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  • axe handle
    And we leave it to dry This bit of wood was pretty dry already so 48 hours indoors will probably be enough When it is dry if I tap it against something it will ring rather than thud and feel nice and springy You can just leave it a month and be sure but I am always impatient This is roughly how it will look when done This is a cheap old head I don t know what the pattern is or where they were made but I have a couple like this they don t seem uncommon at car boots and I like the look of it as a carving hatchet The other old head would make a perfect alternative to a small forest axe for someone on a budget See how to fit the axe handle here You may also like to read Teaching and learning in the USA Grinding an axe the Sheffield way Spoon carving tools giveaway competition Gransfors bruks carving axe wildlife hatchet and Robin Wood carving axe compared Walsall Saddlers Frank Baines cool woodworking tool 3 Responses to how to make a new axe handle Eric Rucker May 6 2014 at 1 24 pm Hello Robin What a lovely generous empowering post I especially appreciate how you share not only what you have learned from experience but the reasons and parameters of what you think is the math behind the solution in order that we can enter into the process for ourselves and start to see and notice the sorts of things a beginner might not otherwise Are you familiar with Bill Coperthwaite s work to design a Democratic Axe In that case he was addressing the scarcity of affordable new or good quality second hand broad axes http www motherearthnews com diy how to make an axe zmaz05fmzsel aspx axzz30wPUIFE5 I think this post of yours is a good complement to his idea In your case helping others tap into the ready supply of decent used hatchet heads Thank you Eric Reply Jim Carpenter September 8 2014 at 1 23 pm From the Appalachian Mountains in Kentucky Great article since I have trouble finding good handles for any if my tools Have been carving for 30 yes so I will jump in and make my own Thanks Robin for your desire to share Jim Reply Joe October 14 2015 at 3 51 pm Thanks for providing the steps required I m just about to carve a handle for a felling axe for a friend and this will help with what I need to do However this is the first time I have attempted carving something like this and I want to make a good job of it I have a Gransfors axe at home which I ll be using to do the job and notice that it has ridges where the grip area of the handle is and I wanted to replicate that on the handle that i carve Do you know how

    Original URL path: http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2010/12/14/how-to-make-a-new-axe-handle/?replytocom=69226 (2016-05-01)
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  • axe handle
    handle And we leave it to dry This bit of wood was pretty dry already so 48 hours indoors will probably be enough When it is dry if I tap it against something it will ring rather than thud and feel nice and springy You can just leave it a month and be sure but I am always impatient This is roughly how it will look when done This is a cheap old head I don t know what the pattern is or where they were made but I have a couple like this they don t seem uncommon at car boots and I like the look of it as a carving hatchet The other old head would make a perfect alternative to a small forest axe for someone on a budget See how to fit the axe handle here You may also like to read Teaching and learning in the USA Grinding an axe the Sheffield way Spoon carving tools giveaway competition Gransfors bruks carving axe wildlife hatchet and Robin Wood carving axe compared Walsall Saddlers Frank Baines cool woodworking tool 3 Responses to how to make a new axe handle Eric Rucker May 6 2014 at 1 24 pm Hello Robin What a lovely generous empowering post I especially appreciate how you share not only what you have learned from experience but the reasons and parameters of what you think is the math behind the solution in order that we can enter into the process for ourselves and start to see and notice the sorts of things a beginner might not otherwise Are you familiar with Bill Coperthwaite s work to design a Democratic Axe In that case he was addressing the scarcity of affordable new or good quality second hand broad axes http www motherearthnews com diy how to make an axe zmaz05fmzsel aspx axzz30wPUIFE5 I think this post of yours is a good complement to his idea In your case helping others tap into the ready supply of decent used hatchet heads Thank you Eric Reply Jim Carpenter September 8 2014 at 1 23 pm From the Appalachian Mountains in Kentucky Great article since I have trouble finding good handles for any if my tools Have been carving for 30 yes so I will jump in and make my own Thanks Robin for your desire to share Jim Reply Joe October 14 2015 at 3 51 pm Thanks for providing the steps required I m just about to carve a handle for a felling axe for a friend and this will help with what I need to do However this is the first time I have attempted carving something like this and I want to make a good job of it I have a Gransfors axe at home which I ll be using to do the job and notice that it has ridges where the grip area of the handle is and I wanted to replicate that on the handle that i carve Do you know

    Original URL path: http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2010/12/14/how-to-make-a-new-axe-handle/?replytocom=244708 (2016-05-01)
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  • Crafts are valuable parts of our our Heritage - Robin Wood
    for the years of hard work mastering difficult skills is enough Just to compare how big a step this is have a look back at a few blog posts showing attitudes to traditional crafts from just last year This was the adjournment debate we initiated last year http www theyworkforyou com debates id 2009 06 25c 1036 0 and a blog post from Jan 2009 it seems incredible that we have come so far so quickly http greenwood carving blogspot com 2009 01 campaign for traditional crafts html You may also like to read Do what you love Birch bark canoe trip to the boundary waters Haddon Hall show preview Six happy years special Christmas present What is the best knife for wood carving and whittling No comments yet Leave a Reply Click here to cancel reply Name required Email will not be published required Comment Search Blog Posts News and social media My newsletter has updates on new products courses and events Sign up here Latest blog posts Creative goodness The story of a spoon Spooncarving knife making in Sheffield Do what you love The Man Who Made Things From Trees me on Radio 4 Featured blog posts How to price craft work business advice for craftspeople Which is the best spoon carving knife hook knife any fool can make something more complex but it takes real genius to make things simple again building the world s most iconic viking ship part 1 Welsh love spoons and cawl spoons how to make a new axe handle What is the best knife for wood carving and whittling which is the best axe for carving bushcraft general use how to carve wooden bowls what is the best oil for treating wood Past posts Past posts Select Month April 2016 February 2016

    Original URL path: http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2010/11/23/crafts-are-valuable-parts-of-our-our-heritage/ (2016-05-01)
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  • Last of the summer wine - Robin Wood
    Peter Sallis as the voice of Wallace as in Wallace and Gromit You may also like to read Do what you love Birch bark canoe trip to the boundary waters Haddon Hall show preview Six happy years What is the best knife for wood carving and whittling end of the line for historic boatbuilding in Faversham 3 Responses to Last of the summer wine Jim Tabor November 30 2010 at 1 52 am I love that show and watch it ever Saturday night on our PBS station Last weekend My Dad 72 and my Brother and myself spent time sitting around the wood stove and talking those are times to cherish Reply editor December 2 2010 at 1 38 am The photos of your trip are beautiful Is there still an active slate industry in the area Reply Robin Wood December 2 2010 at 8 46 am editor yes indeed though not in Langdale I ll do another post with links and vids Reply Leave a Reply Click here to cancel reply Name required Email will not be published required Comment Search Blog Posts News and social media My newsletter has updates on new products courses and events Sign up here Latest blog posts Creative goodness The story of a spoon Spooncarving knife making in Sheffield Do what you love The Man Who Made Things From Trees me on Radio 4 Featured blog posts How to price craft work business advice for craftspeople Which is the best spoon carving knife hook knife any fool can make something more complex but it takes real genius to make things simple again building the world s most iconic viking ship part 1 Welsh love spoons and cawl spoons how to make a new axe handle What is the best knife for wood carving

