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  • love spoon
    to give you an authentic Welsh voice talking about cawl spoons I rather like this youtube You may also like to read The story of a spoon Spooncarving knife making in Sheffield Spoon carving tools giveaway competition Gransfors bruks carving axe wildlife hatchet and Robin Wood carving axe compared learning how to sharpen a knife properly woodcarving course shrink pots and kuksa 12 Responses to Welsh love spoons and cawl spoons Le Loup October 28 2011 at 10 41 pm Last time I was in the UK I tried to find a love spoon to buy for my wife Never found any Keith http woodsrunnersdiary blogspot com Reply Gorges Smythe October 29 2011 at 12 34 am Interesting stuff Reply Rhugl October 29 2011 at 12 04 pm Good article on a slightly mis understood subject Spoons were given not just as a token of love but were offered in much the same way as an engagement ring is nowadays The girl might be offered several spoons but would only take the one that appealed the most As you say there were several messages conveyed in the spoon itself some of which would suggest the man s virility etc On the acceptance of the spoon it was taken that there was a commitment made and a suggestion offered of the delights to come when they were married Hence the Wenglish terms spooning love making and sboner lover Cawl spoons were not referred to as llwyau spoons but were called a lletwad ladle A lletwad bach was a small ladle for eating your cawl and a lletwad mawr was for getting the cawl out of the cauldron The lletwad mawr had a hook on the end for hanging on the rim of the cauldron Whilst I agree that there are many variations of cawl what is described here is closer to a lob scouse traditionally served in the northern parts of Wales Cawl traditionally had none or very little meat and was usually based on ham or mutton bones boiled slowly on a cooking range or open fire over several days skimmed often The vegetables were added directly to the broth and would not have included such things as peppercorns Finally there are still spoons crafted by hand in Wales allthough maybe not commercially I will try to find some names Spoons were crafted by a Twca Cam a bent dirk or cleaver usually made in recent times out of used cut throat razors Reply Rhugl October 29 2011 at 8 06 pm Robin check this out http www 18531 com 2007 03 really making polyandry family pretty talented hostess Reply Robin Wood October 29 2011 at 8 55 pm Rhugi thanks for that interesting comment I was particularly grateful to know lletwad bach When you talk about the meaning of the gift eg On the acceptance of the spoon it was taken that there was a commitment made what is the source of your information There is clearly so much
    http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2011/10/28/welsh-love-spoons-and-cawl-spoons/?replytocom=3248 (2016-05-01)


  • love spoon
    give you an authentic Welsh voice talking about cawl spoons I rather like this youtube You may also like to read The story of a spoon Spooncarving knife making in Sheffield Spoon carving tools giveaway competition Gransfors bruks carving axe wildlife hatchet and Robin Wood carving axe compared learning how to sharpen a knife properly woodcarving course shrink pots and kuksa 12 Responses to Welsh love spoons and cawl spoons Le Loup October 28 2011 at 10 41 pm Last time I was in the UK I tried to find a love spoon to buy for my wife Never found any Keith http woodsrunnersdiary blogspot com Reply Gorges Smythe October 29 2011 at 12 34 am Interesting stuff Reply Rhugl October 29 2011 at 12 04 pm Good article on a slightly mis understood subject Spoons were given not just as a token of love but were offered in much the same way as an engagement ring is nowadays The girl might be offered several spoons but would only take the one that appealed the most As you say there were several messages conveyed in the spoon itself some of which would suggest the man s virility etc On the acceptance of the spoon it was taken that there was a commitment made and a suggestion offered of the delights to come when they were married Hence the Wenglish terms spooning love making and sboner lover Cawl spoons were not referred to as llwyau spoons but were called a lletwad ladle A lletwad bach was a small ladle for eating your cawl and a lletwad mawr was for getting the cawl out of the cauldron The lletwad mawr had a hook on the end for hanging on the rim of the cauldron Whilst I agree that there are many variations of cawl what is described here is closer to a lob scouse traditionally served in the northern parts of Wales Cawl traditionally had none or very little meat and was usually based on ham or mutton bones boiled slowly on a cooking range or open fire over several days skimmed often The vegetables were added directly to the broth and would not have included such things as peppercorns Finally there are still spoons crafted by hand in Wales allthough maybe not commercially I will try to find some names Spoons were crafted by a Twca Cam a bent dirk or cleaver usually made in recent times out of used cut throat razors Reply Rhugl October 29 2011 at 8 06 pm Robin check this out http www 18531 com 2007 03 really making polyandry family pretty talented hostess Reply Robin Wood October 29 2011 at 8 55 pm Rhugi thanks for that interesting comment I was particularly grateful to know lletwad bach When you talk about the meaning of the gift eg On the acceptance of the spoon it was taken that there was a commitment made what is the source of your information There is clearly so much Victorian
    http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2011/10/28/welsh-love-spoons-and-cawl-spoons/?replytocom=245073 (2016-05-01)

