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  • Most Haunted Universities in the UK? – Simon Whaley
    Project Ten Teatime Tales Best Walks in the Welsh Borders The Bluffer s Guide To Hiking 100 Greatest Walks In Britain The Little Book Of Alternative Garden Wisdom The Bluffer s Guide To Banking The Freelance Photographer s Project Book Chapter 18 100 Stories For Queensland Photography Greetings Cards Short Stories Read Short Stories Writing Courses Writers Resources Info for Writers Competition Judging Links Most Haunted Universities in the UK By simonwhaley On 2 January 2014 In NEWS The Telegraph ran a feature in October 2013 listing the top ten most haunted universities in the UK and used one of my photos to illustrate the ghost story for one of those universities Click this link to see the photo and the ghost story http www telegraph co uk education universityeducation student life 10409035 Top ten university ghosts html frame 2716341 Share this Click to share on Twitter Opens in new window Click to share on Facebook Opens in new window Click to share on Google Opens in new window Click to share on LinkedIn Opens in new window Click to share on Pinterest Opens in new window Like this Like Loading Daily Telegraph Previous Hayeswater Next It Rains Get Over It Comments are closed Welcome Click on the photo to find out About Me More links NEWS Free Downloads Mindful Moment Search this site Recent Updates A Positively Productive Review 15 February 2016 Frozen Flow 15 February 2016 Teme Twister 14 February 2016 Slowing Up 13 February 2016 Weaving Water 12 February 2016 Publications Amateur Photographer BBC Countryfile BBC Midlands Today BBC One o clock News Best of British Country Border Life Country Walking Cumbria Daily Telegraph Discover Britain Ezee Writer Freelance Market News Great Walks Australia Holiday Cottages Lakeland Walker Outdoor Photography Outdoor Pursuits That s Life Fast Fiction

    Original URL path: http://www.simonwhaley.co.uk/most-haunted-universities-in-the-uk/ (2016-02-17)
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  • History in Black and White – Simon Whaley
    has two wonderful secrets Inside an ornately carved Romanesque style font dating from 1135 continues to be used for christenings today The second secret concerns the novelist Charles Dickens who visited the area on numerous occasions Literature lovers should investigate the Church s vestry for there high on the stone wall are two memorials to the Barnsley family Those in the know soon realise the memorial recounts exactly the same plot as used in Dickens epic novel Bleak House Kington Spotting timber framed buildings is not easy during the drive through Kington as many of these buildings now have a Georgian or Victorian façade masking their original wooden structure When cut and dried oak can be almost as hard as iron so these structures have been very durable Trees were felled and squared up in the woods before being hauled to a framing yard where the joints were cut The building was prefabricated and the timbers carted to the construction site for assembly This process gives the building immense strength to the point that you could pick up a timber framed building and turn it upside down today and the basic structure would remain intact Kington is the only Herefordshire town lying on the Welsh side of Offa s Dyke an 8 th century earth mound border frontier designed to keep the English and Welsh apart It offered Kington publicans a useful economic bonus because English pubs were permitted to open on a Sunday whereas Welsh pubs were not an idiosyncrasy that wasn t finally rectified until 1996 Kington also has a literary claim to fame based upon one of the town s most feared residents Thomas Black Vaughan THe Vaughans were an influential family who controlled the area with a tight rule during the 15 th century Black Vaughan s demise while fighting for King Edward IV s army at the Battle of Edgecote Moor in July 1469 did not end the locals terror as his spirit is said to have continued to torment the people of Kington Sometimes it was an annoying fly once as a bull that caused havoc in St Mary s Church and at other times as a large ghostly black dog Sir Arthur Conan Doyle regularly visited relations near Kington suggesting that perhaps Black Vaughan was the inspiration for his famous novel The Hound of the Baskervilles Consider the clues the menacing back dog terrorising local people and an Eardisley family named Baskerville Even some of the characters names Dr Mortimer Mr Stapleton may have been drawn from the surrounding area as Mortimer Forest once covered huge swathes of north Herefordshire whilst the village of Stapleton lies five miles away Pembridge Pembridge proudly displays its wealth The Kings House in East Street has numerous vertical strips of wood known as close studding particularly on its upper floor Structurally this was unnecessary but as wood was pricey close studding was a reflection of the owner s wealth The village s affluence means there are many

