But is is even something I have to watch in myself Robin you mention that some craftsmen price their work as if they are in the journeyman or master stage of their craft even though they are just starting I plead guilty I have been carving spoons since 2008 I still feel very much a beginner Jarrod sells his spoons for 25 I have been selling mine for 29 Now seems I m a little vain given his skills and my inexperience I m going to adjust my price Maybe I ll sell more and have to make more thereby developing my skills and getting better and being able to increase the demand One advantage disadvantage to having a higher price is that I don t have to make so many spoons Fewer customers but the customers I have are not price sensitive Reply Robin Wood June 17 2013 at 8 38 am Will I would not necessarily say someone earlier on the road should sell for less Profesional craftspeople often bemoan amateurs selling for the cost of the materials and creating a false impression of what the price for craftwork should be It is a difficult thing to do but if you were to put your work alongside a good piece of professional work if it is as good then sell it for a similar price if it is not then up there yet then sell it for less There will always be people who will buy based on price and there will always be people who have a great eye for choosing the best and are prepared to pay a little more We tend to easily get disheartened if we only sell in one context which is price sensitive If Alexander McQueen had tried to sell clothes at the local craft fair folk would have thought they were bizarre and ridiculously expensive Reply Nin June 17 2013 at 10 00 am I enjoyed this article and its timely for me since I know I ve been screwing myself on price for some time also have to mention that I remember the lemonade game Reply Sounds from the Heart June 17 2013 at 6 15 pm People with less making experience should not keep their prices down in respect for expert If they can sell for a higher price then the expert also needs to put his prices up If the journeyman puts on a high price and fails to sell it makes the expert look good Every maker should value their work anyone making original work should value the art as well as the craft You say time is usually halved by non productive workshop activities i tend to agree with the Crafts Council who suggested that in running a business only about one third of time is really productive Thus treble your needs for contact hours then double them again at market It sound ridiculous but any other way is the road to financial struggles such as most craftsmen live with Reply Will Simpson June 17 2013 at 10 12 pm I am but a simple maker If my spoons look traditional it is only by accident Selling spoons is local People who buy my spoons will likely never hear about the spoon makers Robin Jarrod Jogge or probably any other spoon maker of note Context is important I read somewhere that each day is worth a 1000 00 and to sell a spoon for 25 00 makes the day worth 1025 00 This is good conversation I understand the supply demand formula and the need to account for cost of sales but I so slow that using the formula would make the spoons I do make unaffordable I really like the idea of pricing the spoons so that they move and I have to make more As the joy is in the making Reply Daniel Moore Allen schpoingle nosubject13 June 28 2013 at 11 03 am It is hard and i ve just recently started selling at a price that doesn t make me embarrassed To people that are asking about this then they are probably not really serious about their craft or art you need to be putting out so much for so long that you learn all of this on your own you sell for as much as you can price it high and keep lowering it until it sells now some types of work just have too much time to ever get your worth in dollar back unless it s in a fine art gallery Robin did a post a while back on a clog maker who talkes briefly on this topic and this guy is amazing at what he does He also is missing teeth and is forthright in not being able to turn out work fast enough or not being able to make enough Making 20 pairs of shoes from hand is not like turning 20 bowls in one day That s the way the cookie crumbles though You better be in this for the love You better have to do it or you ll never get anywhere anyway We live in a time of individualism and everybody want to make their own art and start their own business This kill the market for crafts and arts The people who used to be support the artists now spend their money playing artist If you really want to make your love your living you need to dig in and relax For me it s nice being humble and simple is a way of life when things get crazy in life i don t fret i tell myself hey it s okay i ve got wood and i m gonna carve until i die and for some reason it makes everything okay any pricing or business will sort itself out through consistency and persistance everything in life changes but not the simplicity of doing what you enjoy doing sorry for rambling and ranting Robin thanks for sharing your life and thoughts as always Reply Minouche June 28 2013 at 11 03 am I just stumbled upon your blog when looking for green woodworking courses Great advice about pricing craft work thank you I ve come to realise that justifying realistic price tags to people who are used to buying mass produced goods is a waste of breath Getting my work to the people that will value it that is the challenge I m focussing on Reply privatepinstripe June 29 2013 at 11 32 pm Really like what Daniel Moore Allen says Reply primitivecrafts June 30 2013 at 4 34 pm Breaking into the business of