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  • Games Workshop  Games Day 2004
    can imagine In fact I defy any wargamer not to shout rubbish and throw the book across the room at some point when reading this chapter He then proceeds to look at four military revolutions in detail the Napoleonic Wars the Industrial Revolution the 1920 s and 30 s and The Cold War This is all very interesting if a little familiar There follows a look at the claim that we are currently in the middle of a RMA first identified during the Gulf War of 1990 91 You know the ideas precision guided munitions advances in intelligence gathering and computerised battlefield management But the author rightly points out that Iraq was a poor opponent and no one is likely to be caught with their pants quite so far down again And of course they weren t in the Second Gulf War which as we know is still ongoing Also many of the so called revolutionary techniques were really refinements of existing military technology So was it really the beginning of a new RMA or simply the conclusion of a RMA begun in first half of the twentieth century The central section of the book examines these ideas in detail I must admit that as a general reader rather than a professional military analyst I began to lose interest at this point However I did take note of the discussion about whether the rise of Asymmetric Warfare terrorism and such like is the current RMA rather than the aforementioned application of technology Before beginning to drift off again I was quite relieved when the author pointed out that in fact fighting the enemy with tactics dissimilar to one s own has existed as a military option throughout history In summary the book concludes that it s difficult to be sure

    Original URL path: http://www.wargames.co.uk/Pending/Archive/Dec04/MagicBullet.htm (2016-02-16)
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  • Games Workshop  Games Day 2004
    Each have their own particular strengths and weaknesses and of course their own history and mythology These can be studied in splendid detail in the Warhammer Supplement published in the normal gloriously illustrated A4 softback packed with superb examples of the painters art as well as the special rules for these fighters The ogres are often accompanied into action by a mob of Gnoblars small weasely creatures a far cousin of the Goblin race and just as untrustworthy vicious and cruel with huge beaklike noses These creatures are the slaves of the ogre race and regarded with utter contempt although Ogres do enjoy watching the creatures die in battle a sight they seem to find very funny Of course the models representing this bunch and unattractive thugs though I am sure their mothers had some sort of feelings toward them are superb Received for review a unit of six Bulls who retail at 20 Precision moulded in grey plastic the models include a variety of weapons to enable you to create a huge range of individual models in your units To add further variety to your army GW have produced a select group of white metal models and the Tyrant

    Original URL path: http://www.wargames.co.uk/Pending/Archive/Dec04/Ogres.htm (2016-02-16)
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  • Games Workshop  Games Day 2004
    use their cruisers to attack the convoys as they leave Germany They attack them in the channel and between Scotland and Norway They are assisted in this by the friendly power who provides coaling and repair facilities and intelligence The Americans also put to use a new weapon during an attack on New York harbour by hastily built torpedo boats The submarine They use their first sub the Holland to lead the attack The inventor is incharge though still a civilian but for appearances it is put under the command of an Ensign Ernest King A nice piece of irony I thought given Admiral Kings poor showing against the U boats in 1941 The friendly power I mentioned earlier is of course the British Empire The British wish to bring the Germans down a peg or two without resorting to all out war Infact in another nice touch from the author a reverse version of lend lease starts to take place as the Americans are supplied by the British from war stocks left over from the Boer war which has just finished Also a British fleet under Admiral Jackie Fisher protects the American fleet in Baltimore by closing the mouth of the St Lawrence seaway to the Germans under the guise of preserving Canada s neutrality So to put forward a few ideas for naval wargames 1 The Americans attempt to engage the German cruisers bombarding their coast with their own fleet 2 The Americans engage the German convoys and try to sink them without the German escort sinking them 3 A combined attack on New York Harbour is made against the German shipping there by both torpedo boats and the Holland 4 The American and German fleets slug it out in one big battle 5 The Germans clash with the British Fleet that habitually shadows them through the channel 6 The Germans attempt to attack the American ships in British harbours 7 The Germans try to force the St Lawrence by force to attack the Americans 8 The Spanish show up as allies to the Germans in the hope of getting their colonies back Ships are readily available from the Skytrex and Navwar ranges as well as suitable period WW1 rules Now for the land war This offers some great opportunities for some unusual gaming scenarios Lets start with the Germans They are easy enough as they are basically WW1 German infantry cavalry and artillery Some of the German units are reserve formations so they may still have the older Prussian blue uniforms That s that then now the Americans The American regular army at the time was still very small in comparison to other nations Many of these were deployed in coastal fortifications and on the Mexican boarder The frontier had only recently been tamed and large numbers of cavalry had been deployed to capture the last of the Indians Geronimo being the most famous With the Spanish American war the army had expanded but now had all

