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  • building the world's most iconic viking ship, part 1 - Robin Wood
    it is more likely to run true and straight get it wrong and the split will run out leaving you with one heavy thick chunk and one too thin to use The important thing is to get as wide a plank as possible by avoiding the split running out as it heads toward the thin centre To do this the shipwrights start by cleaning a 2 wide flat at the centre of the tree scoring a centre line down this with a chisel and then inserting small wooden wedges Only then do they start opening up the split with metal wedges knocked in from the end this is Gregorius And once they are happy they let visitors who s skill level they are not yet sure about have a go 0 This split started to run off on the underside so we started again from the far end this time it ran true It was worth taking the time as the original tree was nearly 1000 and would yield just 16 of the widest planks once the split is going well you can use a bit more force Tim with the big mell The thick wedge this produces is then hewn down to a single plank with a axe planed steamed fitted and finally riveted into place with iron boat nails More on that in the following posts I ll also post about the organisation and running of the project and the gorgeous replica axes and other tools Cleaving timber for ships like this died out Thomas told me in the 1200s we can clearly see that the timbers of earlier ships were cleft and later they were sawn but the art of cleaving wide long boards for shipbuilding was completely lost for 800 years Thomas and the team from Roskilde developed their way of working but no one really knows exactly how the Vikings did it Next stages are hewing the planks part 2 steaming and fitting part 3 riveting or klinking Part 4 carving worksite organisation and funding Part 5 Replica Viking tools Part 6 Overview Part 7 Launch You may also like to read Do what you love Birch bark canoe trip to the boundary waters Teaching and learning in the USA Haddon Hall show preview more old woodworking films building the world s most iconic Viking ship part 2 6 Responses to building the world s most iconic viking ship part 1 doug Fitch November 14 2011 at 11 41 pm Quite amazing My dad built a wooden scale kit model of one of these when I was a kid Reply Gorges Smythe November 15 2011 at 12 25 am Having been raised around a sawmill I find this fscinating Reply Norseman November 15 2011 at 3 15 am Fascinating I look forward to seeing the rest soon Thanks Reply Robin Wood November 16 2011 at 8 46 am glad you are liking it few more posts done now and a couple more to follow Reply
    http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2011/11/14/building-the-worlds-most-iconic-viking-ship-part-1/comment-page-1/ (2016-05-01)


  • building the world's most iconic viking ship, part 1 - Robin Wood
    more likely to run true and straight get it wrong and the split will run out leaving you with one heavy thick chunk and one too thin to use The important thing is to get as wide a plank as possible by avoiding the split running out as it heads toward the thin centre To do this the shipwrights start by cleaning a 2 wide flat at the centre of the tree scoring a centre line down this with a chisel and then inserting small wooden wedges Only then do they start opening up the split with metal wedges knocked in from the end this is Gregorius And once they are happy they let visitors who s skill level they are not yet sure about have a go 0 This split started to run off on the underside so we started again from the far end this time it ran true It was worth taking the time as the original tree was nearly 1000 and would yield just 16 of the widest planks once the split is going well you can use a bit more force Tim with the big mell The thick wedge this produces is then hewn down to a single plank with a axe planed steamed fitted and finally riveted into place with iron boat nails More on that in the following posts I ll also post about the organisation and running of the project and the gorgeous replica axes and other tools Cleaving timber for ships like this died out Thomas told me in the 1200s we can clearly see that the timbers of earlier ships were cleft and later they were sawn but the art of cleaving wide long boards for shipbuilding was completely lost for 800 years Thomas and the team from Roskilde developed their way of working but no one really knows exactly how the Vikings did it Next stages are hewing the planks part 2 steaming and fitting part 3 riveting or klinking Part 4 carving worksite organisation and funding Part 5 Replica Viking tools Part 6 Overview Part 7 Launch You may also like to read Do what you love Birch bark canoe trip to the boundary waters Teaching and learning in the USA Haddon Hall show preview more old woodworking films building the world s most iconic Viking ship part 2 6 Responses to building the world s most iconic viking ship part 1 doug Fitch November 14 2011 at 11 41 pm Quite amazing My dad built a wooden scale kit model of one of these when I was a kid Reply Gorges Smythe November 15 2011 at 12 25 am Having been raised around a sawmill I find this fscinating Reply Norseman November 15 2011 at 3 15 am Fascinating I look forward to seeing the rest soon Thanks Reply Robin Wood November 16 2011 at 8 46 am glad you are liking it few more posts done now and a couple more to follow Reply Ted Banford
    http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2011/11/14/building-the-worlds-most-iconic-viking-ship-part-1/?replytocom=3266 (2016-05-01)