selling crafts is hard enough without having to worry about pricing as well As we are constantly hit with a barrage of mass produced items that are sold cheaply it is often too easy just to price the things we make even lower Just searching for hand carved spoons on ebay etsy etc gives such a huge price range it s hard to see if and where we fit in Robin s post helps to cut through the minefield a bit Thanks Robin Reply Graeme December 2 2013 at 4 16 am Excellent advice Robin but there is another consideration that farmers understand There comes a time when a decision has to made whether to plough in a crop or sell it at a loss The argument goes that if you can recover the cost of harvest then harvest it and hope for a better season next year With crafts if you re starting out you re not only competing with the established but with the hobby crafters clearing out the basement for christmas cash etc There may be times when it is necessary to sell way below what you want just to get cash and make room I don t mean dump it through your main outlet or over the internet but sell through nearby fairs fetes markets etc at a cost recovery price the cost of selling and materials and keep the best items for a fair price I m also not a fan of the old Supply and Demand curve That model is why there are always people who can t afford decent clothes houses medicine and aids such as glasses and hearing aids even in prosperous countries Reply kiko denzer December 8 2013 at 7 30 pm Like farming art succeeds or fails not according to the number of carrots and potatoes you pull out of the ground but according to the fertility of the soil and the health of the community When the soil overflows with fertility and the community overflows with health all products become gifts and exchange becomes celebration This is from an essay at http www theworkofart org content making money Lewis Hyde s important book The Gift also puts this discussion into context Trade begins with an understanding of exchange rooted in the knowledge that all of life comes to us as a gift which suggests that our obligation is not to make money but to make sure that the gift can always move I have a friend whose career goal was to be able to do the work he loved for free That comes w it s own set of challenges too but it s good I think to consider the question from an angle completely opposite to the current consumerist mindset Reply Roy Davi December 29 2013 at 12 17 am This is a conversation that I friends and family often have and the obvious solution is always forth coming If any object speaks to you of it s own beauty then a price will follow Time and again this happens as I see other peoples work and think of the skill and soul put into the piece The stools and seats I sell at markets and festivals in Australia are varied in character and attract different comments fromthe people who watch as I demonstrate pole lathe turning The novelty of this act is a definite draw card to those who come to the many market events in the Blue Mountains and Sydney surrounds Setting an affordable price even when there are few people to compete against is difficult but I try to put a base value on my time then add extra which I call my incentive gape price that will allow me to cover consumerable costs and allow for my passion for creating craft that others an I appreciate to continue
    http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2013/06/15/how-to-price-craft-work-business-advice-for-craftspeople/?replytocom=3820 (2016-05-01)


  • How to price craft work
    based on personal experience the basic pricing method is from Richard Raffan s superb book turned bowl design and the more advanced branding and context advice comes from Alistair Hughes of Savoir Beds who gave us advice as part of the crafted mentorship program Two last titbits from personal experience if you make a piece that you think is just that bit better than the rest do not feel you have to put the same price on it as the others that took the same time it s OK to put the price up if someone else likes it too they will be happy to pay the bit extra and you can compliment them on their clearly excellent taste If you have something you like so much you don t really want to sell it then crank the price right up you may find someone that loves it and buys it and you will both be happy if it doesn t sell it s nice to have it around it elevates your other work If you make things in standard production runs and one of them just comes out as the best example of that type you have made so far pull it out and don t sell it Keep it as inspiration for the next batch until you can make them all that good or maybe even better You may also like to read welcome to my new blog and website new blog new website coming soon Prince s Craft Pavilion Ideal Home Show London Ideal Home Show and new craft awards 1000 year old trees and amazing woodlands in Majorca new bowls for sale in my gallery 20 Responses to How to price craft work business advice for craftspeople Ren A June 16 2013 at 1 53 pm Great article that makes so much sense Thank you for taking time to put it together Reply jarrod June 16 2013 at 2 15 pm Good stuff to think about Robin I ve been though this many times over and still learning or adjusting and I know you know this Another factor that has an effect is the demand for craft items and it s value within a certain market It s fine to set our price with the factors you talk about but let s say with splint basketry April my wife is competing with huge box stores or import retail shops that sell this handmade item for a few dollars This is the overall basket market She