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  • building the world's most iconic Viking ship, part 2 - Robin Wood
    makign finer shavings and tidying the surface This is all done in a very public worksite with a footpath right through the middle Norwegian attitude to health and safety apparently puts much more responsibility on individuals to be sensible look after their own safety I don t know how their accident figures compare but it does mean that folk get to see the work up close in a way that would be more difficult in the UK This is my small board after hewing both sides this is where you are expected to get to with just the axe You work right up to but leave the pencil marks showing Then you can move on to planing They had on the worksite the largest collection of Viking replica tools in the world I ll do another post showing lots of them but they included various replica planes This was my favourite You plane first across the grain or at a slight angle then down the grain Here s a close up of this lovely plane with it s simple but beautiful horse head decoration The final finishing was done with a scraping tool the original boards showed the medulary rays standing proud and this is what happens when you use this tool again a replica of a 9th century find So that gives us a prepared board Compared to sawing you get less than half the planks from a tree though they are very strong and flexible since you know the fibres run down the length of the plank Today we would consider it wasteful but in the 9th century large timber trees were plentiful and all heating and cooking in the homes in the area was done on wood so in some ways you could say we were making lots of kindling and firewood and the ship was a by product More posts to come on steaming and bending and fitting the boards to the ship as well as lots of gorgeous tools You may also like to read Do what you love Birch bark canoe trip to the boundary waters Teaching and learning in the USA Haddon Hall show preview building the world s most iconic viking ship part 1 building the world s most iconic viking ship part 3 4 Responses to building the world s most iconic Viking ship part 2 Gorges Smythe November 15 2011 at 11 27 am Fascinating Reply Alviti November 15 2011 at 5 55 pm This is realy interesting thanks for putting this on I m going to have to try hewing one day Reply Jackie Morris November 16 2011 at 8 20 am Love the tools and the shape of the boat Someone sent this post in to me as a link to my competition at my blog drawingalineintime blogspot com 2011 10 pleasure district contest of beauty htmlI will put a link on to your posting later It is indeed truely beautiful work Reply Jeff November 16 2011 at
    http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2011/11/15/building-the-worlds-most-iconic-viking-ship-part-2/ (2016-05-01)


  • building the world's most iconic viking ship, part 3 - Robin Wood
    fully what I wished to query was not the process of steaming in itself but what process the Vikings themselves would have used It seemed a shame that all the work was carried out with period hand tools but the steaming was carried out using what looks like a fairly modern method I have previously come across someone using boiling water applied directly to the wood using force backed up with clamps to bend lapstrake on a boat and wondered if the Vikings could have employed a similar method rather then the use of steam The Romans were aware of the power of boiling water which they utilised for mining again more knowledge lost than remembered The tools that are being used are fascinating I m especially intrigued by the clamps and the spokeshave Your comment about the similarity between the axes used on this project and modern Japanese axes also begs the question when did the Japanese begin using Swedish steel for some of their best quality tools Again just curious as I m a big fan of Swedish tools Reply Robin Wood November 29 2011 at 12 10 am Rhugi I didn t know Japanese were using Swedish steel they certainly make some of the best steel in the world themselves In the 17th C then Swedish iron was imported into the UK in large quantities and turned into blister steel here in large bottle kilns there is just one left surviving We don t know how the Vikings heated their wood whether steam or hot water We do know that it is necessary to get the wood heated thoroughly through in order for it to bend then hold the bend once cool This could easily have been done with hot rocks and hot water or steam as per the Haida method I am not sure how much there would be to gain or learn from creating steam with hot rocks against working with a boiler There is much to learn and a very different end result from using hand tools and cleft wood rather than sawing I guess they have to focus their funds the timber was no doubt brought to site with a lorry rather than dragged or floated Reply Rhugl November 29 2011 at 9 03 am Robin The reason I asked about the Viking method of bending was to establish 1 whether they used some method unknown unlikely and whether anyone actually knew what method they used2 whether the bending method they used altered the structure of the wood in a manner more conductive to Viking shipbuilding given that the first reconstructed ship sank due to unknown reasons than steaming didI do not doubt that they had to target their funds but to compare a method employed in the constructionof the ship bending and the method of transporting the logs to the site is not a valid comparison in my opinion As to Swedish steel it is currently on offer through the tools from
    http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2011/11/16/building-the-worlds-most-iconic-viking-ship-part-3/ (2016-05-01)