  • axes Archives - Robin Wood
    love axes I love to see them forged and I love the sort of ingenious technology that people came up with in the late nineteenth early twentieth century It feels to me there was a sweet spot in technology that involved a lot of skill in the maker before full mechanisation removed most of Continue Reading 0 John Neeman carving axe Robin Wood edition By Robin Wood on October 10 2013 in axes philosophy I am a man who owns too many axes it must be around 100 or so including a dozen by Gransfors Bruks many antique English ones from the heyday or the British tool industry and perhaps some of my favourites a dozen or so antique hand forged laminated Japanese axes I use axes every day Continue Reading 35 juggling with axes and other fun stuff By Robin Wood on July 14 2013 in axes Uncategorized Most blog readers will know I enjoy using a well balanced axe probably not many know I am also a keen juggler and have lots of friends who were profesional performers I once rode my unicycle around the top of the world trade centre So you can imagine my excitement when I saw a show advertised bringing Continue Reading 1 casting bronze axes and adzes By Robin Wood on April 29 2012 in axes other woodwork Uncategorized Now I have been working with bronze axes and adzes every day for 2 months and have answered many questions about how to set up the edges and haft them efficiently There are lots more questions I would love to explore but shall not have the time about the metallurgy of bronze We did get Continue Reading 0 Bronze age woodworking tools early thoughts By Robin Wood on March 12 2012 in axes other
    http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/category/axes/ (2016-05-01)


  • how to fit a new axe handle - Robin Wood
    dry is important so I keep a supply of dry cleft oak siting near the fireplace Imagine the wedge going a little more than half way through the head at that point on the wedge you want it to be thick enough to take up all the gap between head and handle and a bit more to allow for a healthy compression The end of the wedge I shape to have about 1mm flat then chamfer from both sides at 45 degrees this makes a strong but sharp leading edge to go into your split head stand the axe up on a solid block of floor and hammer the wedge in until there is no more movement It should take up all the gap and make a tight fit Saw it off if there is some gap front and back you can make a small split across the handle and either bang in another wooden wedge or if its just a small gap one of those metal hammer wedges I always tend to use wood as it makes life easier when you need to drill the handle out to replace it Small gaps front and back are no problem if your main wedge has gone in well the pressure side to side is imense and it will not move So at the top is my favourite GB carving axe about 70 below a very good second best the head cost 2 took 5 minutes to grind and sharpen with power tools and the handle took maybe a little more than an hour all told certainly a lot less time than photographing and typing this tutorial Shame I don t do leatherwork really or I could do a tutorial on a nice sheath for it You may also like to read Grinding an axe the Sheffield way Spoon carving tools giveaway competition Gransfors bruks carving axe wildlife hatchet and Robin Wood carving axe compared How to sharpen an axe cool woodworking tool Thanks for a great 2010 and best wishes for 2011 6 Responses to how to fit a new axe handle Tico Vogt December 19 2010 at 1 18 am Hi Robin In the 13th photo where you discuss the shaping and profile of the wedge is that the wedge viewed from the side It looks very narrow in relation to the axe head Best Tico Reply Robin Wood December 19 2010 at 8 33 am Hi Tico yes viewed from side it is quite narrow as the handle is a fairly tight fit in the head anyway if there was a bigger gap around the handle in the eye I would use a fatter wedge You can see when driven in it still left a significant width of wedge showing everything compresses a lot Reply Jonni southwood January 7 2011 at 3 39 pm hi Robin Excellent i bought an old axe head a few years ago at a craft fair and have never quite been happy with the
    http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2010/12/18/how-to-fit-a-new-axe-handle/ (2016-05-01)