does sell her baskets within a different context and a sub market but it would be pretty hard to make a living just selling these baskets at the price she would want to make per hour There are just too few of people within the market she is selling in I believe and I know some would argue but the price does have a limit that is linked within the market you sell within and that market has a certain demand If she wanted to sell within the market that would pay her a wage like you suggest she would have to be within a huge national market that consists of collectors Which is possible but not something that one just gets into within a year This market takes years to get into to Often times getting featured in a home decor magazine or the like Beginning crafts folk sometimes try to start too high without taking in these factors you can set your price to whatever you want or need but it does not mean you will sell them or the quanity one needs to make a living That takes time and experience to learn how and to which market you need to be selling in to actually sell enough I think perhaps moving through different markets as we learn and fine tune our skills at creating our items and selling is fairly realistic and a common method this includes selling things cheap as you say Over time we learn and grow and in turn end up moving into a different markets for our hand made goods Another point I think about is historically craft folk were very low class but their lives were filled with hard work which helped make them healthy and happy Often eating food that was viewed as simple but actually was far healthier than the expensive processed foods I tend to value my family time and also my flexible schedule as worth something like 1000 per hour I carve spoons and sell them for 25 each so I m making 1025 per hour per spoon My bills get paid but their is more to life than the bottom line I know you know this as well I just had to say it I hope what I wrote makes sense It s a subject that deserves attention and discussion Reply privatepinstripe June 16 2013 at 2 36 pm I have always said that the experience of receiving a product is as important as the product itself http www hatchetandbear co uk product p p Reply Robin Wood June 16 2013 at 9 43 pm Thanks Ren and PP glad it was useful Hi Jarrod I for one would love one of April s gorgeous baskets if you have room in the pack when you come to the UK I will buy one There is of course a limit to the price that folk will pay within a certain market I was turning at a village show last weekend and I simply do not put work out for sale because I don t want to embarrass the folk asking how much it is or myself I know they are not going to pay what it is worth I personally am no fan of the collector market I dislike the ego driven art craft world and prefer to make work that will be used rather than treated as an art object There is in the UK and I am sure the US another world the luxury sector This is the world of handmade shoes bespoke suits vintage wine the people who buy these things want excellence and are not price sensitive They appreciate the work and use it and having paid serious money for it they value it Think how you feel when you save up for a wonderful craftsman made tool there will be people out there that feel that way about baskets you only need to find a few hundred of them a year from a population of 313 million Of course most folk can t afford or choose not to pay properly for April s work not many folk can afford to have a hand made suit either but as David Hieatt said to us at the HCA conference If you are making gold make sure that you are not selling it as silver Most people are not in the gold market but that is no reason to sell gold to them at silver prices Our job is to find the people who are looking for excellence and make sure that our work is correctly presented Reply Will Simpson June 17 2013 at 3 19 am Great stuff to consider Robin you and Jarrod bring up some great points particularly around buyers being price sensitive or not It has always surprised me that even craftsmen can be inconsiderate when considering a craftsmen s work in different media Sad But is is even something I have to watch in myself Robin you mention that some craftsmen price their work as if they are in the journeyman or master stage of their craft even though they are just starting I plead guilty I have been carving spoons since 2008 I still feel very much a beginner Jarrod sells his spoons for 25 I have been selling mine for 29 Now seems I m a little vain given his skills and my inexperience I m going to adjust my price Maybe I ll sell more and have to make more thereby developing my skills and getting better and being able to increase the demand One advantage disadvantage to having a higher price is that I don t have to make so many spoons Fewer customers but the customers I have are not price sensitive Reply Robin Wood June 17 2013 at 8 38 am Will I would not necessarily say someone earlier on the road should sell for less Profesional craftspeople often bemoan amateurs selling for the cost of the materials and creating a false impression of what the price for craftwork should be It is a difficult thing to do but if you were to put your work alongside a good piece of professional work if it is as good then sell it for a similar price if it is not then up there yet then sell it for less There will always be people who will buy based on price and there will always be people who have a great eye for choosing the best and are prepared to pay a little more We tend to easily get disheartened if we only sell in one context which is price sensitive