    Original URL path: http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2010/11/29/last-of-the-summer-wine/ (2016-05-01)
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  • what is the best knife for wood carving and whittling? Robin Wood
    the convex edge to smooth the wide surface I liken it to a plane iron having an cambered edge Anyway thought I would throw that out there Your right though because for the most part I do about half to two third of a spoon with either my Del Stubbs regular sloyd and an a narrow Mora knife one that because narrowed by sharpening more narrow than the 120 Reply Robin Wood December 12 2010 at 9 37 am Thanks for the comments DIY Pocket knives can be used for carving but they all have a secondary bevel which means you do not get the effect of being able to control the cut by running the big primary bevel on the wood Refsal knives are great for what they are designed for flat plane carving in soft woods I love the work of Axel Peterson but most flat plane carving done today I find a bit twee Tim No I don t hollow grind I have a Tormek so I easily could I sharpen Japanese style a single flat bevel on waterstones I occasionally use a larger knife for roughing out and asked Del to make the large sloyd which is now part of his range In practice though I find I seem to end up using a 106 all the time There is no right answer it s a question of what works for you and for me as often as not it is just the closest knife I lay my hands on and I have lots of 106 s Reply T L Cooper December 22 2010 at 6 35 pm Okay well the reason I ask Is that have try on and off over the past 7 or so years hollowing grinding knifes The idea is to save time But so far most of the time it doesn t I often don t get a very good grind Which takes more time to remove And I often end up with a nearly flat grind anyways So I guess I m wondering is this same reason you do not hollow grind your knives Reply Robin Wood December 22 2010 at 6 43 pm I guess so when anyone sharpens they want a good edge for the work they do in as short a time as possible I am always experimenting with sharpening but currently I am liking using only waterstones I can hollow grind on the tormek but I don t so much like using jigs and the wheel is too small to grind well freehand I have recently bought an old wet waterstone grinder 2 foot in diameter which is easier to freehand grind on but won t leave much of a hollow on a small knife I think most professional knife makers now are using belts and if they want hollow they us a contact wheel This followed by a quick touch on the buffing wheel gives a good edge in very little time Reply T L Cooper December 22 2010 at 7 06 pm That s for sure I think some people think I like sharpening as much time and thought I give it But I really just want to have the best edge I can for my work The faster I can get back to work the better Okay I don t like the jig either But so far that given me the most consist grind But you can even use the jig on narrow knifes Sounds like I should maybe look into either an larger wet grinder or belt grinder Also on another topic from reading all your stuff on hook knives You don t have to spend much for an good sloyd knife But for a good hook knife your going have to spend alittle more My favorites right now are Hans Karlsson s wish I could try those by Bo Helgesson But what I m not clear on is which frost hook knife you recommend to students that don t have much money to spend but are willing to spend time sharpening and modifying them The single bevel or double bevel dulling one bevel of couse Reply Robin Wood December 22 2010 at 7 09 pm I recommend the 164 tight curve single edge It is not ideal but it works I like the Karlsson too Reply T L Cooper December 22 2010 at 7 18 pm Alright Thanks for all your help Reply Antiparaziten September 4 2011 at 7 06 pm Hei man Use russian knife from Vorsma little town on Obi river I m too many time use some knifes and norvegian too and can say there is nothing better than Russian steel Seek Saro Vorsma I m use now knife named as Lisa 2 Eng Fox 2 Be fun Reply Lewis Ward August 25 2012 at 8 21 pm Robin I think I understand your reasoning for favoring the longer Frosts knife I prefer the 2 1 4 Frost s carver and the 2 3 4 Frost s sloyd knife to remove wood For finer cravings I have many other smaller under 2 knives to choose from for a specific purposes The longer Frost s knife you prefer tends to not provide the power needed for larger cuts when using the end of the blade It s a simple matter of physics You have less leverage further out the blade particularly with a narrow light point I do use a 3 1 2 X 3 4 WWII Finnish Puuko and a Skookum Bush Tool 3 3 4 X 1 x 1 8 thick for processing wood My newest is a Roselli UHC with a very short blade I m always searching for the magical knife and the small Frost s carver is my favorite for much of my carving I my try the sloyd knives from Country Workshops Drew Langsner and Dell Stubbs Reply Robin Wood August 26 2012 at 9 35 pm Hi Lewis if a short blade works for you that is fine The reason I like the longer blade is that it allows more slicing action I use the whole of the 3 1 2 edge to cut through 1 of wood For power cuts I am working by the handle not at the tip Wille and Jogge Sunqvist are fans of the 106 too though many folk do get on well with the shorter 120 I don t get as uptight as some chasing the perfect knife so long as the basics are there then technique is far more important than the knife Many beginners feel if they had a better or more expensive knife then maybe everything would be easier I have a very large collection of hand made and factory made knives I have forged many myself and worked with good knifemakers to design good carving knives and the Frosts 106 works as well as any of them Reply Nathan April 2 2014 at 5 07 am What do you mean by I use the 3 1 2 inch blade to cut through one inch wood do you mean an inch deep into the wood or do you mean the blade is moving an inch also how deep can you cut into soft wood with a single stroke with the mora 106 Thanks Reply Robin Wood April 2 2014 at 7 23 am Nathan what I mean is the blade is slicing in the same way that it is possible to use the whole length of a 10 kitchen knife whilst cutting through a 2 tomato I am not sure I understand the second part of the question With the sort of carving that I do I would rarely push a knife straight into a piece of soft wood but if say I decided the handle of my spoon blank was too long and wanted to cut it off I can easily do that in one stroke even if it is 1 x 1 That is more about having good technique than the type of blade I am using though Reply Nathan April 12 2014 at 12 51 am What do you mean good technique I didn t know that pushing a blade through one inch of wood takes technique because aren t you just pushing it through Also why is the mora 106 better than a delstubbs does it remove more wood better steel Speaking of which how much can a del Stubbs knife remove wood Reply Robin Wood April 12 2014 at 7 02 am I would not say that a 106 is better than one of Del s Del s knives are great as I say in the article If you are looking for an excellent and cheap knife to start carving however you can not get better than a 106 What I mean by good technique is difficult to describe in a few words but I do teach a 3 day course in using a knife which just covers the basics Wille Sundqvist wrote a good book on the subject Suffice to say it is not as simple as aren t you just pushing it through when you learn good knife technique and how to get the best out of a range of different grips you can cut far more wood more quickly and accurately with less strain on your body You end up thinking less about cutting and more about the design you are creating adacosta September 5 2012 at 7 56 pm Great article I use the Mora Knives as well and love them I have also found a skilled craftsman located across the border from me here in Canada that makes his own knvies I absolutely love them It usually takes awhile last order was 2mos to receive my sloyd but well worth the wait Anyone else use Pinewood Forge knives http www pinewoodforge com Loved your article on spoonfest hope i can attend one day Reply Robin Wood September 5 2012 at 8 01 pm yep Pinewood forge is