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  • new blog layout - Robin Wood
    great ways of connecting with like minded folk and sharing but if you run a business it is good for your readers to jump easily to whatever it is you make I run at between 250 and 500 blog visits a day at the moment I enjoy it when folk make comments in the comment box at the bottom or drop me emails Most of our carving courses are fully booked and the bowls seem to sell as soon as I put them in the gallery but I think it is important to make it easy for folk to see what you do If you don t show your work and tell folk how much it costs it takes a pretty dedicated customer to buy from you You may also like to read welcome to my new blog and website new blog new website coming soon How to price craft work business advice for craftspeople Prince s Craft Pavilion Ideal Home Show London how to carve wooden bowls Gransfors Bruks axes No comments yet Leave a Reply Click here to cancel reply Name required Email will not be published required Comment Search Blog Posts News and social media My newsletter has updates on new products courses and events Sign up here Latest blog posts Creative goodness The story of a spoon Spooncarving knife making in Sheffield Do what you love The Man Who Made Things From Trees me on Radio 4 Featured blog posts How to price craft work business advice for craftspeople Which is the best spoon carving knife hook knife any fool can make something more complex but it takes real genius to make things simple again building the world s most iconic viking ship part 1 Welsh love spoons and cawl spoons how to make a new
    http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2010/05/04/new-blog-layout/ (2016-05-01)


  • carve wooden bowls
    of the wood being held secure Reply Robin Wood May 3 2010 at 7 52 pm It s a funny thing I like the idea of working with the bare minimum of tools and holding devices When researching bowlcarving techniques one of the styles that attracted me most is native North West Coast American carving There is a sense of freedom that comes from carving without any bench or holding devices at all This simple bench is a compromise it is very quick and easy to build and having the bowl held really solid gives confidence and allows two hands on the tools which can speed carving Reply Will Simpson May 3 2010 at 8 44 pm Great and timely post I just came into a 10 dia red oak Between the knots may yield a bowl or four Michail s sloping chopping block looks intriguing It would be nice to use gravity to hold the piece If the bowl blank was nestled in the block well enough would we even need to wedge it Being able to rotate it 180 or even 90 degrees quickly would speed up the hollowing process Sounds like your only complaint was having to re wedge so much You might be interested to know that David Fisher wrote an article for Woodwork Magazine back in Dec 08 on a different version of his bowl carving horse with plans http www woodwork magazine com index php archives 131 Reply matthew May 4 2010 at 10 15 pm I really like this Robin I think I will make myself one I wonder how it works for finishing Are you using gouges or mostly knives Also what kind of push knife do you use Reply forestoffood May 6 2010 at 6 53 am Hi Robin That looks very useful I think it is going to be my next project I ve been trying carving bowls but lack of skill an a good clamping device prevented acceptable results Skill will come in time meanwhile I ll just have very elaborate firewood Reply Robin Wood May 31 2010 at 11 53 am Mathew sometimes I use a gouge between adze and knife but if students get to grips with skilled adze work then it is possible to get a pretty good finish with the adze and move straight on to the finishing knife I use Frosts Mora push knife Reply anthony March 13 2011 at 6 22 pm I made a bench as per Robin s design but it seems to me that you are commited to placing the workpiece flat side down I find it easier to put the piece in the vice flat side up then you can carve using the natural curvature of the wood My vice is an old Parkinsons Perfect Vise sic which opens to 25cm I suppose with that spelling it is of American origin Reply Robin Wood March 13 2011 at 6 57 pm Anthony Thanks for the input I clamp bowls
    http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2010/05/03/how-to-carve-wooden-bowls/comment-page-1/ (2016-05-01)