    Original URL path: http://www.wargames.co.uk/Pending/Archive/Dec04/1901.htm (2016-02-16)
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  • Games Workshop  Games Day 2004
    capability Writing in 1943 J R Lester Tank Warfare records that during 1935 1939 Many people thought that the progress in antitank defence had outstripped the improvement in tanks E W Sheppard Tanks in the Next War believed that the use of tanks would be limited Nor can this reviewer accept that at the beginning of the war the 2 pdr was already obsolete Pemberton s Official History of the artillery expresses pre war satisfaction with the 2 pounder and in 1940 our anti tank equipments and training may be said to have been vindicated The 2 pdr was a good gun and compared very favourably with its German equivalent The German 3 7cm Pak 35 36 Once equipped with solid shot instead of APHE used by the earlier 3 pounder the 2 pounder could defeat any 1940 German tank until the advent of German face hardened armour in turn defeated the AP round and its APCBC when that finally arrived An author who really should know better or his publisher s editor repeatedly commits the minor but irritating mistake of giving the Loyd Carrier and its eponymous designer a second L Other terminology is questionable Page 18 implies that only the 17 25 pdr was referred to as a Pheasant whereas this term was commonly applied throughout the war to any towed 17 pounders just as the term Firefly was commonly applied to the M10 Achilles as well as to 17 pounder armed Shermans And with regard to the Achilles the book implies that these 17 pounder M10s only saw service in the last year of the war This is most certainly not the case a number of Royal Artillery antitank regiments exchanged their 3 inch Wolverines for 17 pounder Achilles in time for the 6th June 1944 Most

    Original URL path: http://www.wargames.co.uk/Pending/Archive/Dec04/OspBritATart.htm (2016-02-16)
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  • Games Workshop  Games Day 2004
    year got stormier And the Bosches have got his body And I was his officer You were only David s father But I had fifty sons When we went up in the evening Under the arch of the guns And we came back at twilight O God I heard them call To me for help and pity That could not help at all Oh never will I forget you My

    Original URL path: http://www.wargames.co.uk/Pending/Archive/Dec04/PoemInMemoriam.htm (2016-02-16)
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  • How to Win a Victoria Cross
    Hill should this be achieved there would be 25 point swing in Victory points the Union losing 15 pts and the Rebs gaining 10 Everybody could not wait to conclude the battle the next day Ian and myself slept on the battlefield on the Saturday and I have to say the union got the better nights sleep modern airbeds beating my creaking 1970 s camp bed everytime I certainly cannot claim I was refreshed and ready for Day 3 after what must go down as one of my worst nights kip ever although I did feel better after a bacon egg Mcmuffin Overnight recovery and Re enforcements I have not heard a word from you for days and you the eyes and ears of my army RE Lee to General JEB Stuart Gettysburg 2nd July 1863 As mentioned earlier and unbeknown to the majority of participants Skedaddled stands would be able to be recovered overnight thus a separate tally had to be kept of casualty captured stands and those which had skedaddled Fresh Brigades are able to recover 3 stands Worn 2 stands and spent 1 After Day 2 the rebs were able to recover all of their 9 skedaddled stands 5 of which were allocated to Longstreet he having suffered the heaviest losses and the Union 21 from a possible 26 stands This represents stragglers deserters etc returning to their units Also overnight Brigades had up to 4 activity segments to use in order to be able to redeploy up to 24 recover ammunition or disorder entrench etc but if they did not spend at least 2 segments resting would lose a stand to fatigue and bearing in mind it was compulsory to spend 1 segment retiring beyond musketry range and if a brigade is worn this costs a further 1 segment and spent 2 segments so great care had to be taken to ensure this was carried out fairly Steve H and Martin ensured this was done The main tactical actions were Union VI Corps moved a further 12 towards the Rebel left and Picketts Division also moved 12 forward so these 2 formations were heading for a clash in the centre of the battlefield along the Emmitsburg Road nobody elected to use the entrench option something the union may have regretted Both sides had to give up some gains due to withdrawal beyond musketry the Union having to pull back a brigade from Seminary ridge and the Rebs several Brigades to the line of breastworks on Culps Hill and the corner of Seminary Ridge much to the disgust of Hancock and Ewell Johnson respectively Stuarts cavalry Corps 20 stands had also arrived and could be deployed on any road entry point on the reb side up to 24 in the decision was taken to place this Corps in the gap that had opened up between Longstreet and Hill and to place it under the formers command with orders to charge any opportunities that may present themselves but equally not to allow the Union to isolate Longstreet something they had almost achieved on Day 2 The Union also had 24 stands of Cavalry arrive under Pleasonton which they deployed in support of III Corps and V Corps so the cavalry was effectively deployed opposite each other but with a lot of Union infantry in between So the scene was set for Day 3 s fighting and the looks of surprise on many of the players when they saw all the recovery redeployments and re enforcements made all the hard work put into the scenario thoroughly worthwhile On the Sunday we began gaming about 10 30 with the Confederate 9 00 am turn we felt after the severe fighting of Day 2 the infantry would be simply too exhausted to start before this An absolute deadline of the Union Midday turn was set as a finish point Stay and fight it out Maj General HW Slocum XII Corps to Meade evening of July 2nd 1863 Gettysburg Day 3 July 3rd 1863 General it is my opinion that no 15 000 men ever arrayed for battle can take that position General Longstreet to General RE Lee Gettysburg July 3rd 1863 After the early morning mist had cleared the lead brigades of Sykes V Corps were shocked to find Rebel cavalry in the stirrups and only 12 away 2 brigades of cavalry immediately charged leaving 1 in support as the union infantry could only bring a limited amount of musketry to bear however the Dice favoured the union on this occasion and the surprise attacks were repulsed both charges only gave a 1 to the rebs in the melee with 1 of the Reb brigades losing 3 stands in the charge and subsequent retirement and became instantly worn The cavalry after this retired to lick its wounds and played no further part As far as the Reb High command was concerned events on their right flank were irrelevant provided Old Pete gave as good as he got whilst the main effort on Culp s Hill continued One thing we had expected the Union to do overnight was to pull back the exhausted remnants of XI Corps behind there new much stronger line on the back edge of Culps Hill this they failed to do and the gallant defenders were swept aside by wave after wave of Ewell and Johnsons brigades these broke through onto the stronger line which in turn was broken the game appeared up for the Union the only thing that could turn matters around was if VI Corps could smash into the flank of Ewells attack and retake Culp s Hill but the Rebs had anticipated this and Picketts Division was allocated to block this manoeuvre The two forces met in the valley and the Rebs again came out on top the Union had to concede after the Reb 10 30 turn that they were in no position to retake the vital Hill and the points would be