If Alexander McQueen had tried to sell clothes at the local craft fair folk would have thought they were bizarre and ridiculously expensive Reply Nin June 17 2013 at 10 00 am I enjoyed this article and its timely for me since I know I ve been screwing myself on price for some time also have to mention that I remember the lemonade game Reply Sounds from the Heart June 17 2013 at 6 15 pm People with less making experience should not keep their prices down in respect for expert If they can sell for a higher price then the expert also needs to put his prices up If the journeyman puts on a high price and fails to sell it makes the expert look good Every maker should value their work anyone making original work should value the art as well as the craft You say time is usually halved by non productive workshop activities i tend to agree with the Crafts Council who suggested that in running a business only about one third of time is really productive Thus treble your needs for contact hours then double them again at market It sound ridiculous but any other way is the road to financial struggles such as most craftsmen live with Reply Will Simpson June 17 2013 at 10 12 pm I am but a simple maker If my spoons look traditional it is only by accident Selling spoons is local People who buy my spoons will likely never hear about the spoon makers Robin Jarrod Jogge or probably any other spoon maker of note Context is important I read somewhere that each day is worth a 1000 00 and to sell a spoon for 25 00 makes the day worth 1025 00 This is good conversation I understand the supply demand formula and the need to account for cost of sales but I so slow that using the formula would make the spoons I do make unaffordable I really like the idea of pricing the spoons so that they move and I have to make more As the joy is in the making Reply Daniel Moore Allen schpoingle nosubject13 June 28 2013 at 11 03 am It is hard and i ve just recently started selling at a price that doesn t make me embarrassed To people that are asking about this then they are probably not really serious about their craft or art you need to be putting out so much for so long that you learn all of this on your own you sell for as much as you can price it high and keep lowering it until it sells now some types of work just have too much time to ever get your worth in dollar back unless it s in a fine art gallery Robin did a post a while back on a clog maker who talkes briefly on this topic and this guy is amazing at what he does He also is missing teeth and is forthright in not being able to turn out work fast enough or not being able to make enough Making 20 pairs of shoes from hand is not like turning 20 bowls in one day That s the way the cookie crumbles though You better be in this for the love You better have to do it or you ll never get anywhere anyway We live in a time of individualism and everybody want to make their own art and start their own business This kill the market for crafts and arts The people who used to be support the artists now spend their money playing artist If you really want to make your love your living you need to dig in and relax For me it s nice being humble and simple is a way of life when things get crazy in life i don t fret i tell myself hey it s okay i ve got wood and i m gonna carve until i die and for some reason it makes everything okay any pricing or business will sort itself out through consistency and persistance everything in life changes but not the simplicity of doing what you enjoy doing sorry for rambling and ranting Robin thanks for sharing your life and thoughts as always Reply Minouche June 28 2013 at 11 03 am I just stumbled upon your blog when looking for green woodworking courses Great advice about pricing craft work thank you I ve come to realise that justifying realistic price tags to people who are used to buying mass produced goods is a waste of breath Getting my work to the people that will value it that is the challenge I m focussing on Reply privatepinstripe June 29 2013 at 11 32 pm Really like what Daniel Moore Allen says Reply primitivecrafts June 30 2013 at 4 34 pm Breaking into the business of selling crafts is hard enough without having to worry about pricing as well As we are constantly hit with a barrage of mass produced items that are sold cheaply it is often too easy just to price the things we make even lower Just searching for hand carved spoons on ebay etsy etc gives such a huge price range it s hard to see if and where we fit in Robin s post helps to cut through the minefield a bit Thanks Robin Reply Graeme December 2 2013 at 4 16 am Excellent advice Robin but there is another consideration that farmers understand There comes a time when a decision has to made whether to plough in a crop or sell it at a loss The argument goes that if you can recover the cost of harvest then harvest it and hope for a better season next year With crafts if you re starting out you re not only competing with the established but with the hobby crafters clearing out the basement for christmas cash etc There may be times when it is necessary to sell way below what you want just to get cash and make room I don t mean dump it through your main outlet or over the internet but sell through nearby fairs fetes markets etc at a cost recovery price the cost of selling and materials and keep the best items for a fair price I m also not a fan of the old Supply and Demand curve That model is why there are always people who can t afford decent clothes houses medicine and aids such as glasses and hearing aids even in prosperous countries Reply kiko denzer December 8 2013 at 7 30 pm