    Original URL path: http://www.simonwhaley.co.uk/history-in-black-and-white/ (2016-02-17)
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  • In The Beginning … – Simon Whaley
    Productive Writer Photography for Writers Running A Writers Circle Fundraising For A Community Project Ten Teatime Tales Best Walks in the Welsh Borders The Bluffer s Guide To Hiking 100 Greatest Walks In Britain The Little Book Of Alternative Garden Wisdom The Bluffer s Guide To Banking The Freelance Photographer s Project Book Chapter 18 100 Stories For Queensland Photography Greetings Cards Short Stories Read Short Stories Writing Courses Writers Resources Info for Writers Competition Judging Links In The Beginning By simonwhaley On 17 January 2013 In Writers Resources Ezee Writer Want some tips on how to make your beginnings more interesting Check out my article in the January issue of Ezee Writer http www writersbureau com e zee writer january 2013 page3 htm Share this Click to share on Twitter Opens in new window Click to share on Facebook Opens in new window Click to share on Google Opens in new window Click to share on LinkedIn Opens in new window Click to share on Pinterest Opens in new window Like this Like Loading Ezee Writer Previous Great Feedback Next Calling all Dogs with eReaders Leave a Reply Cancel reply Welcome Click on the photo to find out About Me More links NEWS Free Downloads Mindful Moment Search this site Recent Updates A Positively Productive Review 15 February 2016 Frozen Flow 15 February 2016 Teme Twister 14 February 2016 Slowing Up 13 February 2016 Weaving Water 12 February 2016 Publications Amateur Photographer BBC Countryfile BBC Midlands Today BBC One o clock News Best of British Country Border Life Country Walking Cumbria Daily Telegraph Discover Britain Ezee Writer Freelance Market News Great Walks Australia Holiday Cottages Lakeland Walker Outdoor Photography Outdoor Pursuits That s Life Fast Fiction The Author The Independent The Observer The People s Friend The Simple Things

    Original URL path: http://www.simonwhaley.co.uk/in-the-beginning/ (2016-02-17)
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  • Great Feedback – Simon Whaley
    Fundraising For A Community Project Ten Teatime Tales Best Walks in the Welsh Borders The Bluffer s Guide To Hiking 100 Greatest Walks In Britain The Little Book Of Alternative Garden Wisdom The Bluffer s Guide To Banking The Freelance Photographer s Project Book Chapter 18 100 Stories For Queensland Photography Greetings Cards Short Stories Read Short Stories Writing Courses Writers Resources Info for Writers Competition Judging Links Great Feedback By simonwhaley On 8 January 2013 In NEWS It s always nice to receive positive feedback on some of your work and I was delighted to discover today that the latest issue of Freelance Market News magazine has two letters from readers who appreciated my article about how to make the most of digital magazine apps in the November issue First letter Second Letter Share this Click to share on Twitter Opens in new window Click to share on Facebook Opens in new window Click to share on Google Opens in new window Click to share on LinkedIn Opens in new window Click to share on Pinterest Opens in new window Like this Like Loading Freelance Market News Previous Privacy Policy Next In The Beginning Leave a Reply Cancel reply Welcome Click on the photo to find out About Me More links NEWS Free Downloads Mindful Moment Search this site Recent Updates A Positively Productive Review 15 February 2016 Frozen Flow 15 February 2016 Teme Twister 14 February 2016 Slowing Up 13 February 2016 Weaving Water 12 February 2016 Publications Amateur Photographer BBC Countryfile BBC Midlands Today BBC One o clock News Best of British Country Border Life Country Walking Cumbria Daily Telegraph Discover Britain Ezee Writer Freelance Market News Great Walks Australia Holiday Cottages Lakeland Walker Outdoor Photography Outdoor Pursuits That s Life Fast Fiction The Author The Independent