  • building the world's most iconic viking ship, part 1 - Robin Wood
    is more likely to run true and straight get it wrong and the split will run out leaving you with one heavy thick chunk and one too thin to use The important thing is to get as wide a plank as possible by avoiding the split running out as it heads toward the thin centre To do this the shipwrights start by cleaning a 2 wide flat at the centre of the tree scoring a centre line down this with a chisel and then inserting small wooden wedges Only then do they start opening up the split with metal wedges knocked in from the end this is Gregorius And once they are happy they let visitors who s skill level they are not yet sure about have a go 0 This split started to run off on the underside so we started again from the far end this time it ran true It was worth taking the time as the original tree was nearly 1000 and would yield just 16 of the widest planks once the split is going well you can use a bit more force Tim with the big mell The thick wedge this produces is then hewn down to a single plank with a axe planed steamed fitted and finally riveted into place with iron boat nails More on that in the following posts I ll also post about the organisation and running of the project and the gorgeous replica axes and other tools Cleaving timber for ships like this died out Thomas told me in the 1200s we can clearly see that the timbers of earlier ships were cleft and later they were sawn but the art of cleaving wide long boards for shipbuilding was completely lost for 800 years Thomas and the team from Roskilde developed their way of working but no one really knows exactly how the Vikings did it Next stages are hewing the planks part 2 steaming and fitting part 3 riveting or klinking Part 4 carving worksite organisation and funding Part 5 Replica Viking tools Part 6 Overview Part 7 Launch You may also like to read Do what you love Birch bark canoe trip to the boundary waters Teaching and learning in the USA Haddon Hall show preview more old woodworking films building the world s most iconic Viking ship part 2 6 Responses to building the world s most iconic viking ship part 1 doug Fitch November 14 2011 at 11 41 pm Quite amazing My dad built a wooden scale kit model of one of these when I was a kid Reply Gorges Smythe November 15 2011 at 12 25 am Having been raised around a sawmill I find this fscinating Reply Norseman November 15 2011 at 3 15 am Fascinating I look forward to seeing the rest soon Thanks Reply Robin Wood November 16 2011 at 8 46 am glad you are liking it few more posts done now and a couple more to follow Reply Ted
    http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2011/11/14/building-the-worlds-most-iconic-viking-ship-part-1/?replytocom=3268 (2016-05-01)


  • learning how to sharpen a knife properly - Robin Wood
    own equipment at home This is very empowering We had been chatting about how many folk buy new tools and fear taking them to the stone the first time in case they make them worse Once you have taken a clearly blunt and damaged knife into a state where it will produce a mirror polish on the wood it cuts you loose all that fear More about Japanese sharpening from my blog when I visited Japan and worked with traditional carpenters last year You may also like to read Spooncarving knife making in Sheffield Sharing craft at North House Folk School Teaching and learning in the USA How to use a hook knife to carve the bowl of a spoon using woodware in the kitchen and at table Welsh love spoons and cawl spoons One Response to learning how to sharpen a knife properly urbanbodger October 27 2011 at 9 31 am Great stuff Robin Proper sharpening techniques means it becomes much less of a chore and the sense of satisfaction of knowing that you can make much cleaner and precise cuts It all translates into more time making stuff than worrying about whether your tools are up to the job Reply Leave a Reply Click here to cancel reply Name required Email will not be published required Comment Search Blog Posts News and social media My newsletter has updates on new products courses and events Sign up here Latest blog posts Creative goodness The story of a spoon Spooncarving knife making in Sheffield Do what you love The Man Who Made Things From Trees me on Radio 4 Featured blog posts How to price craft work business advice for craftspeople Which is the best spoon carving knife hook knife any fool can make something more complex but it takes
    http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2011/10/25/learning-how-to-sharpen-a-knife-properly/ (2016-05-01)