Like farming art succeeds or fails not according to the number of carrots and potatoes you pull out of the ground but according to the fertility of the soil and the health of the community When the soil overflows with fertility and the community overflows with health all products become gifts and exchange becomes celebration This is from an essay at http www theworkofart org content making money Lewis Hyde s important book The Gift also puts this discussion into context Trade begins with an understanding of exchange rooted in the knowledge that all of life comes to us as a gift which suggests that our obligation is not to make money but to make sure that the gift can always move I have a friend whose career goal was to be able to do the work he loved for free That comes w it s own set of challenges too but it s good I think to consider the question from an angle completely opposite to the current consumerist mindset Reply Roy Davi December 29 2013 at 12 17 am This is a conversation that I friends and family often have and the obvious solution is always forth coming If any object speaks to you of it s own beauty then a price will follow Time and again this happens as I see other peoples work and think of the skill and soul put into the piece The stools and seats I sell at markets and festivals in Australia are varied in character and attract different comments fromthe people who watch as I demonstrate pole lathe turning The novelty of this act is a definite draw card to those who come to the many market events in the Blue Mountains and Sydney surrounds Setting an affordable price even when there are few people to compete against is difficult but I try to put a base value on my time then add extra which I call my incentive gape price that will allow me to cover consumerable costs and allow for my passion for creating craft that others an I appreciate to continue I
    http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2013/06/15/how-to-price-craft-work-business-advice-for-craftspeople/?replytocom=3822 (2016-05-01)

  • woodworking tools Archives - Robin Wood
    Wisconsin to learn and share We have a had a brief break from canoe building work to get ready for the bowl turning course I am teaching at North House Folk School We visited Jarrod s friend Mike to borrow his well equipped blacksmith workshop and to forge a bunch of tools for the Continue Reading 3 a few new spoon knives available By Robin Wood on February 28 2013 in knives spoon carving Uncategorized woodworking tools Sorry these are all sold now I am keeping an email list of folk that want them no commitment and no guarantee when they will be here but I ll send you an email as soon as the next ones are in stock I have been forging my own hook tools and spoon knives for 20 Continue Reading 1 Which is the best spoon carving knife hook knife By Robin Wood on January 29 2013 in knives promoted spoon carving woodworking tools I have posted before about the best axe and straight knife for carving and the third tool that is needed is the spoon knife or hook knife Opinions vary enormously as to which is the best spoon carving knife if you search the web you will find lots of folk vehemently arguing that this or Continue Reading 14 a tool every turner needs By Robin Wood on January 12 2013 in bowls and bowlturning Uncategorized woodworking tools There must be no bowl turner in the world that can get by without one of these It s the first tool you use to mark out the wood yet most folk have nasty flimsy ones that don t do the job very well I love these old forged ones I like the way they feel in Continue Reading 3 Japanese axes adzes and
    http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/category/woodworking-tools/ (2016-05-01)


  • "Crafted" business advice for craftspeople - Robin Wood
    and the speakers were very very good on their subjects Top tips for me came from Alistair Campbell of Savoir beds we learned how he had bought the business when the Savoy sold off their bed manufacturing business in 1997 at which point they had 2 5 employees and one customer the Savoy who had wisely enough bought all the beds they needed before selling the business on Alistair has built the business to now employ 120 people and have a turnover of 7 million without compromising on the time consuming handmade production methods I love the tag line of the website spend a third of your life in first class Alastair asked the key question why might you need to source finance There were two answers 1 because your business is basically unprofitable 2 because you have a profitable business which you want to invest in to grow You can guess which if these is a good reason to borrow money and which is not Alistair related stories of negotiations with bank managers over the years but the best advice was perhaps the discussions about cashflow His raw materials are expensive huge quantities of things like horse tails which often have to be paid for long before they are delivered and maybe years before the final bed is delivered and paid for by the customer All craftspeople are in this position and many who make to order have to buy in materials long before the customer pays If you don t take a large deposit then you are effectively giving your customer credit and running yourself in debt The more money you can encourage the customer to part with and the sooner the less likely you are to have cash flow problems Apparently Harrods run a sort of loyalty scheme which offers benefits depending on how much you spend if you are buying a special commission from them then only the deposit counts toward the loyalty scheme so a very high