    Original URL path: http://www.wargames.co.uk/Pending/Archive/October04/update1/more/Gettysburg.htm (2016-02-16)
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  • How to Win a Victoria Cross
    expedition in a Morane monoplane The intrepid airman with nothing in sight to help him against the 600 ft ship did not hesitate and immediately set off in pursuit As he approached nearer the Zeppelin opened fire on him with machine guns but he still kept on in his one man machine aiming to get above the enemy so that he could drop his bombs the only weapon carried by the plane The Zeppelin was trying to reach the sheds at Gontrode just south of Ghent but as she saw the British monoplane gaining upon her unharmed by the fusillade of bullets she made that manoeuvre which was one of the Zeppelins best forms of defence She dropped a quantity of ballast and shot suddenly to a height of six thousand feet The aeroplane is a much slower climber by comparison but Warneford set the nose in the air and gave chase Just when he began to believe that it was all in vain the airship began to glide towards the earth Her station was almost in sight and safety not far away As the Zeppelin dipped downwards Warneford was still climbing and soon he was above his quarry Methodically and carefully he dropped his bombs The first four hit the airship which began to drift unmanageable past the safety of the sheds Warneford dropped to below two hundred feet above the Zeppelin and dropped the last two bombs causing the airship to hit the ground in a mass of twisted metal and blazing fabric killing the entire crew of twenty eight Unfortunately the Zeppelin had crashed on a convent in a suburb of Ghent Mont St Armand killing several nuns The violence of the explosion threw Warnefords aircraft upside down and drained all the fuel from the tanks Warneford

    Original URL path: http://www.wargames.co.uk/Pending/Archive/October04/update1/more/victoriacross.htm (2016-02-16)
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  • Games Workshop  Games Day 2004
    difficult affair even with the information super highway at my finger tips The book is excellently laid out with a concise chronology of the events that occurred during the revolutionary years in America The book sits along side the other previous releases in the men at arms series but has a more in depth view of the soldier s daily life and the trials and tribulations there in It deals

    Original URL path: http://www.wargames.co.uk/Pending/Archive/October04/update1/more/OspContInf.htm (2016-02-16)
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