Dell Stubbs referred to in the article great knives He sadly had a bad accident since I wrote the article damaging his hand and has a backlog of orders but he is back in production now Reply chris October 15 2012 at 2 58 am hi came across ur video looking at carving info im a beginner and trying to choose a knife im trying to find somthing i can use for fire wood processing as well as carving whittling i have my eyes on the Mora Force or the Mora Forest 2010 are those good or bad choices the force is 2mm thick all the way thru the whole blade and is scandi and the forest is 2mm scandi the first half near the handle and thinner at the tip with i think a flat or convex grind any help appriciated thanks Reply Robin Wood October 15 2012 at 8 40 am Chris once you have finished your firewood processing your woodcarving knife will not be in the best shape and more than if you did firewood processing with a chefs knife then tried to cut tomatoes A good woodcarving knife will do a few feather sticks and so on but I think better to buy a 106 and a cheap general purpose knife the ones you mention are good general purpose knives but there are cheaper ones too eg http www clasohlson com uk Morakniv C2 AE Craftline Q 511 Knife Pr407804000 Reply chris October 16 2012 at 7 55 pm lets say the mora force was kept sharp is the blade on that model too thick and wide to be usefull as a primary general shaper in wood carving paired with a another knife knives more suited for wood crafting for the detail work it is 2 4mm thick and 23 5mm wide and scandi thank you Reply Maarten January 21 2013 at 8 32 am Thanks for the tips Best regards Maartenhttp blog mjvanderwielen com Reply Alistair Park October 3 2013 at 11 40 pm Hi Robin it s very interesting reading your experience with woodcarving knives Your choice of knife blade shape for carving is certainly very different to mine I ve been using a four inch bladed Opinel for nineteen years Even now that I m woodcarving all sorts of stuff for a job it s still my favourite bladed tool It s got a slightly bellied blade and a pretty steep secondary bevel but i wouldn t have it any other way The bellied blade means that slicing cuts can travel through the wood far more efficiently in the same way that a slightly rounded cutting edge on a carving gouge can do I know Chris Pye calls a slicing cut the carver s cut as it is so handy for cutting against grain etc As for the bevel it means that the blade will jig itself out of cuts very handy when cutting back towards the hand to create the far side of grooves and furrows and also carving fine detail I keep the very tip more of a single bevel but can t get along at all with a scandi grind as the blade jigs itself to just cut straight ahead not back to the surface of the work Bit hard to explain the techniques I use without a vid but there s picture of my detail knife carving technique on this web address http www carvings with stories co uk knife 20handles html It shows the carving knife being used to carve the handle of a new Opinel of the same size so you can compare the blade shapes All the woodcarving work on the page was solely done with that knife and a bit of sandpaper as was most of the carving on these wooden insects http www carvings with stories co uk insects html I hope that they show what kind of detail carving I m talking about It s true that a lot of people who write about knife carving seem to agree with your thoughts on blades but I just wanted to show the blade shape that works for my carving techniques and how different it is from that It works for me though However it has to be said that that double bevelled carving blade is absolutely useless for chopping onions Thanks for the very interesting blog and site Robin and all the best Alistair Reply Lisa March 6 2014 at 9 06 am Hello What wood should a beginner use to carve with I m just starting out and would like to know the best wood to use in the Uk Reply Garrett April 13 2014 at 11 40 am If you had to pick between a mora 106 and del Stubbs sloyd which would you choose and why Which one can remove more wood Reply Robin Wood April 13 2014 at 12 02 pm I regularly have that choice to make as I have several of Del s knives and lots of 106s around the house I pick up the nearest one they are both good Reply Garrett April 14 2014 at 10 30 am Which one can remove more wood Reply Robin Wood April 14 2014 at 4 54 pm Removing a lot of wood fast is about technique more than the knife either knife will remove wood fast and accurately in skilled hands and be slow and inaccurate in unskilled hands Reply Garrett April 19 2014 at 3 48 am Aren t the 106 and sloyd delstubbs knife identical except the blade style is different Also is the mora made out of 01 high carbon steel like the delstubbs Reply Robin Wood April 21 2014 at 10 34 pm They are different the 106 is laminated hard steel in the centre soft steel on the sides They are both hardened to around 61 rockwell They are very different in shape the 106 is longer and has less belly The 106 is far cheaper the Stubbs nicer finish the rounded back is kind to hands if you do thumb push cuts and the handles very nice You also have the pleasure of supporting a craftsman rather than buying a largely machine made knife Both are excellent knives Reply Borbon October 16 2014 at 12 15 am Does the finish affect performance Reply Robin Wood October 16 2014 at 5 16 pm Not sure what do you mean by the finish Reply Jonathan April 21 2014 at 12 21 pm Is the mora 106 made out of 01 high carbon steel like the dels stubs sloyd knife also what are the differences of the mora 106 and the delstubbs sloyd Reply Robin Wood April 21 2014 at 10 36 pm No the 106 is laminated not O1 I set out the differences in the answer to the previous question Hope that help they are both great knives you would not be disappointed if you bought either or both Reply Rene May 5 2014 at 10 24 am Thank you Robin for this short and pointed article I know the aspects from Wille s book And here you added some detailed facts experiences But you write Pocket folding knives called whittlers are OK for peeling the bark off a twig or pointing a skewer for the BBQ but not for serious woodcarving I think the term serious is not very clear in here Only one example I would call whittler Chris Lubkeman a serious woodcarver In fact he uses small folding pocket knives for his small sized figures It works Sure it is not the swedish or bushcraft tradition but his figures are well designed and at a highly skilled level And another whittler is a professional carver too Steve Tomashek He mainly uses knives that you would use for engraving And he produces beautiful carved animals Just another point of view Reply Mike July 18 2014 at 5 51

    Original URL path: http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2010/11/29/what-is-the-best-knife-for-wood-carving-and-whittling/comment-page-1/ (2016-05-01)
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  • what is the best knife for wood carving and whittling? Robin Wood
    convex edge to smooth the wide surface I liken it to a plane iron having an cambered edge Anyway thought I would throw that out there Your right though because for the most part I do about half to two third of a spoon with either my Del Stubbs regular sloyd and an a narrow Mora knife one that because narrowed by sharpening more narrow than the 120 Reply Robin Wood December 12 2010 at 9 37 am Thanks for the comments DIY Pocket knives can be used for carving but they all have a secondary bevel which means you do not get the effect of being able to control the cut by running the big primary bevel on the wood Refsal knives are great for what they are designed for flat plane carving in soft woods I love the work of Axel Peterson but most flat plane carving done today I find a bit twee Tim No I don t hollow grind I have a Tormek so I easily could I sharpen Japanese style a single flat bevel on waterstones I occasionally use a larger knife for roughing out and asked Del to make the large sloyd which is now part of his range In practice though I find I seem to end up using a 106 all the time There is no right answer it s a question of what works for you and for me as often as not it is just the closest knife I lay my hands on and I have lots of 106 s Reply T L Cooper December 22 2010 at 6 35 pm Okay well the reason I ask Is that have try on and off over the past 7 or so years hollowing grinding knifes The idea is to save time But so far most of the time it doesn t I often don t get a very good grind Which takes more time to remove And I often end up with a nearly flat grind anyways So I guess I m wondering is this same reason you do not hollow grind