  • carve wooden bowls
    wood being held secure Reply Robin Wood May 3 2010 at 7 52 pm It s a funny thing I like the idea of working with the bare minimum of tools and holding devices When researching bowlcarving techniques one of the styles that attracted me most is native North West Coast American carving There is a sense of freedom that comes from carving without any bench or holding devices at all This simple bench is a compromise it is very quick and easy to build and having the bowl held really solid gives confidence and allows two hands on the tools which can speed carving Reply Will Simpson May 3 2010 at 8 44 pm Great and timely post I just came into a 10 dia red oak Between the knots may yield a bowl or four Michail s sloping chopping block looks intriguing It would be nice to use gravity to hold the piece If the bowl blank was nestled in the block well enough would we even need to wedge it Being able to rotate it 180 or even 90 degrees quickly would speed up the hollowing process Sounds like your only complaint was having to re wedge so much You might be interested to know that David Fisher wrote an article for Woodwork Magazine back in Dec 08 on a different version of his bowl carving horse with plans http www woodwork magazine com index php archives 131 Reply matthew May 4 2010 at 10 15 pm I really like this Robin I think I will make myself one I wonder how it works for finishing Are you using gouges or mostly knives Also what kind of push knife do you use Reply forestoffood May 6 2010 at 6 53 am Hi Robin That looks very useful I think it is going to be my next project I ve been trying carving bowls but lack of skill an a good clamping device prevented acceptable results Skill will come in time meanwhile I ll just have very elaborate firewood Reply Robin Wood May 31 2010 at 11 53 am Mathew sometimes I use a gouge between adze and knife but if students get to grips with skilled adze work then it is possible to get a pretty good finish with the adze and move straight on to the finishing knife I use Frosts Mora push knife Reply anthony March 13 2011 at 6 22 pm I made a bench as per Robin s design but it seems to me that you are commited to placing the workpiece flat side down I find it easier to put the piece in the vice flat side up then you can carve using the natural curvature of the wood My vice is an old Parkinsons Perfect Vise sic which opens to 25cm I suppose with that spelling it is of American origin Reply Robin Wood March 13 2011 at 6 57 pm Anthony Thanks for the input I clamp bowls either way
    http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2010/05/03/how-to-carve-wooden-bowls/?replytocom=2652 (2016-05-01)


  • carve wooden bowls
    wood being held secure Reply Robin Wood May 3 2010 at 7 52 pm It s a funny thing I like the idea of working with the bare minimum of tools and holding devices When researching bowlcarving techniques one of the styles that attracted me most is native North West Coast American carving There is a sense of freedom that comes from carving without any bench or holding devices at all This simple bench is a compromise it is very quick and easy to build and having the bowl held really solid gives confidence and allows two hands on the tools which can speed carving Reply Will Simpson May 3 2010 at 8 44 pm Great and timely post I just came into a 10 dia red oak Between the knots may yield a bowl or four Michail s sloping chopping block looks intriguing It would be nice to use gravity to hold the piece If the bowl blank was nestled in the block well enough would we even need to wedge it Being able to rotate it 180 or even 90 degrees quickly would speed up the hollowing process Sounds like your only complaint was having to re wedge so much You might be interested to know that David Fisher wrote an article for Woodwork Magazine back in Dec 08 on a different version of his bowl carving horse with plans http www woodwork magazine com index php archives 131 Reply matthew May 4 2010 at 10 15 pm I really like this Robin I think I will make myself one I wonder how it works for finishing Are you using gouges or mostly knives Also what kind of push knife do you use Reply forestoffood May 6 2010 at 6 53 am Hi Robin That looks very useful I think it is going to be my next project I ve been trying carving bowls but lack of skill an a good clamping device prevented acceptable results Skill will come in time meanwhile I ll just have very elaborate firewood Reply Robin Wood May 31 2010 at 11 53 am Mathew sometimes I use a gouge between adze and knife but if students get to grips with skilled adze work then it is possible to get a pretty good finish with the adze and move straight on to the finishing knife I use Frosts Mora push knife Reply anthony March 13 2011 at 6 22 pm I made a bench as per Robin s design but it seems to me that you are commited to placing the workpiece flat side down I find it easier to put the piece in the vice flat side up then you can carve using the natural curvature of the wood My vice is an old Parkinsons Perfect Vise sic which opens to 25cm I suppose with that spelling it is of American origin Reply Robin Wood March 13 2011 at 6 57 pm Anthony Thanks for the input I clamp bowls either way
    http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2010/05/03/how-to-carve-wooden-bowls/?replytocom=2653 (2016-05-01)