    Original URL path: http://www.simonwhaley.co.uk/great-feedback/ (2016-02-17)
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  • Hay Fever – Simon Whaley
    to buy Here in Hay you should savour the experience feel the books stroke the pages smell its wisdom and marvel at its contents It is necessary to step carefully wherever you go I discover In this town books are everywhere Piled up on the stairs between floors inside buildings or even stacked on shelves down side alleys and under tarpaulins Some like those in the Castle Bookshop grounds have to take their chance against the elements and if you decide to rescue one from here the shop assistant is merely an honesty box in the wall Festival Frivolity The next chapter in Hay on Wye s recent history began in 1987 with the very first Hay Festival Although there are literary events it s not just about books there are lectures talks and chats on a variety of subjects In a field on the outskirts of Hay huge marquees are erected to house the events which have attracted guest speakers as diverse as Rosie Boycott Sandi Toksvig Jonathan Dimbleby Kathy Lette John Mortimer Simon Schama and Ian Rankin as well as people like singer Seth Lakeman politicians John Major and Gordon brown singer Billy Bragg comedian Dara O Briain and even TV s Columbo Peter Falk Bill Clinton visited the Festival in Hay in 2001 less than five months after stepping down as President of the USA and the 411th event of the 2007 Festival was Bryn Terfel in Concert Not bad for a community on the edge of the Brecon Beacons with a population of around 1 500 The Festival brings 80 000 people into Hay for the last week in May and the first week in June and the event injects on average 3 million into the local economy Accommodation is immensely scarce for these two weeks and the festival s own accommodation booking service opens in January each year Self catering properties for the festival fortnight are snapped up early Wandering around Hay it s easy to see that whatever your interests there s a bookshop in Hay to suit you Whether it s Murder and Mayhem in Lion Street where you can track down your next purchase or the Poetry Bookshop in Brook Street where odes and haikus do battles with sonnets and verse For the A to Z of languages Axeri to Zulu Merijana Dworsk Books in Backfold is the place to get tongue tied All Booked Out But even if a place of books isn t your library ticket there s more to Hay than books Nestling in the northeast corner of the Brecon Beacons National Park it s a great area for walking Not only does it give you access to the Brecon Beacons mountains but the Offa s Dyke National Trail passes through the town as does the Wye Valley Walk And if you d rather not wander along the Wye then why not pop along to nearby Wye Valley Canoes open April to October and hire a Kayak to drift

    Original URL path: http://www.simonwhaley.co.uk/hay-fever/ (2016-02-17)
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  • Alcock Tarn – Simon Whaley
    Swan Lane to reach the A591 opposite The Swan Hotel Cross over taking the lane to right of hotel and later fork left at junction Take the signed Alcock Tarn tarmac path on right which soon has Greenhead Gill running along on the right to reach the open lower flanks of Heron Pike 2 1 mile 1 5km Bear right crossing over Greenhead Gill Look out for the mini cairns piled on top of some of the stream s rocks is this the National Park s Cairn Breeding Centre Climb steeply and pause at a wooden bench to see a stone bridge crossing the stream on the left It s actually the pipeline carrying water from Thirlemere Reservoir 3 ¼ miles north from here to Manchester over 90 miles to the south Luckily it s downhill so no pumps are needed Look behind for good views of Helm Crag from here too The path continues climbing drawing closer to the stone wall then turns right around the wall corner before zigzagging upwards passing close to another wall Continue through a rocky area where the ground levels Pause again to turn around and view the upper reaches of Greenhead Gill which is a Scheduled Ancient Monument Remains of a 16th century lead mine have been found here Continue along the path and then pass through the gate to reach Wainwright s dreary Alcock Tarn 3 1 5 miles 2 5km This was originally known as Butter Crags Tarn until is was dammed and enlarged for keeping trout by Mr Alcock Would Wainwright have been charmed by the smaller Butter Crags Tarn Take the path along the tarn s right hand edge through another gate and climb onto Grey Crag This offers good views towards Windermere over Grasmere and glimpses of Coniston Water Descend steadily passing through stone walls zigzagging to a track Turn left through Brackenfell passing through a metal gate and dropping to a lane with a metal bench on the corner 4 2 7 miles 4 3km Turn right onto the lane then right again at a junction Look out for the resting stone on the right used by coffin bearers travelling from Rydal to St Oswald s in Grasmere Continue descending into Grasmere passing Dove Cottage and then cross over the A591 to return to the town centre VITALS Grade Stroll Terrain Tarmac lanes and paths and clear paths on fell sides although can be muddy in places Distance 3 5 miles 5 5km Time 1 5 2 hours Climb 1030ft 314m Start Finish Red Bank car park Grasmere Grid ref NY335073 Maps Harvey Maps 1 25 000 Superwalker Lakeland Central or OS 1 25 000 Explorer OL7 or OS 1 50000 Landranger 90 Transport Service 555 runs through Grasmere Centre www stagecoachbus com or Tel Windermere Tourist Information Centre 015394 46499 Accommodation B Bs hotels self catering and camp sites in Grasmere Refreshments numerous places in Grasmere including Tweedie s Bar at Dale Lodge Hotel the Potting