your knives Reply Robin Wood December 22 2010 at 6 43 pm I guess so when anyone sharpens they want a good edge for the work they do in as short a time as possible I am always experimenting with sharpening but currently I am liking using only waterstones I can hollow grind on the tormek but I don t so much like using jigs and the wheel is too small to grind well freehand I have recently bought an old wet waterstone grinder 2 foot in diameter which is easier to freehand grind on but won t leave much of a hollow on a small knife I think most professional knife makers now are using belts and if they want hollow they us a contact wheel This followed by a quick touch on the buffing wheel gives a good edge in very little time Reply T L Cooper December 22 2010 at 7 06 pm That s for sure I think some people think I like sharpening as much time and thought I give it But I really just want to have the best edge I can for my work The faster I can get back to work the better Okay I don t like the jig either But so far that given me the most consist grind But you can even use the jig on narrow knifes Sounds like I should maybe look into either an larger wet grinder or belt grinder Also on another topic from reading all your stuff on hook knives You don t have to spend much for an good sloyd knife But for a good hook knife your going have to spend alittle more My favorites right now are Hans Karlsson s wish I could try those by Bo Helgesson But what I m not clear on is which frost hook knife you recommend to students that don t have much money to spend but are willing to spend time sharpening and modifying them The single bevel or double bevel dulling one bevel of couse Reply Robin Wood December 22 2010 at 7 09 pm I recommend the 164 tight curve single edge It is not ideal but it works I like the Karlsson too Reply T L Cooper December 22 2010 at 7 18 pm Alright Thanks for all your help Reply Antiparaziten September 4 2011 at 7 06 pm Hei man Use russian knife from Vorsma little town on Obi river I m too many time use some knifes and norvegian too and can say there is nothing better than Russian steel Seek Saro Vorsma I m use now knife named as Lisa 2 Eng Fox 2 Be fun Reply Lewis Ward August 25 2012 at 8 21 pm Robin I think I understand your reasoning for favoring the longer Frosts knife I prefer the 2 1 4 Frost s carver and the 2 3 4 Frost s sloyd knife to remove wood For finer cravings I have many other smaller under 2 knives to choose from for a specific purposes The longer Frost s knife you prefer tends to not provide the power needed for larger cuts when using the end of the blade It s a simple matter of physics You have less leverage further out the blade particularly with a narrow light point I do use a 3 1 2 X 3 4 WWII Finnish Puuko and a Skookum Bush Tool 3 3 4 X 1 x 1 8 thick for processing wood My newest is a Roselli UHC with a very short blade I m always searching for the magical knife and the small Frost s carver is my favorite for much of my carving I my try the sloyd knives from Country Workshops Drew Langsner and Dell Stubbs Reply Robin Wood August 26 2012 at 9 35 pm Hi Lewis if a short blade works for you that is fine The reason I like the longer blade is that it allows more slicing action I use the whole of the 3 1 2 edge to cut through 1 of wood For power cuts I am working by the handle not at the tip Wille and Jogge Sunqvist are fans of the 106 too though many folk do get on well with the shorter 120 I don t get as uptight as some chasing the perfect knife so long as the basics are there then technique is far more important than the knife Many beginners feel if they had a better or more expensive knife then maybe everything would be easier I have a very large collection of hand made and factory made knives I have forged many myself and worked with good knifemakers to design good carving knives and the Frosts 106 works as well as any of them Reply Nathan April 2 2014 at 5 07 am What do you mean by I use the 3 1 2 inch blade to cut through one inch wood do you mean an inch deep into the wood or do you mean the blade is moving an inch also how deep can you cut into soft wood with a single stroke with the mora 106 Thanks Reply Robin Wood April 2 2014 at 7 23 am Nathan what I mean is the blade is slicing in the same way that it is possible to use the whole length of a 10 kitchen knife whilst cutting through a 2 tomato I am not sure I understand the second part of the question With the sort of carving that I do I would rarely push a knife straight into a piece of soft wood but if say I decided the handle of my spoon blank was too long and wanted to cut it off I can easily do that in one stroke even if it is 1 x 1 That is more about having good technique than the type of blade I am using though Reply Nathan April 12 2014 at 12 51 am What do you mean good technique I didn t know that pushing a blade through one inch of wood takes technique because aren t you just pushing it through Also why is the mora 106 better than a delstubbs does it remove more wood better steel Speaking of which how much can a del Stubbs knife remove wood Reply Robin Wood April 12 2014 at 7 02 am I would not say that a 106 is better than one of Del s Del s knives are great as I say in the article If you are looking for an excellent and cheap knife to start carving however you can not get better than a 106 What I mean by good technique is difficult to describe in a few words but I do teach a 3 day course in using a knife which just covers the basics Wille Sundqvist wrote a good book on the subject Suffice to say it is not as simple as aren t you just pushing it through when you learn good knife technique and how to get the best out of a range of different grips you can cut far more wood more quickly and accurately with less strain on your body You end up thinking less about cutting and more about the design you are creating adacosta September 5 2012 at 7 56 pm Great article I use the Mora Knives as well and love them I have also found a skilled craftsman located across the border from me here in Canada that makes his own knvies I absolutely love them It usually takes awhile last order was 2mos to receive my sloyd but well worth the wait Anyone else use Pinewood Forge knives http www pinewoodforge com Loved your article on spoonfest hope i can attend one day Reply Robin Wood September 5 2012 at 8 01 pm yep Pinewood forge is Dell Stubbs referred to in the article great knives He sadly had a bad accident since I wrote the article damaging his hand and has a backlog of orders but he is back in production now Reply chris October 15 2012 at 2 58 am hi came across ur video looking at carving info im a beginner and trying to choose a knife im trying to find somthing i can use for fire wood processing as well as carving whittling i have my eyes on the Mora Force or the Mora Forest 2010 are those good or bad choices the force is 2mm thick all the way thru the whole blade and is scandi and the forest is 2mm scandi the first half near the handle and thinner at the tip with i think a flat or convex grind any help appriciated thanks Reply Robin Wood October 15 2012 at 8 40 am Chris once you have finished your firewood processing your woodcarving knife will not be in the best shape and more than if you did firewood processing with a chefs knife then tried to cut tomatoes A good woodcarving knife will do a few feather sticks and so on but I think better to buy a 106 and a cheap general purpose knife the ones you mention are good general purpose knives but there are cheaper ones too eg http www clasohlson com uk Morakniv C2 AE Craftline Q 511 Knife Pr407804000 Reply chris October 16 2012 at 7 55 pm lets say the mora force was kept sharp is the blade on that model too thick and wide to be usefull as a primary general shaper in wood carving paired with a another knife knives more suited for wood crafting for the detail work it is 2 4mm thick and 23 5mm wide and scandi thank you Reply Maarten January 21 2013 at 8 32 am Thanks for the tips Best regards Maartenhttp blog mjvanderwielen com Reply Alistair Park October 3 2013 at 11 40 pm Hi Robin it s very interesting reading your experience with woodcarving knives Your choice of knife blade shape for carving is certainly very different to mine I ve been using a four inch bladed Opinel for nineteen years Even now that I m woodcarving all sorts of stuff for a job it s still my favourite bladed tool It s got a slightly bellied blade and a pretty steep secondary bevel but i wouldn t have it any other way The bellied blade means that slicing cuts can travel through the wood far more efficiently in the same way that a slightly rounded cutting edge on a carving gouge can do I know Chris