  • building the world's most iconic viking ship, part 4 - Robin Wood
    with the cross pein to spread the klink and then flip the hammer over and go round and round the outside to dome it nicely When it s done it looks like this This is one of mine and goes through a scarf joint That s my klink it really is a great feeling to be a small part of this project and to know there is some of my work in the final ship As the timber in the ship dries it will shrink slightly and all these klinks will need hammering again to tighten them up I don t know just how many there are but it must run into several thousand and no one is looking forward to that job and now a little video clip of klinking In the UK with our often acidic soil conditions when we do find old clinker built ships the klinks are often the only thing to survive when all the wood has been dissolved away That was the case at our most famous ship burial Sutton Hoo this image shows the klinks or rivets in place and the outline of the boat in the sand but all the wood was gone The same is true for the ship found recently in Scotland the only Viking age ship burial so far found on the UK mainland It will be interesting to learn more of that find as it is excavated Just a couple more posts to come now showing all the replica Viking tools and some more shots of the boat and it s fantastic carvings You may also like to read Do what you love Birch bark canoe trip to the boundary waters Teaching and learning in the USA Haddon Hall show preview building the world s most iconic viking ship part 3 building the world s most iconic viking ship part 5 2 Responses to building the world s most iconic viking ship part 4 Gorges Smythe November 17 2011 at 3 02 am It amazes me what a shallow hull they had Reply Dec June 26 2012 at 8 40 am It would have been a nice touch if each plank maker had been allowed to leave their makers mark on their work albeit with a small and subtle runic inscription but I have to assume after all that work that you know exactly where your plank is and would be able to find it again in a heartbeat A fantastic experience Hopefully we will get to see it here in Ireland at some stage Viking longships have a habit of washing up here on our shores Reply Leave a Reply Click here to cancel reply Name required Email will not be published required Comment Search Blog Posts News and social media My newsletter has updates on new products courses and events Sign up here Latest blog posts Creative goodness The story of a spoon Spooncarving knife making in Sheffield Do what you love The Man Who Made
    http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2011/11/16/building-the-worlds-most-iconic-viking-ship-part-4/ (2016-05-01)


  • building the world's most iconic viking ship, part 5 - Robin Wood
    iconic viking ship part 6 2 Responses to building the world s most iconic viking ship part 5 Gorges Smythe November 16 2011 at 11 15 pm Beautiful Reply richard salvatore November 2 2015 at 5 53 pm Many viking style klinker built ships are being produced these days Replicas of the Gokstad ship and even a pre viking era vessel I ve seen You and your work on the Oseberg replica are the ONLY example of staying true to form in the modern era I only wish to make clear how vital this is to the art and to thank you for doing your best on the New Oseberg Ship Reply Leave a Reply Click here to cancel reply Name required Email will not be published required Comment Search Blog Posts News and social media My newsletter has updates on new products courses and events Sign up here Latest blog posts Creative goodness The story of a spoon Spooncarving knife making in Sheffield Do what you love The Man Who Made Things From Trees me on Radio 4 Featured blog posts How to price craft work business advice for craftspeople Which is the best spoon carving knife hook knife any fool can make something more complex but it takes real genius to make things simple again building the world s most iconic viking ship part 1 Welsh love spoons and cawl spoons how to make a new axe handle What is the best knife for wood carving and whittling which is the best axe for carving bushcraft general use how to carve wooden bowls what is the best oil for treating wood Past posts Past posts Select Month April 2016 February 2016 December 2015 November 2015 September 2015 August 2015 June 2015 May 2015 April 2015 March 2015 February
    http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2011/11/16/building-the-worlds-most-iconic-viking-ship-part-5/ (2016-05-01)