  • Grinding an axe the Sheffield way - Robin Wood
    Reply Ray March 10 2015 at 7 26 am Hi Robin Did you have any articles about how to dry the bowl which made of wet wood It s easy to crack when I finish the bowl Because the day with low humidity here Dali China Looking forward to your reply Thanks Ray Reply Robin Wood March 16 2015 at 5 33 pm I don t have online articles but that issue is covered well in my book the wooden bowl Bowls do not crack due to fast drying they crack due to incorrect conversion from the log The main tip is to cut the central growth rings out of the tree and throw it away the wood at the sides away from the pith is much more stable Reply Leave a Reply Click here to cancel reply Name required Email will not be published required Comment Search Blog Posts News and social media My newsletter has updates on new products courses and events Sign up here Latest blog posts Creative goodness The story of a spoon Spooncarving knife making in Sheffield Do what you love The Man Who Made Things From Trees me on Radio 4 Featured blog posts How to price craft work business advice for craftspeople Which is the best spoon carving knife hook knife any fool can make something more complex but it takes real genius to make things simple again building the world s most iconic viking ship part 1 Welsh love spoons and cawl spoons how to make a new axe handle What is the best knife for wood carving and whittling which is the best axe for carving bushcraft general use how to carve wooden bowls what is the best oil for treating wood Past posts Past posts Select Month April 2016 February
    http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2015/02/17/grinding-axe-sheffield-way/ (2016-05-01)

  • Walsall Saddlers, Frank Baines - Robin Wood
    many different types in different parts These are the cutting tools honed to a good edge on a leather strop Rolls of softer leather I can still smell it just seeing the pictures Cutting out Then follows an awful lot of hand stitching Each saddler has a workbench and works on a single saddle through all the stages Frank has his bench alongside and spends more time at the bench than in the office It is clearly hard work on the forearms as everyone had muscles like Popeye This mushroom like tool was used to beat the saddle to help pull stitches really tight Like this Now I don t know anything about saddles but last night when I told a horse loving friend where I had been she was very envious Frank Baines is clearly the Rolls Royce of dressage saddles I took a couple of short video clips showing work in progress and a view around the workshop It was a joy to see Frank and his team at work the commitment to quality and tradition whilst still being open to change and improvement This is their website You may also like to read The clogmaker s apprentice Film about one of Britain s greatest living potters Astonishing film about making Ladder making flat plane woodcarving how to make a new axe handle 3 Responses to Walsall Saddlers Frank Baines pegsandtails December 15 2010 at 6 42 am Thank you for posting this The quality of materials and workmanship is obvious Jack Reply flyingshavings December 15 2010 at 8 20 am Very interesting and great that this is carried on I was wondering what the cutting bench surface is to prevent blunting of the knives Reply Graeme November 22 2013 at 7 05 am The mushroom shaped tool was called a potato masher by the saddler my partner assisted for a while that might have been a joke or peculiar to us Antipodeans but there must be a technical term The interesting thing though is that he had 2 1 was caste alloy and the other turned from a whole stem of Lignum vitae and that was something else altogether Reply Leave a Reply Click here to cancel reply Name required Email will not be published required Comment Search Blog Posts News and social media My newsletter has updates on new products courses and events Sign up here Latest blog posts Creative goodness The story of a spoon Spooncarving knife making in Sheffield Do what you love The Man Who Made Things From Trees me on Radio 4 Featured blog posts How to price craft work business advice for craftspeople Which is the best spoon carving knife hook knife any fool can make something more complex but it takes real genius to make things simple again building the world s most iconic viking ship part 1 Welsh love spoons and cawl spoons how to make a new axe handle What is the best knife for wood carving and
    http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2010/12/14/walsall-saddlers-frank-baines/ (2016-05-01)