Pye calls a slicing cut the carver s cut as it is so handy for cutting against grain etc As for the bevel it means that the blade will jig itself out of cuts very handy when cutting back towards the hand to create the far side of grooves and furrows and also carving fine detail I keep the very tip more of a single bevel but can t get along at all with a scandi grind as the blade jigs itself to just cut straight ahead not back to the surface of the work Bit hard to explain the techniques I use without a vid but there s picture of my detail knife carving technique on this web address http www carvings with stories co uk knife 20handles html It shows the carving knife being used to carve the handle of a new Opinel of the same size so you can compare the blade shapes All the woodcarving work on the page was solely done with that knife and a bit of sandpaper as was most of the carving on these wooden insects http www carvings with stories co uk insects html I hope that they show what kind of detail carving I m talking about It s true that a lot of people who write about knife carving seem to agree with your thoughts on blades but I just wanted to show the blade shape that works for my carving techniques and how different it is from that It works for me though However it has to be said that that double bevelled carving blade is absolutely useless for chopping onions Thanks for the very interesting blog and site Robin and all the best Alistair Reply Lisa March 6 2014 at 9 06 am Hello What wood should a beginner use to carve with I m just starting out and would like to know the best wood to use in the Uk Reply Garrett April 13 2014 at 11 40 am If you had to pick between a mora 106 and del Stubbs sloyd which would you choose and why Which one can remove more wood Reply Robin Wood April 13 2014 at 12 02 pm I regularly have that choice to make as I have several of Del s knives and lots of 106s around the house I pick up the nearest one they are both good Reply Garrett April 14 2014 at 10 30 am Which one can remove more wood Reply Robin Wood April 14 2014 at 4 54 pm Removing a lot of wood fast is about technique more than the knife either knife will remove wood fast and accurately in skilled hands and be slow and inaccurate in unskilled hands Reply Garrett April 19 2014 at 3 48 am Aren t the 106 and sloyd delstubbs knife identical except the blade style is different Also is the mora made out of 01 high carbon steel like the delstubbs Reply Robin Wood April 21 2014 at 10 34 pm They are different the 106 is laminated hard steel in the centre soft steel on the sides They are both hardened to around 61 rockwell They are very different in shape the 106 is longer and has less belly The 106 is far cheaper the Stubbs nicer finish the rounded back is kind to hands if you do thumb push cuts and the handles very nice You also have the pleasure of supporting a craftsman rather than buying a largely machine made knife Both are excellent knives Reply Borbon October 16 2014 at 12 15 am Does the finish affect performance Reply Robin Wood October 16 2014 at 5 16 pm Not sure what do you mean by the finish Reply Jonathan April 21 2014 at 12 21 pm Is the mora 106 made out of 01 high carbon steel like the dels stubs sloyd knife also what are the differences of the mora 106 and the delstubbs sloyd Reply Robin Wood April 21 2014 at 10 36 pm No the 106 is laminated not O1 I set out the differences in the answer to the previous question Hope that help they are both great knives you would not be disappointed if you bought either or both Reply Rene May 5 2014 at 10 24 am Thank you Robin for this short and pointed article I know the aspects from Wille s book And here you added some detailed facts experiences But you write Pocket folding knives called whittlers are OK for peeling the bark off a twig or pointing a skewer for the BBQ but not for serious woodcarving I think the term serious is not very clear in here Only one example I would call whittler Chris Lubkeman a serious woodcarver In fact he uses small folding pocket knives for his small sized figures It works Sure it is not the swedish or bushcraft tradition but his figures are well designed and at a highly skilled level And another whittler is a professional carver too Steve Tomashek He mainly uses knives that you would use for engraving And he produces beautiful carved animals Just another point of view Reply Mike July 18 2014 at 5 51 pm

    Original URL path: http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2010/11/29/what-is-the-best-knife-for-wood-carving-and-whittling/?replytocom=2892 (2016-05-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • what is the best knife for wood carving and whittling? Robin Wood
    edge to smooth the wide surface I liken it to a plane iron having an cambered edge Anyway thought I would throw that out there Your right though because for the most part I do about half to two third of a spoon with either my Del Stubbs regular sloyd and an a narrow Mora knife one that because narrowed by sharpening more narrow than the 120 Reply Robin Wood December 12 2010 at 9 37 am Thanks for the comments DIY Pocket knives can be used for carving but they all have a secondary bevel which means you do not get the effect of being able to control the cut by running the big primary bevel on the wood Refsal knives are great for what they are designed for flat plane carving in soft woods I love the work of Axel Peterson but most flat plane carving done today I find a bit twee Tim No I don t hollow grind I have a Tormek so I easily could I sharpen Japanese style a single flat bevel on waterstones I occasionally use a larger knife for roughing out and asked Del to make the large sloyd which is now part of his range In practice though I find I seem to end up using a 106 all the time There is no right answer it s a question of what works for you and for me as often as not it is just the closest knife I lay my hands on and I have lots of 106 s Reply T L Cooper December 22 2010 at 6 35 pm Okay well the reason I ask Is that have try on and off over the past 7 or so years hollowing grinding knifes The idea is to save time But so far most of the time it doesn t I often don t get a very good grind Which takes more time to remove And I often end up with a nearly flat grind anyways So I guess I m wondering is this same reason you do not hollow grind your knives Reply Robin Wood December 22 2010 at 6 43 pm I guess so when anyone sharpens they want a good edge for the work they do in as short a time as possible I am always experimenting with sharpening but currently I am liking using only waterstones I can hollow grind on the tormek but I don t so much like using jigs and the wheel is too small to grind well freehand I have recently bought an old wet waterstone grinder 2 foot in diameter which is easier to freehand grind on but won t leave much of a hollow on a small knife I think most professional knife makers now are using belts and if they want hollow they us a contact wheel This followed by a quick touch on the buffing wheel gives a good edge in very little time Reply T L Cooper December 22 2010 at 7 06 pm That s for sure I think some people think I like sharpening as much time and thought I give it But I really just want to have the best edge I can for my work The faster I can get back to work the better Okay I don t like the jig either But so far that given me the most consist grind But you can even use the jig on narrow knifes Sounds like I should maybe look into either an larger wet grinder or belt grinder Also on another topic from reading all your stuff on hook knives You don t have to spend much for an good sloyd knife But for a good hook knife your going have to spend alittle more My favorites right now are Hans Karlsson s wish I could try those by Bo Helgesson But what I m not clear on is which frost hook knife you recommend to students that don t have much money to spend but are willing to spend time sharpening and modifying them The single bevel or double bevel dulling one bevel of couse Reply Robin Wood December 22 2010 at 7 09 pm I recommend the 164 tight curve single edge It is not ideal but it works I like the Karlsson too Reply T L Cooper December 22 2010 at 7 18 pm Alright Thanks for all your help Reply Antiparaziten September 4 2011 at 7 06 pm Hei man Use russian knife from Vorsma little town on Obi river I m too many time use some knifes and norvegian too and can say there is nothing better than Russian steel Seek Saro Vorsma I m use now knife named as Lisa 2 Eng Fox 2 Be fun Reply Lewis Ward August 25 2012 at 8 21 pm Robin I think I understand your reasoning for favoring the longer Frosts knife I prefer the 2 1 4 Frost s