  • carve wooden bowls
    the wood being held secure Reply Robin Wood May 3 2010 at 7 52 pm It s a funny thing I like the idea of working with the bare minimum of tools and holding devices When researching bowlcarving techniques one of the styles that attracted me most is native North West Coast American carving There is a sense of freedom that comes from carving without any bench or holding devices at all This simple bench is a compromise it is very quick and easy to build and having the bowl held really solid gives confidence and allows two hands on the tools which can speed carving Reply Will Simpson May 3 2010 at 8 44 pm Great and timely post I just came into a 10 dia red oak Between the knots may yield a bowl or four Michail s sloping chopping block looks intriguing It would be nice to use gravity to hold the piece If the bowl blank was nestled in the block well enough would we even need to wedge it Being able to rotate it 180 or even 90 degrees quickly would speed up the hollowing process Sounds like your only complaint was having to re wedge so much You might be interested to know that David Fisher wrote an article for Woodwork Magazine back in Dec 08 on a different version of his bowl carving horse with plans http www woodwork magazine com index php archives 131 Reply matthew May 4 2010 at 10 15 pm I really like this Robin I think I will make myself one I wonder how it works for finishing Are you using gouges or mostly knives Also what kind of push knife do you use Reply forestoffood May 6 2010 at 6 53 am Hi Robin That looks very useful I think it is going to be my next project I ve been trying carving bowls but lack of skill an a good clamping device prevented acceptable results Skill will come in time meanwhile I ll just have very elaborate firewood Reply Robin Wood May 31 2010 at 11 53 am Mathew sometimes I use a gouge between adze and knife but if students get to grips with skilled adze work then it is possible to get a pretty good finish with the adze and move straight on to the finishing knife I use Frosts Mora push knife Reply anthony March 13 2011 at 6 22 pm I made a bench as per Robin s design but it seems to me that you are commited to placing the workpiece flat side down I find it easier to put the piece in the vice flat side up then you can carve using the natural curvature of the wood My vice is an old Parkinsons Perfect Vise sic which opens to 25cm I suppose with that spelling it is of American origin Reply Robin Wood March 13 2011 at 6 57 pm Anthony Thanks for the input I clamp bowls either
    http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2010/05/03/how-to-carve-wooden-bowls/?replytocom=2656 (2016-05-01)

  • finishing wood Archives - Robin Wood
    the most frequent Dry wood is like blotting paper and would soak up whatever you put on or in it A breakfast bowl would Continue Reading 112 how to make home made paint By Robin Wood on December 31 2008 in finishing wood I started playing with eco paints many years ago and tried various limewashes milk paints etc The recipe which I use now we learned whilst I was teaching at the National Hancrafts school in Sweden it is quick and very easy to make cheap quick drying smells nice and when fully cured washable It is Continue Reading 19 oiling bowls By Robin Wood on March 3 2008 in bowls and bowlturning finishing wood Well the porringers I was making 6 weeks ago when I started this blog are now dry and ready for oiling I am often asked what are the best oils to treat wood for food use and have experimented with many over the years Dry wood is like blotting paper and would absorb any liquid Continue Reading 6 Tool marks and drying wood By Robin Wood on January 26 2008 in bowls and bowlturning finishing wood Its been another week of porringer making I find it most efficient to make just one style of bowl for a couple of weeks then I ll switch to something else After a while the body just does the job swiftly and efficiently with little need for conscious thought At this stage I am free to Continue Reading 5 Search Blog Posts Featured blog posts How to price craft work business advice for craftspeople Which is the best spoon carving knife hook knife any fool can make something more complex but it takes real genius to make things simple again building the world s most iconic viking ship
    http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/category/finishing-wood/ (2016-05-01)