  • building the world's most iconic viking ship, part 6 - Robin Wood
    when I look at NWC art and Viking carving I can see similarities in form Often the tools you use tend to create certain forms Again I am afraid I don t know where the original was from but it will be 9th C People sometimes ask me about the quality of tools in earlier periods or even what did they do before they had steel There is a common misconception that steel was invented in the industrial revolution actually it was only the mass production of cheap homogeneous steel which was created by Huntsman s crucible process just down the road form me in Sheffield In Viking times they had excelent steel and knew how to use it much as Japanese sword and tool makers work from detailed knowledge of materials with very simple technology so the Viking smiths created excellent tools and weapons with high carbon steel edges In 1998 I visited the archaeological site of Novgorod in Russia I was mainly there to see medieval bowls but there is much interesting information on tools too This image shows the gradual change in composition of knives over a 500 year period with the black being high carbon steel and the white area being softer tougher iron At a glance it looks as if knives are getting progressively better until you know that level 5 is about 1425 level 28 is 960AD in fact the early knives are the best ones And finally this one is for Kari an archaeological drawing showing one of the small bladed planes most of the ones we used had slightly broader blades but the same principle It seams to be drawn with the blade over the pin but it clearly goes underneath You may also like to read Do what you love Birch bark canoe trip to the boundary waters Teaching and learning in the USA Haddon Hall show preview building the world s most iconic viking ship part 5 building the world s most iconic viking ship part 7 One Response to building the world s most iconic viking ship part 6 Leigh February 13 2015 at 1 23 am Hi Robin could you tell us more about the book from the Viking Ship Museum on Viking woodworking tools I would love to see that book thanks Leigh Reply Leave a Reply Click here to cancel reply Name required Email will not be published required Comment Search Blog Posts News and social media My newsletter has updates on new products courses and events Sign up here Latest blog posts Creative goodness The story of a spoon Spooncarving knife making in Sheffield Do what you love The Man Who Made Things From Trees me on Radio 4 Featured blog posts How to price craft work business advice for craftspeople Which is the best spoon carving knife hook knife any fool can make something more complex but it takes real genius to make things simple again building the world s most iconic viking ship
    http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2011/11/16/building-the-worlds-most-iconic-viking-ship-part-6/ (2016-05-01)

  • building the world's most iconic viking ship, part 7 - Robin Wood
    who have a reasonable skill level saves the shipwrights time in training and supervision Having lots of untrained folk visiting for a few days would actually slow things down rather than help Here is a young blacksmith using the on site forge on a volunteer day And the textile group have 40 volunteers they made the woolen sail and the costumes for the worksite Here they are working on natural dying Public events keep locals and press up to date with progress this is a Viking market day and the opening of the new shop The worksite felt a happy and relaxed place which is important each morning the shipwrights met and Thomas would ask if everyone knew what they were going to do today if they didn t he would allocate work Geir is in the red to the left One thing I did miss compared to the Japanese work site last year was we used to do warm up exercises and stretches each morning which reduced the risk of injury when doing heavy work it was good for creating a feeling of togetherness in the team too Another keen supporter of the project has been Tonsberg youth hostel voted recently as the friendliest youth hostel in the world and I can understand why They have been able to support the project by occasionally offering free accommodation to visiting workers when they are out of season in season they are booked full months in advance This was a huge help to me as the cost of living in Norway is very expensive This was breakfast And to show the cost of living this is 16 worth of groceries from the supermarket I was very grateful for my free breakfast and lunch I resisted the temptation to join friends for a beer at 7 a pint Tonsberg is close to Oslo Torp airport and flights from the UK very reasonable I would highly recommend a visit feel free to email me for contact details if you are planning to go They aim to complete the build by next May and I hope to go back in the spring to see the project develop In the meantime you can keep in touch with progress via the official website here and facebook page As for me my next big project in the spring is helping build a replica of the Bronze age Dover boat Even bigger timbers on that one and bronze tools to work with it will be more of a mix of technologies though with some power tools used to meet the budgets You may also like to read Do what you love Birch bark canoe trip to the boundary waters Teaching and learning in the USA Haddon Hall show preview building the world s most iconic viking ship part 6 entertaining orange No comments yet Leave a Reply Click here to cancel reply Name required Email will not be published required Comment Search Blog Posts News and social media
    http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2011/11/16/building-the-worlds-most-iconic-viking-ship-part-7/ (2016-05-01)