carver and the 2 3 4 Frost s sloyd knife to remove wood For finer cravings I have many other smaller under 2 knives to choose from for a specific purposes The longer Frost s knife you prefer tends to not provide the power needed for larger cuts when using the end of the blade It s a simple matter of physics You have less leverage further out the blade particularly with a narrow light point I do use a 3 1 2 X 3 4 WWII Finnish Puuko and a Skookum Bush Tool 3 3 4 X 1 x 1 8 thick for processing wood My newest is a Roselli UHC with a very short blade I m always searching for the magical knife and the small Frost s carver is my favorite for much of my carving I my try the sloyd knives from Country Workshops Drew Langsner and Dell Stubbs Reply Robin Wood August 26 2012 at 9 35 pm Hi Lewis if a short blade works for you that is fine The reason I like the longer blade is that it allows more slicing action I use the whole of the 3 1 2 edge to cut through 1 of wood For power cuts I am working by the handle not at the tip Wille and Jogge Sunqvist are fans of the 106 too though many folk do get on well with the shorter 120 I don t get as uptight as some chasing the perfect knife so long as the basics are there then technique is far more important than the knife Many beginners feel if they had a better or more expensive knife then maybe everything would be easier I have a very large collection of hand made and factory made knives I have forged many myself and worked with good knifemakers to design good carving knives and the Frosts 106 works as well as any of them Reply Nathan April 2 2014 at 5 07 am What do you mean by I use the 3 1 2 inch blade to cut through one inch wood do you mean an inch deep into the wood or do you mean the blade is moving an inch also how deep can you cut into soft wood with a single stroke with the mora 106 Thanks Reply Robin Wood April 2 2014 at 7 23 am Nathan what I mean is the blade is slicing in the same way that it is possible to use the whole length of a 10 kitchen knife whilst cutting through a 2 tomato I am not sure I understand the second part of the question With the sort of carving that I do I would rarely push a knife straight into a piece of soft wood but if say I decided the handle of my spoon blank was too long and wanted to cut it off I can easily do that in one stroke even if it is 1 x 1 That is more about having good technique than the type of blade I am using though Reply Nathan April 12 2014 at 12 51 am What do you mean good technique I didn t know that pushing a blade through one inch of wood takes technique because aren t you just pushing it through Also why is the mora 106 better than a delstubbs does it remove more wood better steel Speaking of which how much can a del Stubbs knife remove wood Reply Robin Wood April 12 2014 at 7 02 am I would not say that a 106 is better than one of Del s Del s knives are great as I say in the article If you are looking for an excellent and cheap knife to start carving however you can not get better than a 106 What I mean by good technique is difficult to describe in a few words but I do teach a 3 day course in using a knife which just covers the basics Wille Sundqvist wrote a good book on the subject Suffice to say it is not as simple as aren t you just pushing it through when you learn good knife technique and how to get the best out of a range of different grips you can cut far more wood more quickly and accurately with less strain on your body You end up thinking less about cutting and more about the design you are creating adacosta September 5 2012 at 7 56 pm Great article I use the Mora Knives as well and love them I have also found a skilled craftsman located across the border from me here in Canada that makes his own knvies I absolutely love them It usually takes awhile last order was 2mos to receive my sloyd but well worth the wait Anyone else use Pinewood Forge knives http www pinewoodforge com Loved your article on spoonfest hope i can attend one day Reply Robin Wood September 5 2012 at 8 01 pm yep Pinewood forge is Dell Stubbs referred to in the article great knives He sadly had a bad accident since I wrote the article damaging his hand and has a backlog of orders but he is back in production now Reply chris October 15 2012 at 2 58 am hi came across ur video looking at carving info im a beginner and trying to choose a knife im trying to find somthing i can use for fire wood processing as well as carving whittling i have my eyes on the Mora Force or the Mora Forest 2010 are those good or bad choices the force is 2mm thick all the way thru the whole blade and is scandi and the forest is 2mm scandi the first half near the handle and thinner at the tip with i think a flat or convex grind any help appriciated thanks Reply Robin Wood October 15 2012 at 8 40 am Chris once you have finished your firewood processing your woodcarving knife will not be in the best shape and more than if you did firewood processing with a chefs knife then tried to cut tomatoes A good woodcarving knife will do a few feather sticks and so on but I think better to buy a 106 and a cheap general purpose knife the ones you mention are good general purpose knives but there are cheaper ones too eg http www clasohlson com uk Morakniv C2 AE Craftline Q 511 Knife Pr407804000 Reply chris October 16 2012 at 7 55 pm lets say the mora force was kept sharp is the blade on that model too thick and wide to be usefull as a primary general shaper in wood carving paired with a another knife knives more suited for wood crafting for the detail work it is 2 4mm thick and 23 5mm wide and scandi thank you Reply Maarten January 21 2013 at 8 32 am Thanks for the tips Best regards Maartenhttp blog mjvanderwielen com Reply Alistair Park October 3 2013 at 11 40 pm Hi Robin it s very interesting reading your experience with woodcarving knives Your choice of knife blade shape for carving is certainly very different to mine I ve been using a four inch bladed Opinel for nineteen years Even now that I m woodcarving all sorts of stuff for a job it s still my favourite bladed tool It s got a slightly bellied blade and a pretty steep secondary bevel but i wouldn t have it any other way The bellied blade means that slicing cuts can travel through the wood far more efficiently in the same way that a slightly rounded cutting edge on a carving gouge can do I know Chris Pye calls a slicing cut the carver s cut as it is so handy for cutting against grain etc As for the bevel it means that the blade will jig itself out of cuts very handy when cutting back towards the hand to create the far side of grooves and furrows and also carving fine detail I keep the very tip more of a single bevel but can t get along at all with a scandi grind as the blade jigs itself to just cut straight ahead not back to the surface of the work Bit hard to explain the techniques I use without a vid but there s picture of my detail knife carving technique on this web address http www carvings with stories co uk knife 20handles html It shows the carving knife being used to carve the handle of a new Opinel of the same size so you can compare the blade shapes All the woodcarving work on the page was solely done with that knife and a bit of sandpaper as was most of the carving on these wooden insects http www carvings with stories co uk insects html I hope that they show what kind of detail carving I m talking about It s true that a lot of people who write about knife carving seem to agree with your thoughts on blades but I just wanted to show the blade shape that works for my carving techniques and how different it is from that It works for me though However it has to be said that that double bevelled carving blade is absolutely useless for chopping onions Thanks for the very interesting blog and site Robin and all the best Alistair Reply Lisa March 6 2014 at 9 06 am Hello What wood should a beginner use to carve with I m just starting out and would like to know the best wood to use in the Uk Reply Garrett April 13 2014 at 11 40 am If you had to pick between a mora 106 and del Stubbs sloyd which would you choose and why Which one can remove more wood Reply Robin Wood April 13 2014 at 12 02 pm I regularly have that choice to make as I have several of Del s knives and lots of 106s around the house I pick up the nearest one they are both good Reply Garrett April 14 2014 at 10 30 am Which one can remove more wood Reply Robin Wood April 14 2014 at 4 54 pm Removing a lot of wood fast is about technique more than the knife either knife will remove wood fast and accurately in skilled hands and be slow and inaccurate in unskilled hands Reply Garrett April 19 2014 at 3 48 am Aren t the 106 and sloyd