  • why I don't use sandpaper - Robin Wood
    Responses to why I don t use sandpaper Ingo Dyrkton April 22 2014 at 7 06 pm I agree and if your sanding in a confined area or a lot you will be inhaling dust that can be toxic and can give you a sore throat without using a mask Reply Bill April 23 2014 at 12 27 am What about using a scrapper I often use a scrapper for projects like spoons and never have the raised grain problem When I do make spoons I use saws chisels spokeshaves and scrappers I know that s not how you make yours but I don t make spoons or spatulas very often so I use what I have Reply Jason April 23 2014 at 1 51 am Robin Great post I agree 100 I used to agonize over sanding washing drying sanding washing drying you know the drill Now I just strop my edges be them chisels irons knifes or scrapers and take a nice clean finishing cut leaving a unique surface that can t be replicated by anything else My wife also appreciates that I don t have saw dust imbedded in ALL of my clothes when I get home P And to support your idea my skills have improved immensely when I finally tossed the sandpaper and had to stand behind my surfaces off the tools Reply Richard Andrew Law April 23 2014 at 6 52 am Bog oak wedges Reply Robin Wood April 23 2014 at 7 23 am Laburnum Richard I use it for nearly all my wedges I like the contrast and it is very hard and strong I keep a supply of bone dry cleft straight grained laburnum by the fireplace Reply Martin April 24 2014 at 7 20 am Robin and Richard Is wedges a term for the pieces of wood you start off with and that using dried bog oak laburnum wedges avoides the sanding problem because of the properties of these woods Sorry this is a beginner asking Reply Robin Wood April 26 2014 at 10 55 am Martin the wedges are nothing to do with sanding Richard was looking at the stool that I did the photo on and the wedges are the dark bits of wood in the top of the stool legs Reply David April 23 2014 at 8 48 am Makes perfect sense I see now that in my impatience to make what I considered to be a beautiful spoon I ve lost the plot when it comes to improving my skills Believing that sanding could remove a multitude of sins I have made little effort to improve my knife finish The result being lots of pretty looking spoons that are actually unpleasant to use Ultimately function is the most important thing a spoon that s unpleasant to use is just a bit of firewood So a Eureka moment I ll throw away the sandpaper and start learning Thanks Robin Reply Robin Wood April 23 2014 at 8
    http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2014/04/22/dont-use-sandpaper/ (2016-05-01)

  • article in the Guardian today - Robin Wood
    2009 at 4 36 pm Came across the article in the Guardian before I saw it on your blog A nice write up and good pictures too I like the apron All the best Sean Reply Leave a Reply Click here to cancel reply Name required Email will not be published required Comment Search Blog Posts News and social media My newsletter has updates on new products courses and events Sign up here Latest blog posts Creative goodness The story of a spoon Spooncarving knife making in Sheffield Do what you love The Man Who Made Things From Trees me on Radio 4 Featured blog posts How to price craft work business advice for craftspeople Which is the best spoon carving knife hook knife any fool can make something more complex but it takes real genius to make things simple again building the world s most iconic viking ship part 1 Welsh love spoons and cawl spoons how to make a new axe handle What is the best knife for wood carving and whittling which is the best axe for carving bushcraft general use how to carve wooden bowls what is the best oil for treating wood Past posts Past posts Select Month April 2016 February 2016 December 2015 November 2015 September 2015 August 2015 June 2015 May 2015 April 2015 March 2015 February 2015 January 2015 December 2014 November 2014 October 2014 September 2014 August 2014 July 2014 June 2014 May 2014 April 2014 March 2014 February 2014 January 2014 December 2013 November 2013 October 2013 September 2013 July 2013 June 2013 May 2013 April 2013 March 2013 February 2013 January 2013 December 2012 November 2012 October 2012 September 2012 August 2012 July 2012 June 2012 May 2012 April 2012 March 2012 February 2012 January 2012 December 2011 November
    http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-craft-blog/2009/12/12/article-in-the-guardian-today/ (2016-05-01)


web-archive-uk.com, 2016-09-26