    Original URL path: http://www.simonwhaley.co.uk/alcock-tarn/ (2016-02-17)
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  • Swirling Around Coniston – Simon Whaley
    smaller path passing through a stone wall The path bears left climbing more steeply to the corner between stone walls before passing through another stone wall The route gets steeper climbing up to a junction with a wide track Bear right and soon after fork left to continue climbing The path narrows and meanders its way up to reach the disused mine workings Loose stones can make traversing this section more interesting particularly after rain 2 1 ½ miles 2 5km Continue zigzagging up to the edge of Low Water Here the path veers left to snake its way along the final section of the climb to the summit of the Old Man of which some places are steep The path follows the top of the ridge overlooking Low Water to reach the large cairn on the summit Enjoy the views of South Lakeland the Pennines and the Isle of Man although Wainwright suggests in Book Four of his guides that its tourists prefer gawping at Blackpool Tower and other man made objects from here Whilst Dow Crag looks impressive and the Skiddaws can be spied from here Wainwright felt the view from Swirl How offered the serious walker a better vista 3 2 ½ miles 4km From the Old Man s summit 2633ft the route follows the obvious ridge passing the OS trig point before dropping briefly and then climbing once more to the summit of Brim Fell 2611ft Continue ahead dropping once more to pick up the ridge again with good views of Seathwaite Tarn to the left Ignore the steep path on the right down Levers Hawse towards Levers Water but continue ahead climbing once more up Swirl Band towards the summit of Swirl How 2630ft and a T junction of paths Wainwright was right Being closer to the Central Fells the views from here include the Isle of Man Scafell Great Gable Bowfell the Langdale Pikes Blencathra Helvellyn Fairfeld and the Pennines 4 4 ¼ miles 7km From the summit cairn turn right to take Prison Band dropping steeply in places to a path junction Turn right here bearing left around the fell side to pick up the western flanks of High Wether and Low Wether Crags and then dropping to the edge of Levers Water Follow this to the weir and bear left onto a wider track to the stream s left Follow this downhill and where the track turns sharp right continue ahead on a smaller path bearing gently round to the left Pass through a stone wall bearing gently left Ignore a path off to the right and continue to drop into the Coppermines Valley eventually reaching a wide track just before a stream Turn right here passing a building and follow this between two more buildings Youth Hostel on right to another track Turn left and follow this to pick up the stream again on the left passing a row of cottages and a bridge on the left The track crosses over

    Original URL path: http://www.simonwhaley.co.uk/swirling-around-coniston/ (2016-02-17)
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  • Loweswater Loop – Simon Whaley
    some of its most outstanding views Quieter than its bigger sisters Crummock Water and Buttermere Loweswater has a charm of its own particularly the mixed woodland of Holme Wood and its native red squirrels It s a gentle route and one to be savoured than rushed DIRECTIONS 1 Start From Maggie s Bridge car park NT take the wide track leading towards Loweswater and Watergate Farm Pass the farm on the left and bear right through a gate into Holme Wood open access Rowing boats are available for hire here Continue into the wood and at a junction bear right onto a smaller path which takes you to the water s edge Follow this through the trees to the idyllically placed Holme Wood Bothy NT beside a natural bay with good views towards Whiteside Grasmoor and Mellbreak Follow the path as it meanders along the shoreline and then bears left to rejoin the main track at the northern end of the wood Turn right 2 1 ¼ miles 2 km The track leaves the woods and the open access area climbing gently between fields towards Hudson s Place Pass through a gate and bear right farm on left to retain track ignoring bridleway on left Drop gently as track bears right and then where it turns left continue ahead through gate into a field following the obvious path down to a small bridge across a stream Bear diagonally right climbing towards field boundary and then pass through a hedge and turn left along the field edge climbing up to a kissing gate to reach a lane 3 1 ¾ miles 3 km Turn right passing another parking area on the right and follow the lane Sections of this lane are unfenced and minor paths enable you to get closer to the water s edge although they all return you to the lane at some point Follow this as it climbs up to Thrushbank on the left offering good views towards Mellbreak and Carling Knott on the right After passing High Thrushbank on the left the lane drops gently Follow for another half a kilometre before taking the minor road on the right to return to Maggie s Bridge VITALS Grade Stroll Terrain Good tracks country lane Fields between Hudson Place and lane can be boggy Distance 3 ½ miles 5 8km Time 2 hours Climb 255ft 78m Start Finish Maggie s Bridge NT car park GR NY134210 Alternative parking at lane near Loweswater Hall GR NY118224 and NY121223 Maps Harvey Maps Superwalker Lakeland West 1 25 000 OS Explorer OL4 1 25 000 OS Landranger 89 1 50 000 Transport No direct public transport Simon Whaley Share this Click to share on Twitter Opens in new window Click to share on Facebook Opens in new window Click to share on Google Opens in new window Click to share on LinkedIn Opens in new window Click to share on Pinterest Opens in new window Like this Like Loading Lakeland Walker Previous

    Original URL path: http://www.simonwhaley.co.uk/loweswater-loop/ (2016-02-17)
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web-archive-uk.com, 2017-12-15