delstubbs knife identical except the blade style is different Also is the mora made out of 01 high carbon steel like the delstubbs Reply Robin Wood April 21 2014 at 10 34 pm They are different the 106 is laminated hard steel in the centre soft steel on the sides They are both hardened to around 61 rockwell They are very different in shape the 106 is longer and has less belly The 106 is far cheaper the Stubbs nicer finish the rounded back is kind to hands if you do thumb push cuts and the handles very nice You also have the pleasure of supporting a craftsman rather than buying a largely machine made knife Both are excellent knives Reply Borbon October 16 2014 at 12 15 am Does the finish affect performance Reply Robin Wood October 16 2014 at 5 16 pm Not sure what do you mean by the finish Reply Jonathan April 21 2014 at 12 21 pm Is the mora 106 made out of 01 high carbon steel like the dels stubs sloyd knife also what are the differences of the mora 106 and the delstubbs sloyd Reply Robin Wood April 21 2014 at 10 36 pm No the 106 is laminated not O1 I set out the differences in the answer to the previous question Hope that help they are both great knives you would not be disappointed if you bought either or both Reply Rene May 5 2014 at 10 24 am Thank you Robin for this short and pointed article I know the aspects from Wille s book And here you added some detailed facts experiences But you write Pocket folding knives called whittlers are OK for peeling the bark off a twig or pointing a skewer for the BBQ but not for serious woodcarving I think the term serious is not very clear in here Only one example I would call whittler Chris Lubkeman a serious woodcarver In fact he uses small folding pocket knives for his small sized figures It works Sure it is not the swedish or bushcraft tradition but his figures are well designed and at a highly skilled level And another whittler is a professional carver too Steve Tomashek He mainly uses knives that you would use for engraving And he produces beautiful carved animals Just another point of view Reply Mike July 18 2014 at 5 51 pm With

    Original URL path: http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2010/11/29/what-is-the-best-knife-for-wood-carving-and-whittling/?replytocom=2893 (2016-05-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • what is the best knife for wood carving and whittling? Robin Wood
    edge to smooth the wide surface I liken it to a plane iron having an cambered edge Anyway thought I would throw that out there Your right though because for the most part I do about half to two third of a spoon with either my Del Stubbs regular sloyd and an a narrow Mora knife one that because narrowed by sharpening more narrow than the 120 Reply Robin Wood December 12 2010 at 9 37 am Thanks for the comments DIY Pocket knives can be used for carving but they all have a secondary bevel which means you do not get the effect of being able to control the cut by running the big primary bevel on the wood Refsal knives are great for what they are designed for flat plane carving in soft woods I love the work of Axel Peterson but most flat plane carving done today I find a bit twee Tim No I don t hollow grind I have a Tormek so I easily could I sharpen Japanese style a single flat bevel on waterstones I occasionally use a larger knife for roughing out and asked Del to make the large sloyd which is now part of his range In practice though I find I seem to end up using a 106 all the time There is no right answer it s a question of what works for you and for me as often as not it is just the closest knife I lay my hands on and I have lots of 106 s Reply T L Cooper December 22 2010 at 6 35 pm Okay well the reason I ask Is that have try on and off over the past 7 or so years hollowing grinding knifes The idea is to save time But so far most of the time it doesn t I often don t get a very good grind Which takes more time to remove And I often end up with a nearly flat grind anyways So I guess I m wondering is this same reason you do not hollow grind your knives Reply Robin Wood December 22 2010 at 6 43 pm I guess so when anyone sharpens they want a good edge for the work they do in as short a time as possible I am always experimenting with sharpening but currently I am liking using only waterstones I can hollow grind on the tormek but I don t so much like using jigs and the wheel is too small to grind well freehand I have recently bought an old wet waterstone grinder 2 foot in diameter which is easier to freehand grind on but won t leave much of a hollow on a small knife I think most professional knife makers now are using belts and if they want hollow they us a contact wheel This followed by a quick touch on the buffing wheel gives a good edge in very little time Reply T L Cooper December 22 2010 at 7 06 pm That s for sure I think some people think I like sharpening as much time and thought I give it But I really just want to have the best edge I can for my work The faster I can get back to work the better Okay I don t like the jig either But so far that given me the most consist grind But you can even use the jig on narrow knifes Sounds like I should maybe look into either an larger wet grinder or belt grinder Also on another topic from reading all your stuff on hook knives You don t have to spend much for an good sloyd knife But for a good hook knife your going have to spend alittle more My favorites right now are Hans Karlsson s wish I could try those by Bo Helgesson But what I m not clear on is which frost hook knife you recommend to students that don t have much money to spend but are willing to spend time sharpening and modifying them The single bevel or double bevel dulling one bevel of couse Reply Robin Wood December 22 2010 at 7 09 pm I recommend the 164 tight curve single edge It is not ideal but it works I like the Karlsson too Reply T L Cooper December 22 2010 at 7 18 pm Alright Thanks for all your help Reply Antiparaziten September 4 2011 at 7 06 pm Hei man Use russian knife from Vorsma little town on Obi river I m too many time use some knifes and norvegian too and can say there is nothing better than Russian steel Seek Saro Vorsma I m use now knife named as Lisa 2 Eng Fox 2 Be fun Reply Lewis Ward August 25 2012 at 8 21 pm Robin I think I understand your reasoning for favoring the longer Frosts knife I prefer the 2 1 4 Frost s carver and the 2 3 4 Frost s sloyd knife to remove wood For finer cravings I have many other smaller under 2 knives to choose from for a specific purposes The longer Frost s knife you prefer tends to not provide the power needed for larger cuts when using the end of the blade It s a simple matter of physics You have less leverage further out the blade particularly with a narrow light point I do use a 3 1 2 X 3 4 WWII Finnish Puuko and a Skookum Bush Tool 3 3 4 X 1 x 1 8 thick for processing wood My newest is a Roselli UHC with a very short blade I m always searching for the magical knife and the small Frost s carver is my favorite for much of my carving I my try the sloyd knives from Country Workshops Drew Langsner and Dell Stubbs Reply Robin Wood August 26 2012 at 9 35 pm Hi Lewis if a short blade works for you that is fine The reason I like the longer blade is that it allows more slicing action I use the whole of the 3 1 2 edge to cut through 1 of wood For power cuts I am working by the handle not at the tip Wille and Jogge Sunqvist are fans of the 106 too though many folk do get on well with the shorter 120 I don t get as uptight as some chasing the perfect knife so long as the basics are there then technique is far more important than the knife Many beginners feel if they had a better or more expensive knife then maybe everything would be easier I have a very large collection of hand made and factory made knives I have forged many myself and worked with good knifemakers to design good carving knives and the Frosts 106 works as well as any of them Reply Nathan April 2 2014 at 5 07 am What do you mean by I use the 3 1 2 inch blade to cut through one inch wood do you mean an inch deep into the wood or do you mean the blade is moving an inch also how deep can you cut into soft wood with a single stroke with the mora 106 Thanks Reply Robin Wood April 2 2014 at 7 23 am Nathan what I mean is the blade is slicing in the same way that it is possible to use the whole length of a 10 kitchen knife whilst cutting through a 2 tomato I am not sure I understand the second part of the question With the sort of carving that I do I would rarely push a knife straight into a piece of soft wood but if say I decided the handle of my spoon blank was too long and wanted to cut it off I can easily do that in one