proportion of customers pay 100 deposit If a furniture maker takes an average of 3 months from commission to delivery and takes 50 rather than 25 deposit that makes a huge difference to cashflow All good food for thought I look forward to my meeting with Bill Amberg and to the next workshop on branding in February You may also like to read Do what you love Birch bark canoe trip to the boundary waters Haddon Hall show preview Six happy years why do we work Which is the best spoon carving knife hook knife One Response to Crafted business advice for craftspeople Malina Tysonh February 22 2013 at 11 11 am I feel really nice reading these articles I mean there are writers that can write good material business listing Reply Leave a Reply Click here to cancel reply Name required Email will not be published required Comment Search Blog Posts News and social media My newsletter has updates on new products courses and events Sign up
    http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2013/01/29/crafted-business-advice-for-craftspeople/ (2016-05-01)

  • The Whelkman of Whitstable Harbour - Robin Wood
    differently One Response to The Whelkman of Whitstable Harbour Stephen z February 12 2013 at 12 53 pm Robin What a delightful man Living a simple life and enjoying it Isn t that what it is all about Being from the US I had to watch it twice to be able to understand the accent but it was worth it Steve Reply Leave a Reply Click here to cancel reply Name required Email will not be published required Comment Search Blog Posts News and social media My newsletter has updates on new products courses and events Sign up here Latest blog posts Creative goodness The story of a spoon Spooncarving knife making in Sheffield Do what you love The Man Who Made Things From Trees me on Radio 4 Featured blog posts How to price craft work business advice for craftspeople Which is the best spoon carving knife hook knife any fool can make something more complex but it takes real genius to make things simple again building the world s most iconic viking ship part 1 Welsh love spoons and cawl spoons how to make a new axe handle What is the best knife for wood carving and whittling which is the best axe for carving bushcraft general use how to carve wooden bowls what is the best oil for treating wood Past posts Past posts Select Month April 2016 February 2016 December 2015 November 2015 September 2015 August 2015 June 2015 May 2015 April 2015 March 2015 February 2015 January 2015 December 2014 November 2014 October 2014 September 2014 August 2014 July 2014 June 2014 May 2014 April 2014 March 2014 February 2014 January 2014 December 2013 November 2013 October 2013 September 2013 July 2013 June 2013 May 2013 April 2013 March 2013 February 2013 January 2013 December
    http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2013/02/11/the-whelkman-of-whitstable-harbour/ (2016-05-01)

  • which is the best spoon carving knife
    few batches of these and still use them for my courses though Bo is not always easy to buy from If you see them in stock anywhere buy one There are probably only two folk who have used more spoon knives for longer than me Del Stubbs and Jogge Sundqvist and both rate the Helgesson as the benchmark knife It s 5 years since I was last able to get a batch of Bo s knives and it has been difficult having students using them and then having to buy something less good I have worked with various smiths and companies getting prototypes made in the UK and never been happy I have now finally got prototypes of spoon blades which are excellent They are made from flat bar rather than round I rate them as virtually as good as the Helgesson hook They come razor sharp and hold an edge extremely well I am not sure how long the first batch will take to come through so in the meantime there is plenty of choice in the links above For the sake of completeness I would like to add three other good makers I don t have these knives but I have used them Dave Budd nice hand forged ethos Dorset Woodland Blades top quality control good blades Nic Westerman excellent blades You may also like to read The story of a spoon Spooncarving knife making in Sheffield Spoon carving tools giveaway competition Gransfors bruks carving axe wildlife hatchet and Robin Wood carving axe compared Crafted business advice for craftspeople The Whelkman of Whitstable Harbour 14 Responses to Which is the best spoon carving knife hook knife ziggy January 29 2013 at 4 03 pm Thanks for the round up I have recently gotten in spoon carving and find the Frost knives to be less than pleasant to use a real workout with not a lot of reward Pretty dull Reply jarrod January 29 2013 at 4 03 pm Hey Robin another great post Very informative Few people can compare that many hook knives Well done Reply Survival in the Wasteland January 29 2013 at 5 40 pm Robin for th sake of clarity are you saying you will have these hook knives you ve had made available for sale in th future thanks for th comparisons rico Reply Robin Wood January 29 2013 at 6 22 pm Thanks Ziggy and JarrodHi Rico I will have knives available but when and how many I can not say If you need a knife in the near future buy one elsewhere I can t promise when I will have stock available It s frustrating but that s the way it is Reply privatepinstripe January 31 2013 at 6 22 pm For the record I used a Robin Helgesson today under Robin s tuition and it was Brilliant with a capital B Reply woodnstuff February 1 2013 at 8 19 am Looks like you ve finally found the holy grail Rob Put
    http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2013/01/29/best-spoon-carving-knife-hook-knife/comment-page-1/ (2016-05-01)