  • Viking ship launch - Robin Wood
    USA The clogmaker s apprentice Birch Bark Canoe build the final chapter Ladder making Morgan car factory visit pots from Pompeii No comments yet Leave a Reply Click here to cancel reply Name required Email will not be published required Comment Search Blog Posts News and social media My newsletter has updates on new products courses and events Sign up here Latest blog posts Creative goodness The story of a spoon Spooncarving knife making in Sheffield Do what you love The Man Who Made Things From Trees me on Radio 4 Featured blog posts How to price craft work business advice for craftspeople Which is the best spoon carving knife hook knife any fool can make something more complex but it takes real genius to make things simple again building the world s most iconic viking ship part 1 Welsh love spoons and cawl spoons how to make a new axe handle What is the best knife for wood carving and whittling which is the best axe for carving bushcraft general use how to carve wooden bowls what is the best oil for treating wood Past posts Past posts Select Month April 2016 February 2016 December 2015 November 2015 September 2015 August 2015 June 2015 May 2015 April 2015 March 2015 February 2015 January 2015 December 2014 November 2014 October 2014 September 2014 August 2014 July 2014 June 2014 May 2014 April 2014 March 2014 February 2014 January 2014 December 2013 November 2013 October 2013 September 2013 July 2013 June 2013 May 2013 April 2013 March 2013 February 2013 January 2013 December 2012 November 2012 October 2012 September 2012 August 2012 July 2012 June 2012 May 2012 April 2012 March 2012 February 2012 January 2012 December 2011 November 2011 October 2011 September 2011 August 2011 July 2011 June 2011 May
    http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2012/06/21/viking-ship-launch/ (2016-05-01)

  • more old woodworking films - Robin Wood
    part 1 One Response to more old woodworking films jarrod November 14 2011 at 7 12 pm I love watching masters at work we can learn so much like the very simple bending jig thanks for the post Reply Leave a Reply Click here to cancel reply Name required Email will not be published required Comment Search Blog Posts News and social media My newsletter has updates on new products courses and events Sign up here Latest blog posts Creative goodness The story of a spoon Spooncarving knife making in Sheffield Do what you love The Man Who Made Things From Trees me on Radio 4 Featured blog posts How to price craft work business advice for craftspeople Which is the best spoon carving knife hook knife any fool can make something more complex but it takes real genius to make things simple again building the world s most iconic viking ship part 1 Welsh love spoons and cawl spoons how to make a new axe handle What is the best knife for wood carving and whittling which is the best axe for carving bushcraft general use how to carve wooden bowls what is the best oil for treating wood Past posts Past posts Select Month April 2016 February 2016 December 2015 November 2015 September 2015 August 2015 June 2015 May 2015 April 2015 March 2015 February 2015 January 2015 December 2014 November 2014 October 2014 September 2014 August 2014 July 2014 June 2014 May 2014 April 2014 March 2014 February 2014 January 2014 December 2013 November 2013 October 2013 September 2013 July 2013 June 2013 May 2013 April 2013 March 2013 February 2013 January 2013 December 2012 November 2012 October 2012 September 2012 August 2012 July 2012 June 2012 May 2012 April 2012 March 2012 February 2012 January 2012
    http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2011/11/14/more-old-woodworking-films/ (2016-05-01)


web-archive-uk.com, 2016-09-27