  • woodcarving course shrink pots and kuksa - Robin Wood
    the three day course I do feel really privileged to be able to make a living whilst sharing such special times with wonderful people You may also like to read The story of a spoon Spooncarving knife making in Sheffield Sharing craft at North House Folk School Teaching and learning in the USA Welsh love spoons and cawl spoons 1373 opportunities to go wrong No comments yet Leave a Reply Click here to cancel reply Name required Email will not be published required Comment Search Blog Posts News and social media My newsletter has updates on new products courses and events Sign up here Latest blog posts Creative goodness The story of a spoon Spooncarving knife making in Sheffield Do what you love The Man Who Made Things From Trees me on Radio 4 Featured blog posts How to price craft work business advice for craftspeople Which is the best spoon carving knife hook knife any fool can make something more complex but it takes real genius to make things simple again building the world s most iconic viking ship part 1 Welsh love spoons and cawl spoons how to make a new axe handle What is the best knife for wood carving and whittling which is the best axe for carving bushcraft general use how to carve wooden bowls what is the best oil for treating wood Past posts Past posts Select Month April 2016 February 2016 December 2015 November 2015 September 2015 August 2015 June 2015 May 2015 April 2015 March 2015 February 2015 January 2015 December 2014 November 2014 October 2014 September 2014 August 2014 July 2014 June 2014 May 2014 April 2014 March 2014 February 2014 January 2014 December 2013 November 2013 October 2013 September 2013 July 2013 June 2013 May 2013 April 2013 March 2013
    http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2011/10/29/woodcarving-course-shrink-pots-and-kuksa/ (2016-05-01)

  • love spoon
    And now to give you an authentic Welsh voice talking about cawl spoons I rather like this youtube You may also like to read The story of a spoon Spooncarving knife making in Sheffield Spoon carving tools giveaway competition Gransfors bruks carving axe wildlife hatchet and Robin Wood carving axe compared learning how to sharpen a knife properly woodcarving course shrink pots and kuksa 12 Responses to Welsh love spoons and cawl spoons Le Loup October 28 2011 at 10 41 pm Last time I was in the UK I tried to find a love spoon to buy for my wife Never found any Keith http woodsrunnersdiary blogspot com Reply Gorges Smythe October 29 2011 at 12 34 am Interesting stuff Reply Rhugl October 29 2011 at 12 04 pm Good article on a slightly mis understood subject Spoons were given not just as a token of love but were offered in much the same way as an engagement ring is nowadays The girl might be offered several spoons but would only take the one that appealed the most As you say there were several messages conveyed in the spoon itself some of which would suggest the man s virility etc On the acceptance of the spoon it was taken that there was a commitment made and a suggestion offered of the delights to come when they were married Hence the Wenglish terms spooning love making and sboner lover Cawl spoons were not referred to as llwyau spoons but were called a lletwad ladle A lletwad bach was a small ladle for eating your cawl and a lletwad mawr was for getting the cawl out of the cauldron The lletwad mawr had a hook on the end for hanging on the rim of the cauldron Whilst I agree that there are many variations of cawl what is described here is closer to a lob scouse traditionally served in the northern parts of Wales Cawl traditionally had none or very little meat and was usually based on ham or mutton bones boiled slowly on a cooking range or open fire over several days skimmed often The vegetables were added directly to the broth and would not have included such things as peppercorns Finally there are still spoons crafted by hand in Wales allthough maybe not commercially I will try to find some names Spoons were crafted by a Twca Cam a bent dirk or cleaver usually made in recent times out of used cut throat razors Reply Rhugl October 29 2011 at 8 06 pm Robin check this out http www 18531 com 2007 03 really making polyandry family pretty talented hostess Reply Robin Wood October 29 2011 at 8 55 pm Rhugi thanks for that interesting comment I was particularly grateful to know lletwad bach When you talk about the meaning of the gift eg On the acceptance of the spoon it was taken that there was a commitment made what is the source of your information There is clearly
    http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2011/10/28/welsh-love-spoons-and-cawl-spoons/comment-page-1/ (2016-05-01)