  • cool woodworking tool - Robin Wood
    unavailable March 18 2011 at 3 28 am BridgeCity is a well known tool vendor that 1 has neat stuff and 2 charges for themEven though they are right down the road I don t think I have ever bought anything from them Mostly I just look at their stuff and say WOW Reply Leave a Reply Click here to cancel reply Name required Email will not be published required Comment Search Blog Posts News and social media My newsletter has updates on new products courses and events Sign up here Latest blog posts Creative goodness The story of a spoon Spooncarving knife making in Sheffield Do what you love The Man Who Made Things From Trees me on Radio 4 Featured blog posts How to price craft work business advice for craftspeople Which is the best spoon carving knife hook knife any fool can make something more complex but it takes real genius to make things simple again building the world s most iconic viking ship part 1 Welsh love spoons and cawl spoons how to make a new axe handle What is the best knife for wood carving and whittling which is the best axe for carving bushcraft general use how to carve wooden bowls what is the best oil for treating wood Past posts Past posts Select Month April 2016 February 2016 December 2015 November 2015 September 2015 August 2015 June 2015 May 2015 April 2015 March 2015 February 2015 January 2015 December 2014 November 2014 October 2014 September 2014 August 2014 July 2014 June 2014 May 2014 April 2014 March 2014 February 2014 January 2014 December 2013 November 2013 October 2013 September 2013 July 2013 June 2013 May 2013 April 2013 March 2013 February 2013 January 2013 December 2012 November 2012 October 2012 September 2012 August
    http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2010/12/18/cool-woodworking-tool/ (2016-05-01)

  • axe handle
    the handle And we leave it to dry This bit of wood was pretty dry already so 48 hours indoors will probably be enough When it is dry if I tap it against something it will ring rather than thud and feel nice and springy You can just leave it a month and be sure but I am always impatient This is roughly how it will look when done This is a cheap old head I don t know what the pattern is or where they were made but I have a couple like this they don t seem uncommon at car boots and I like the look of it as a carving hatchet The other old head would make a perfect alternative to a small forest axe for someone on a budget See how to fit the axe handle here You may also like to read Teaching and learning in the USA Grinding an axe the Sheffield way Spoon carving tools giveaway competition Gransfors bruks carving axe wildlife hatchet and Robin Wood carving axe compared Walsall Saddlers Frank Baines cool woodworking tool 3 Responses to how to make a new axe handle Eric Rucker May 6 2014 at 1 24 pm Hello Robin What a lovely generous empowering post I especially appreciate how you share not only what you have learned from experience but the reasons and parameters of what you think is the math behind the solution in order that we can enter into the process for ourselves and start to see and notice the sorts of things a beginner might not otherwise Are you familiar with Bill Coperthwaite s work to design a Democratic Axe In that case he was addressing the scarcity of affordable new or good quality second hand broad axes http www motherearthnews com diy how to make an axe zmaz05fmzsel aspx axzz30wPUIFE5 I think this post of yours is a good complement to his idea In your case helping others tap into the ready supply of decent used hatchet heads Thank you Eric Reply Jim Carpenter September 8 2014 at 1 23 pm From the Appalachian Mountains in Kentucky Great article since I have trouble finding good handles for any if my tools Have been carving for 30 yes so I will jump in and make my own Thanks Robin for your desire to share Jim Reply Joe October 14 2015 at 3 51 pm Thanks for providing the steps required I m just about to carve a handle for a felling axe for a friend and this will help with what I need to do However this is the first time I have attempted carving something like this and I want to make a good job of it I have a Gransfors axe at home which I ll be using to do the job and notice that it has ridges where the grip area of the handle is and I wanted to replicate that on the handle that i carve Do you
    http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2010/12/14/how-to-make-a-new-axe-handle/comment-page-1/ (2016-05-01)


web-archive-uk.com, 2016-09-27