  • which is the best spoon carving knife
    batches of these and still use them for my courses though Bo is not always easy to buy from If you see them in stock anywhere buy one There are probably only two folk who have used more spoon knives for longer than me Del Stubbs and Jogge Sundqvist and both rate the Helgesson as the benchmark knife It s 5 years since I was last able to get a batch of Bo s knives and it has been difficult having students using them and then having to buy something less good I have worked with various smiths and companies getting prototypes made in the UK and never been happy I have now finally got prototypes of spoon blades which are excellent They are made from flat bar rather than round I rate them as virtually as good as the Helgesson hook They come razor sharp and hold an edge extremely well I am not sure how long the first batch will take to come through so in the meantime there is plenty of choice in the links above For the sake of completeness I would like to add three other good makers I don t have these knives but I have used them Dave Budd nice hand forged ethos Dorset Woodland Blades top quality control good blades Nic Westerman excellent blades You may also like to read The story of a spoon Spooncarving knife making in Sheffield Spoon carving tools giveaway competition Gransfors bruks carving axe wildlife hatchet and Robin Wood carving axe compared Crafted business advice for craftspeople The Whelkman of Whitstable Harbour 14 Responses to Which is the best spoon carving knife hook knife ziggy January 29 2013 at 4 03 pm Thanks for the round up I have recently gotten in spoon carving and find the Frost knives to be less than pleasant to use a real workout with not a lot of reward Pretty dull Reply jarrod January 29 2013 at 4 03 pm Hey Robin another great post Very informative Few people can compare that many hook knives Well done Reply Survival in the Wasteland January 29 2013 at 5 40 pm Robin for th sake of clarity are you saying you will have these hook knives you ve had made available for sale in th future thanks for th comparisons rico Reply Robin Wood January 29 2013 at 6 22 pm Thanks Ziggy and JarrodHi Rico I will have knives available but when and how many I can not say If you need a knife in the near future buy one elsewhere I can t promise when I will have stock available It s frustrating but that s the way it is Reply privatepinstripe January 31 2013 at 6 22 pm For the record I used a Robin Helgesson today under Robin s tuition and it was Brilliant with a capital B Reply woodnstuff February 1 2013 at 8 19 am Looks like you ve finally found the holy grail Rob Put me
    http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2013/01/29/best-spoon-carving-knife-hook-knife/?replytocom=3684 (2016-05-01)

  • which is the best spoon carving knife
    of these and still use them for my courses though Bo is not always easy to buy from If you see them in stock anywhere buy one There are probably only two folk who have used more spoon knives for longer than me Del Stubbs and Jogge Sundqvist and both rate the Helgesson as the benchmark knife It s 5 years since I was last able to get a batch of Bo s knives and it has been difficult having students using them and then having to buy something less good I have worked with various smiths and companies getting prototypes made in the UK and never been happy I have now finally got prototypes of spoon blades which are excellent They are made from flat bar rather than round I rate them as virtually as good as the Helgesson hook They come razor sharp and hold an edge extremely well I am not sure how long the first batch will take to come through so in the meantime there is plenty of choice in the links above For the sake of completeness I would like to add three other good makers I don t have these knives but I have used them Dave Budd nice hand forged ethos Dorset Woodland Blades top quality control good blades Nic Westerman excellent blades You may also like to read The story of a spoon Spooncarving knife making in Sheffield Spoon carving tools giveaway competition Gransfors bruks carving axe wildlife hatchet and Robin Wood carving axe compared Crafted business advice for craftspeople The Whelkman of Whitstable Harbour 14 Responses to Which is the best spoon carving knife hook knife ziggy January 29 2013 at 4 03 pm Thanks for the round up I have recently gotten in spoon carving and find the Frost knives to be less than pleasant to use a real workout with not a lot of reward Pretty dull Reply jarrod January 29 2013 at 4 03 pm Hey Robin another great post Very informative Few people can compare that many hook knives Well done Reply Survival in the Wasteland January 29 2013 at 5 40 pm Robin for th sake of clarity are you saying you will have these hook knives you ve had made available for sale in th future thanks for th comparisons rico Reply Robin Wood January 29 2013 at 6 22 pm Thanks Ziggy and JarrodHi Rico I will have knives available but when and how many I can not say If you need a knife in the near future buy one elsewhere I can t promise when I will have stock available It s frustrating but that s the way it is Reply privatepinstripe January 31 2013 at 6 22 pm For the record I used a Robin Helgesson today under Robin s tuition and it was Brilliant with a capital B Reply woodnstuff February 1 2013 at 8 19 am Looks like you ve finally found the holy grail Rob Put me down
    http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2013/01/29/best-spoon-carving-knife-hook-knife/?replytocom=3686 (2016-05-01)


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