stroke even if it is 1 x 1 That is more about having good technique than the type of blade I am using though Reply Nathan April 12 2014 at 12 51 am What do you mean good technique I didn t know that pushing a blade through one inch of wood takes technique because aren t you just pushing it through Also why is the mora 106 better than a delstubbs does it remove more wood better steel Speaking of which how much can a del Stubbs knife remove wood Reply Robin Wood April 12 2014 at 7 02 am I would not say that a 106 is better than one of Del s Del s knives are great as I say in the article If you are looking for an excellent and cheap knife to start carving however you can not get better than a 106 What I mean by good technique is difficult to describe in a few words but I do teach a 3 day course in using a knife which just covers the basics Wille Sundqvist wrote a good book on the subject Suffice to say it is not as simple as aren t you just pushing it through when you learn good knife technique and how to get the best out of a range of different grips you can cut far more wood more quickly and accurately with less strain on your body You end up thinking less about cutting and more about the design you are creating adacosta September 5 2012 at 7 56 pm Great article I use the Mora Knives as well and love them I have also found a skilled craftsman located across the border from me here in Canada that makes his own knvies I absolutely love them It usually takes awhile last order was 2mos to receive my sloyd but well worth the wait Anyone else use Pinewood Forge knives http www pinewoodforge com Loved your article on spoonfest hope i can attend one day Reply Robin Wood September 5 2012 at 8 01 pm yep Pinewood forge is Dell Stubbs referred to in the article great knives He sadly had a bad accident since I wrote the article damaging his hand and has a backlog of orders but he is back in production now Reply chris October 15 2012 at 2 58 am hi came across ur video looking at carving info im a beginner and trying to choose a knife im trying to find somthing i can use for fire wood processing as well as carving whittling i have my eyes on the Mora Force or the Mora Forest 2010 are those good or bad choices the force is 2mm thick all the way thru the whole blade and is scandi and the forest is 2mm scandi the first half near the handle and thinner at the tip with i think a flat or convex grind any help appriciated thanks Reply Robin Wood October 15 2012 at 8 40 am Chris once you have finished your firewood processing your woodcarving knife will not be in the best shape and more than if you did firewood processing with a chefs knife then tried to cut tomatoes A good woodcarving knife will do a few feather sticks and so on but I think better to buy a 106 and a cheap general purpose knife the ones you mention are good general purpose knives but there are cheaper ones too eg http www clasohlson com uk Morakniv C2 AE Craftline Q 511 Knife Pr407804000 Reply chris October 16 2012 at 7 55 pm lets say the mora force was kept sharp is the blade on that model too thick and wide to be usefull as a primary general shaper in wood carving paired with a another knife knives more suited for wood crafting for the detail work it is 2 4mm thick and 23 5mm wide and scandi thank you Reply Maarten January 21 2013 at 8 32 am Thanks for the tips Best regards Maartenhttp blog mjvanderwielen com Reply Alistair Park October 3 2013 at 11 40 pm Hi Robin it s very interesting reading your experience with woodcarving knives Your choice of knife blade shape for carving is certainly very different to mine I ve been using a four inch bladed Opinel for nineteen years Even now that I m woodcarving all sorts of stuff for a job it s still my favourite bladed tool It s got a slightly bellied blade and a pretty steep secondary bevel but i wouldn t have it any other way The bellied blade means that slicing cuts can travel through the wood far more efficiently in the same way that a slightly rounded cutting edge on a carving gouge can do I know Chris Pye calls a slicing cut the carver s cut as it is so handy for cutting against grain etc As for the bevel it means that the blade will jig itself out of cuts very handy when cutting back towards the hand to create the far side of grooves and furrows and also carving fine detail I keep the very tip more of a single bevel but can t get along at all with a scandi grind as the blade jigs itself to just cut straight ahead not back to the surface of the work Bit hard to explain the techniques I use without a vid but there s picture of my detail knife carving technique on this web address http www carvings with stories co uk knife 20handles html It shows the carving knife being used to carve the handle of a new Opinel of the same size so you can compare the blade shapes All the woodcarving work on the page was solely done with that knife and a bit of sandpaper as was most of the carving on these wooden insects http www carvings with stories co uk insects html I hope that they show what kind of detail carving I m talking about It s true that a lot of people who write about knife carving seem to agree with your thoughts on blades but I just wanted to show the blade shape that works for my carving techniques and how different it is from that It works for me though However it has to be said that that double bevelled carving blade is absolutely useless for chopping onions Thanks for the very interesting blog and site Robin and all the best Alistair Reply Lisa March 6 2014 at 9 06 am Hello What wood should a beginner use to carve with I m just starting out and would like to know the best wood to use in the Uk Reply Garrett April 13 2014 at 11 40 am If you had to pick between a mora 106 and del Stubbs sloyd which would you choose and why Which one can remove more wood Reply Robin Wood April 13 2014 at 12 02 pm I regularly have that choice to make as I have several of Del s knives and lots of 106s around the house I pick up the nearest one they are both good Reply Garrett April 14 2014 at 10 30 am Which one can remove more wood Reply Robin Wood April 14 2014 at 4 54 pm Removing a lot of wood fast is about technique more than the knife either knife will remove wood fast and accurately in skilled hands and be slow and inaccurate in unskilled hands Reply Garrett April 19 2014 at 3 48 am Aren t the 106 and sloyd delstubbs knife identical except the blade style is different Also is the mora made out of 01 high carbon steel like the delstubbs Reply Robin Wood April 21 2014 at 10 34 pm They are different the 106 is laminated hard steel in the centre soft steel on the sides They are both hardened to around 61 rockwell They are very different in shape the 106 is longer and has less belly The 106 is far cheaper the Stubbs nicer finish the rounded back is kind to hands if you do thumb push cuts and the handles very nice You also have the pleasure of supporting a craftsman rather than buying a largely machine made knife Both are excellent knives Reply Borbon October 16 2014 at 12 15 am Does the finish affect performance Reply Robin Wood October 16 2014 at 5 16 pm Not sure what do you mean by the finish Reply Jonathan April 21 2014 at 12 21 pm Is the mora 106 made out of 01 high carbon steel like the dels stubs sloyd knife also what are the differences of the mora 106 and the delstubbs sloyd Reply Robin Wood April 21 2014 at 10 36 pm No the 106 is laminated not O1 I set out the differences in the answer to the previous question Hope that help they are both great knives you would not be disappointed if you bought either or both Reply Rene May 5 2014 at 10 24 am Thank you Robin for this short and pointed article I know the aspects from Wille s book And here you added some detailed facts experiences But you write Pocket folding knives called whittlers are OK for peeling the bark off a twig or pointing a skewer for the BBQ but not for serious woodcarving I think the term serious is not very clear in here Only one example I would call whittler Chris Lubkeman a serious woodcarver In fact he uses small folding pocket knives for his small sized figures It works Sure it is not the swedish or bushcraft tradition but his figures are well designed and at a highly skilled level And another whittler is a professional carver too Steve Tomashek He mainly uses knives that you would use for engraving And he produces beautiful carved animals Just another point of view Reply Mike July 18 2014 at 5 51 pm With

    Original URL path: http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2010/11/29/what-is-the-best-knife-for-wood-carving-and-whittling/?replytocom=2894 (2016-05-01)
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