  • love spoon
    now to give you an authentic Welsh voice talking about cawl spoons I rather like this youtube You may also like to read The story of a spoon Spooncarving knife making in Sheffield Spoon carving tools giveaway competition Gransfors bruks carving axe wildlife hatchet and Robin Wood carving axe compared learning how to sharpen a knife properly woodcarving course shrink pots and kuksa 12 Responses to Welsh love spoons and cawl spoons Le Loup October 28 2011 at 10 41 pm Last time I was in the UK I tried to find a love spoon to buy for my wife Never found any Keith http woodsrunnersdiary blogspot com Reply Gorges Smythe October 29 2011 at 12 34 am Interesting stuff Reply Rhugl October 29 2011 at 12 04 pm Good article on a slightly mis understood subject Spoons were given not just as a token of love but were offered in much the same way as an engagement ring is nowadays The girl might be offered several spoons but would only take the one that appealed the most As you say there were several messages conveyed in the spoon itself some of which would suggest the man s virility etc On the acceptance of the spoon it was taken that there was a commitment made and a suggestion offered of the delights to come when they were married Hence the Wenglish terms spooning love making and sboner lover Cawl spoons were not referred to as llwyau spoons but were called a lletwad ladle A lletwad bach was a small ladle for eating your cawl and a lletwad mawr was for getting the cawl out of the cauldron The lletwad mawr had a hook on the end for hanging on the rim of the cauldron Whilst I agree that there are many variations of cawl what is described here is closer to a lob scouse traditionally served in the northern parts of Wales Cawl traditionally had none or very little meat and was usually based on ham or mutton bones boiled slowly on a cooking range or open fire over several days skimmed often The vegetables were added directly to the broth and would not have included such things as peppercorns Finally there are still spoons crafted by hand in Wales allthough maybe not commercially I will try to find some names Spoons were crafted by a Twca Cam a bent dirk or cleaver usually made in recent times out of used cut throat razors Reply Rhugl October 29 2011 at 8 06 pm Robin check this out http www 18531 com 2007 03 really making polyandry family pretty talented hostess Reply Robin Wood October 29 2011 at 8 55 pm Rhugi thanks for that interesting comment I was particularly grateful to know lletwad bach When you talk about the meaning of the gift eg On the acceptance of the spoon it was taken that there was a commitment made what is the source of your information There is clearly so
    http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2011/10/28/welsh-love-spoons-and-cawl-spoons/?replytocom=3241 (2016-05-01)

  • love spoon
    now to give you an authentic Welsh voice talking about cawl spoons I rather like this youtube You may also like to read The story of a spoon Spooncarving knife making in Sheffield Spoon carving tools giveaway competition Gransfors bruks carving axe wildlife hatchet and Robin Wood carving axe compared learning how to sharpen a knife properly woodcarving course shrink pots and kuksa 12 Responses to Welsh love spoons and cawl spoons Le Loup October 28 2011 at 10 41 pm Last time I was in the UK I tried to find a love spoon to buy for my wife Never found any Keith http woodsrunnersdiary blogspot com Reply Gorges Smythe October 29 2011 at 12 34 am Interesting stuff Reply Rhugl October 29 2011 at 12 04 pm Good article on a slightly mis understood subject Spoons were given not just as a token of love but were offered in much the same way as an engagement ring is nowadays The girl might be offered several spoons but would only take the one that appealed the most As you say there were several messages conveyed in the spoon itself some of which would suggest the man s virility etc On the acceptance of the spoon it was taken that there was a commitment made and a suggestion offered of the delights to come when they were married Hence the Wenglish terms spooning love making and sboner lover Cawl spoons were not referred to as llwyau spoons but were called a lletwad ladle A lletwad bach was a small ladle for eating your cawl and a lletwad mawr was for getting the cawl out of the cauldron The lletwad mawr had a hook on the end for hanging on the rim of the cauldron Whilst I agree that there are many variations of cawl what is described here is closer to a lob scouse traditionally served in the northern parts of Wales Cawl traditionally had none or very little meat and was usually based on ham or mutton bones boiled slowly on a cooking range or open fire over several days skimmed often The vegetables were added directly to the broth and would not have included such things as peppercorns Finally there are still spoons crafted by hand in Wales allthough maybe not commercially I will try to find some names Spoons were crafted by a Twca Cam a bent dirk or cleaver usually made in recent times out of used cut throat razors Reply Rhugl October 29 2011 at 8 06 pm Robin check this out http www 18531 com 2007 03 really making polyandry family pretty talented hostess Reply Robin Wood October 29 2011 at 8 55 pm Rhugi thanks for that interesting comment I was particularly grateful to know lletwad bach When you talk about the meaning of the gift eg On the acceptance of the spoon it was taken that there was a commitment made what is the source of your information There is clearly so
    http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2011/10/28/welsh-love-spoons-and-cawl-spoons/?replytocom=3243 (2016-05-01)


web-archive-uk.com, 2016-09-28